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New Cut Projects

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by quinton, May 2, 2017.

  1. quinton

    quinton

    936
    Nov 4, 2006
    I don't do a lot on a regular basis these days, but I thought I would put up a thread to share photos and random ramblings when I do. Projects will be mostly axes and hatchets, but could involve anything that will rust, and should be sharp, or anything pertaining to the above.
     
  2. Whiskey_Jim

    Whiskey_Jim

    280
    Feb 21, 2017
    Like axe-mod projects?
     
  3. quinton

    quinton

    936
    Nov 4, 2006
    I was looking through my staves for no particular reason the other day and came across one that just inspired me. It inspired me mainly because it was ugly, and I wanted to use it to get rid of it. It had some wavey grain, a slight bow, and a little strip of brash wood near the heartwood side of the stave. I decided to hew the bow off it to see if I thought I could get a double bit handle out of it before I cut it in half for hatchet handles. Here's how the project went.

    A 3 1/2 lb. Collins era, Sager DB head I picked up a few years ago. The stave is BARELY wide enough to even think about hanging this head.
    [​IMG]
    I'm thinking maybe at this point.
    [​IMG]
    It's gonna work, but the shoulder is going to be a little narrower than I like on a DB.
    [​IMG]
    It's shaping up after a few minutes of hewing.
    [​IMG]
    Making the tongue, and fitting it to the eye. Also starting to cut some facets with the rasp to ensure I keep the handle straight, and inline with the tongue and shoulder.
    [​IMG]
    Working on the shelf, and facets.
    [​IMG]
    This picture is a little confusing. I'm holding the tongue in my hand while sighting down the haft for straightness.
    [​IMG]
    Final facet tweaking with the rasp for geometric uniformity along the full length of the haft. This works for curvey handles as well
    [​IMG]
    Finally, the tongue is through the eye and ready to be hung.
    [​IMG]
    Kerf was cut, and the head was hung with a sassafras wedge. It doesn't show in the picture, but I even cod locked the wedge by driving it deeper after trimming the tongue. Thanks guys, that was a nice tip I learned here on the forum!
    [​IMG]
    The thickness of the haft is 13/16ths along the length.
    [​IMG]
    The swell.
    [​IMG]
    A little file work on the bits, once through the oxidation layer, that old Ward's Master Quality file made pretty quick work of this part! After the bits were profiled, I hit them with a carborundum stone and then 180 paper.
    [​IMG]
    I took her to the woods this afternoon to work on maple windfall. The axe feels good and smooth to me and seems really accurate. For those that speak of flexy handles, there's some pretty good examples of this in this short video.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2017
    Java_Dude, halfaxe, garry3 and 6 others like this.
  4. quinton

    quinton

    936
    Nov 4, 2006
    Yes, but mostly axe hanging.
     
  5. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Very cool Quinton! That thing is ejecting chips at about 47s into your video.

    Stave to shave - great stuff.
     
    quinton likes this.
  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    It cuts great and you blows are well placed. You know what you're doing. That's a clean cut.
     
    quinton likes this.
  7. cityofthesouth

    cityofthesouth

    Jan 29, 2014
    Good stuff quinton, nice work.
     
    quinton likes this.
  8. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Right on laddy! Show forum watchers that making handles from scratch is imminently doable via rudimentary tools. This ought to motivate a few more of us, that are otherwise hesitant, to have a go at something like this.
     
    quinton likes this.
  9. quinton

    quinton

    936
    Nov 4, 2006
    Very doable with hand tools. Although.. I did use a 12" planer, and a radial arm saw to speed the process a little.
     
  10. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    I hear you. A band saw is 'handier than a pocket in a shirt' too when yer contemplating roughing out curved handles but nobody else has to know that!
     
    quinton likes this.
  11. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    635
    Mar 31, 2016
    the only power tools i use is a sander. and i regret it very much, because i work slow, it takes me all day to make a handle, and then the head, it doesnt even sit straight. ahyep its doable, it just sucks.
     
  12. quinton

    quinton

    936
    Nov 4, 2006
    Go slower, take two days maybe? Keeping the head straight is really important.
     
  13. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    Or fit the head first before wasting time on the rest of it.
     
    Java_Dude and Woodcraft like this.
  14. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    It's not a bad idea to fit an axe without wedging it before finishing the haft. The haft can then be tuned to the eye.
     
    quinton and Woodcraft like this.
  15. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    It takes me several days to do up a handle properly. Of course I could do it faster but I have working axes that get used in the mean time.

    The only powertool I use regularly is a little mouse/lion detail sander at the end unless cutting from quarter sawn wood then the jigsaw comes out.

    Certainly don't have any issues with powertools or think less of those who use them. If your axe is sharp, straight, and swings true then it's all just a means to an end I would think.
     
    quinton likes this.
  16. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Whether you use hand tools or power tools the hardest part is understanding how to do layouts so the end product is straight. You've got to be a real crackerjack to be able to do operations such as this only by feel and by eye.
     
  17. quinton

    quinton

    936
    Nov 4, 2006
    I learned years ago a good eye, and the octagonal facets are the only way to get a geometrically perfect handle by hand. A full size axe handle don't feel right, or work correctly if it has thick and thin areas along the length.
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  18. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    A keen eye and use it often.

    But calipers don't hurt! ;)
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  19. rockman0

    rockman0 Gold Member Gold Member

    573
    May 5, 2013
    :thumbsup: Nice work quinton, you can't hand pick a factory made handle that straight with such perfect grain orientation :)
     
  20. quinton

    quinton

    936
    Nov 4, 2006
    Thanks, rockman!:)
     

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