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Sledge Hammers!

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by steve-in-kville, Jul 17, 2016.

  1. rjdankert

    rjdankert Basic Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    Nice build - I like the joints. A little extra work but worth it IMHO. :thumbup:

    Bob
     
  2. RICKOFF

    RICKOFF

    372
    Jun 2, 2009
    Thanks Bob, fun little project.
     
  3. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  4. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  5. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Is that a cold cut?
     
  6. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    I would say so, it's a bit short and stout.
     
  7. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    Yes, I know. Sinned on this one! I mis-judged the fit and when I did the final seating in the head the kerf was just too narrow to get a wood wedge into. The handle was so tight that I didn't want to pound it out again so made the executive decision to use a metal wedge. It works, and the head isn't moving.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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  8. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    That seems like a reasonable use of a metal wedge.

    It's a nice looking hammer regardless.
     
  9. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    207
    Dec 20, 2015
    No,Sir,what it is is a narrow Set Fuller,one of the Most useful tools in many processes,axe-making in particular....Great tools,i'm rather wistful seeing such wealth....
     
  10. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    I certainly am not expert enough to challenge you...could you tell us more about how a narrow set fuller would be used?
     
  11. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    A dull cold cut and a narrow fuller would look an awful like alike.
     
  12. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    Exactly, my eye saw a cold chisel that needed sharpening. But I'm open to learning otherwise.
     
  13. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    207
    Dec 20, 2015
    Well,a good example of using fullers is demonstrated by Jim Austin in this video,https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQaaS71yfvM

    About the minute 2:12 he's using a fairly narrow fuller,then by 2:50 he's going to a yet narrower one.None of these are as narrow as the one you show,and i can't think of a demonstrable example right at the moment,but believe me,it's a Very useful tool indeed.The narrower the bit,thee more certain it's purchase in the steel,with so much more confidence one may execute certain transitions,to "drag" the material down with it.
    Also,a fuller such as yours would be used often for making locating marks,sharp enough to be very definite,yet radiused enough to be forged into a transition late without leaving the damage usual to a punch-mark,that'll cause a stress-"riser"(a concentration of force causing irreparable and ever-deepening damage to a forging).

    A cold-cut,most commonly,would probably have a longer bit(for wear),and also,unless a totally virgin one,have a secondary bevel ground on it...

    But,despite all that,one can never be certain 100% of course,as at one man's forge ANY tool can be used as the smith pleases,re-ground,re-forged,et c.....So you guys also have a point.And,being a poor and dysfunctional smith,i've reshaped many a tool at a moment's notice,not having a nice set of fullers,or what-not...

    The fullers came normally in 1/8 increments(by radius),and were numbered accordingly...Possibly,yours may have a number 1 or 2(if graduated in 16ths) on it somewhere...Sometimes sold with the corresponding bottom-fuller...They were like the socket-sets today,and were fairly costly,and certainly very handy and valued...
     
  14. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    186
    Mar 8, 2011
    Look like a good job to me.

    Question for everyone, what's wrong with metal wedges?
    Seems to be a general feeling on here that they are sub par, why?
     
  15. osage outlaw

    osage outlaw

    138
    Feb 21, 2015
    Here is my small collection plus a couple of splitting mauls. I put a hickory handle on the 4 lb red hammer. I use it to split big osage logs. The one next to it with the yellow handle is one that I found laying on the side of the road. I picked up the cross peen at a hard sale. I got it for some forging work.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    There is no need to pre-make a slot for installation of a metal wedge, or nails, screws, key blanks, what-have-you. Because of that these items often split the surrounding wood. Save your metal wedges for emergency field repairs. Or for laziness situations (a universal human trait!) when one can't be bothered to take a loose axe apart in order to re-wedge it properly.
     
  17. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    Someone modified this head into a rounding hammer. Kinda cool.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  18. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    This is an old hand forged 2.5lb crosspein head that I cleaned up with Evaporust. Hand made, it was a prime candidate for a hand carved handle so I obliged. The handle I took out of a hickory log. The end result weighs 3.25lb and is 15.5" long.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  19. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Nice work on that hammer JB. The handle coming from raw wood is cool. :thumbup:
     
  20. Able_walker

    Able_walker

    145
    Jul 16, 2015
    Yeah...that two-tone handle turned out nice.
     

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