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Scrapmuk or sykco skinner

Discussion in 'Busse Combat Knives' started by J_mcrane, Jun 18, 2017 at 1:26 PM.

  1. J_mcrane

    J_mcrane Gold Member Gold Member

    522
    Dec 7, 2013
    I'm looking to get something with mudder handles for cold hunting season (deer, elk). I'm looking at the skinner and scrapmuk le. Anybody have experiences with these 2 knives? Pics welcome.
     
  2. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    Sucking Skinner would probably be more readily available.
     
  3. Sethrotull

    Sethrotull

    719
    Jun 4, 2009
    Scrapmuk LE is an awesome blade. I wish it was a little thinner but it's truly great. The heat treat on the 154cm is the best.

    Haven't really used my SY skinner but probably easier to find and cheaper.

    [​IMG]
     
    PA Trout likes this.
  4. Rob_Mob

    Rob_Mob Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 16, 2013
    The Skinner is great --- but if you want it to be a dedicated slicer and/or skinner -- you'd have to strip it. If you want to take it to the next level --- Mod it into a FFG
     
  5. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 29, 2010
    ..... I tend to disagree mate, on the stripping part particularly. I have both blades mentioned but have just not got around to using either, I have however used the hell out of a coated HRLM alongside my B4 on pigs, goats and countless deer. I frankly can't tell them apart in regards to function, they are different in hand and I love my B4 (that is well documented, as is the fact is still carries the factory, albeit stropped, edge) but if you told me I had to trade it for the HRLM I would not blink. The HRLM has a convex edge from my Worksharp KO. Last trip away I did also happily use a coated AD and it too performed just as I would want it to. Breaking down a critter and turning it into edible pieces does not required much more thought than a keen edge. I was packing a .32 ASH (coated) on the last hunt just because, never got a chance to slice and dice anything with it however.
     
    Rob_Mob likes this.
  6. Rob_Mob

    Rob_Mob Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 16, 2013
    Andy my brother --- in no way am I taking a dig at coated blades. Have used many for years and for an eclectic variety of tasks. They work wonderfully. However, there is added friction. Coated blades also tend to collect animal fat, tissue, blood, etc. It's just a product of friction. Will it work just fine and do great -- yes. Would it work better and be easier to clean and stay clean -- yes.

    Also, a Blade/Grind geometry that has less metal will slice better. Same for an FFG vs Saber.

    I personally left mine the way it came. I did however reprofile the edge, polish it, and clean up the shoulders. However, I didn't strip and didn't change anything else because I use mine for lots of different tasks and therefore prefer the Saber grind and the blade being coated (rust protection).
     
  7. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 29, 2010
    ...... didn't think you were mate. I do however think the 99.9% of users (professional chefs and perhaps meat workers aside) will never notice a practical difference in use between a coated and un-coated blade (talking skinning and game processing here), much the same for the vast majority edge work. If a knife is "shaving sharp" (that is an open equation I understand) it is more than capable of undertaking all the main tasks associated with game processing. I do almost as much skinning with my fist/fingers as I do with a knife. Edge retention and the ability to restore this in the field means the most to me at this point vs cutting geometry, though they can go hand in glove but sometimes not. I agree to some degree a coated blade may retain more gunk than un-coated however I find the clean up is almost the same for both practically (in the field I use a "wet wipe" or rag if I am near a water source). Handle material pose me more issues here than the coating or not on a blade.

    I tend to think that the practical aspects of using a knife for their intended purposes have been lost in the internet driven "precision edge conversations" (Rob I am not at all having dig at you here, I too love a well polished edge and do it myself) and how a knife can whittle hair/paper etc. And, as much as I love big blades, I see an axe as my most viable chopping tool and a knife as a second choice in this role (I really fun pass time I must admit)....yes I know I may get burnt at the stake here now........
     
    Rob_Mob likes this.
  8. Rob_Mob

    Rob_Mob Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 16, 2013
    haha no witch burning here! Yes Andy, for the most I do agree with you on most of the things you mentioned.

    I think there are some, who get way too obsessive over improved perceived "performance", rather than learning through experience and practical application. We see it most with Firearms, Ammo/Calibers, Bug Out Bags, etc.

    In my experience, when I reprofiled and polished my blades --- there was a fairly noticeable difference in cutting and chopping performance. It was much better than the performance I got with Factory Edges, edges after the Sharp Maker, Grinders, etc. I will say though that if a nice edge is genuinely shaving sharp and uniform --- going beyond that is not that much of a game changer.

    So in short -- you're right. The beauty of forums is that it allows theory to be debated and then practiced and perfected in the field. It requires both though -- to bring out the very best. Cheers my friend and happy hunting. Love your adventures and your posts!
     
  9. grogimus

    grogimus KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Apr 27, 2012
    I haven't had a Busse or kin MUK but have had several knives with similar blade shapes and I'd say Scrapyard Skinner all day between the two. MUK shaped blades are fantastic utility blades but you have to poke some holes when skinning or breaking big game down and the MUK profile doesn't do well at that. The Skinner has a huge belly for such a small knife but still has a strong point to make openings where you need to. The trailing point makes sure you won't poke a hole where you don't want one.

    [​IMG]
     
    Rob_Mob likes this.
  10. Mumbojumboo

    Mumbojumboo

    408
    Dec 20, 2010
  11. J_mcrane

    J_mcrane Gold Member Gold Member

    522
    Dec 7, 2013
    Thanks for the thoughts. I think I'll probably pick up the first one that pops up on the exchange. If I'm lucky, maybe the boss will real ease one in infi; Anorexic skinner le or something.
     

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