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Spanish flea market finds.

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by I'mSoSharp, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    221
    Dec 20, 2015
    The welding of a few dissimilar pieces on the larger axe is a fairly standard method of obtaining the necessary mass/weight of head.

    As is the specific technique-"skew-weld"-very common in tool making.

    Equally possible as a repair or new construction....
     
  2. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    My first thoughts were of it being constructed of whatever materials were to hand, I guess it doesn't really matter what supports the hardened bit as long as it doesn't fail.
     
  3. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    221
    Dec 20, 2015
    That's it exactly.Many old axes,pre-/early Industrial Age,show evidence of having been welded out of scrap picked up off the forge floor,literally....:)...
     
  4. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    221
    Dec 20, 2015
    [​IMG]


    A schematic drawing of axes by Pleiner, with this caption:

    Fig. 22. Production seams on axes according to the upper surface.

    1 - Belgium, 6 to 7 Century,

    2 - Morley-Meuse 4th Century (center lap steel),

    3 - Lezéville, hr. 200, beginning 6th century,

    4 - Novgorod, 11 century. (Welded edge),

    5 - Kent, 6 to 8 century. (Welded edge).

    White: iron; spotted: steel. 1-3 after Salin, 4 after Kolcin, 5 after Antein.


    (Thanks,Jeff P.,for this info)
     
  5. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    Thank you very much Jake that's an interesting illustration, obviously this one looks very much like number 4.

    I have seen a few looking like number 2 but always though they were round raps that had been beaten on! Which in reality is probably what they were.....

    The thing that surprises me about the illustration is the dates, I imagine wrapped axes/ hatchets must have been made right up to (relatively) recently, the industrial revolution putting an end to them being made in any quantities in the western world?

    I'm not sure I understand why number 1 seems to have it's harder steel at the bottom of the eye, is it me not seeing something obvious? :rolleyes:
     
  6. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    221
    Dec 20, 2015
    I'mSoSharp,many of the things about earlier axes we can only wonder at...The schematics above are only provisionate,of course...

    The (presumed)lack of higher-C in the cutting edge can be any number of things...wear?Some different mechanism of hardening?(like the low C but very rich P alloys that work well work-hardened,as in peened).There's any number of possibilities.

    Different peoples have had their 'Iron Age' all at different times,and some took longer getting around to thermal heat-treating of carbon-alloys,but the act of forge-welding came early and naturally,being kinda an implicit part in the bloomery process,in refining the bloom.So people used it a lot,especially as it's reasonably economical.
    And yes,well into the 20-th c. the edges on cutting tools were welded in.
    But even today we use many tools overlayed(often by forge-,that is to say the diffusion-welding),with carbides,or whatever hardened alloy inserts about their cutting edges.
    The use of that principle is probably actually increasing....
     
  7. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    Hafted the larger of the pair.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    32" Rowen.
     
  8. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    I knew I'd seen the symbol on the middle old hammer I posted a coupla pages back, it's been bugging me a while, well it came to me today while using the microwave...............[​IMG]
     
  9. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Looking at that grain...was it so nicely cruved to begin with, or did you steam bend the haft?
     
  10. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    I'mSoSharp, that is terrific. Thanks for sharing the photos!

    Is the symbol on the hammer "microwaveable safe" or a warning?


    I was also thinking "rub hands vigorously until dry" lol
     
  11. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    1. Wash hands thoroughly.
    2. Rub hands briskly under air nozzle.
    3. Wipe hands on pants.
     
  12. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    A split log I had that had those nice curves to begin with then hatchet, draw knife, scraper & sandpaper.

    Thank you.
    I believe the hammer is microwave brand. :rolleyes:

    Haha :)
     
  13. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Nice!
     
  14. Canadian Mojo

    Canadian Mojo

    105
    Jan 5, 2016
    In a word: elegant.
     
  15. OMark

    OMark

    11
    Mar 26, 2017
    Beautiful work!
     
  16. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    Thanks for the nice comments, appreciated :)

    Now hammers, shovels etc are tolerated, am I a bit too far off topic with these? :rolleyes:

    Sorry no rusted up before pics. 14" long.

    [​IMG]

    I've been looking for a pair of these for my wife who does a little sewing.
    Funnily enough she tends to gripe a little about the vinegar & ferric chemistry station in the kitchen that usually has iron items in various states, didn't say anything when these were being cleaned. ;)

    [​IMG]

    The vendor had an even bigger pair but I thought 14" was plenty big enough!
    These were very rusty but the most important bit the edge is in OK shape, a fed dings I've stoned out, no markings which I find strange.
     
  17. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    I enjoy them! I'll just leave this here, for anyone doubting not all scissors are made equal :):

    [video=youtube;PWRw_6StpQQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWRw_6StpQQ[/video]

    Truly an artist at work.
     
  18. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    Cool vid Moonw :)

    Can't help looking at his cutlers hammer & wondering if that handle shape is wear. :eek:
     
  19. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Same!
     
  20. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    204
    Mar 8, 2011
    Back to axes :) Some more heads freshly cleaned, no before pics.

    A real mixture of ages, a relatively recent little "Olivo" 5" long & 1lb, then the middle one at 7.5" & just under 2 lb marked with a large "A" same makers mark as the head in posts #73 & 87 but not wrought & appears to be cast?
    The largest head is 9" long & weighs 3 pounds, made from wrought with it's cool layers, marked but can't make it out.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Hope you like them.

    I'm going to have to get handle making I think!
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017

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