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Survival knife ?

Discussion in 'Carothers Performance Knives' started by Revolverrodger, Mar 2, 2017.

  1. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger

    Jul 23, 2007
    I'm wondering if there was any updates concerning the survival knife model ?
    Any rough specs on that knife ?
    Thanks
     
  2. Nathan the Machinist

    Nathan the Machinist KnifeMaker / Machinist / Evil Genius Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 13, 2007
    11.8" total length, 6.5" blade, 12.9 ounces, .220" thick, .020" edge before sharpening, 20 DPS, Delta 3V at HRC 60.5. Elements of the blade geometry are similar to the Field Knife and there are some similarities with the handle on the LC. Moderate primary grind geometry and edge thickness and a robust spine will make it a very durable knife that will cut well and have some chopping ability as well. It's not exactly light weight, but it will be the most durable knife we've produced since the Shiv (Heavy Chopper prototypes notwithstanding). We're working on prototypes now.
     
  3. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger

    Jul 23, 2007
    This is super exciting !
    I hope it will be my first CPK knife... if I'm fast enough at the sale !
     
  4. ManOfSteel89

    ManOfSteel89 Gold Member Gold Member

    786
    May 20, 2012
    Awesome Nathan! Going with a 90* spine or is it gonna destroy too many thumbs?
     
  5. betzner

    betzner Home ToMorro Platinum Member

    Jan 23, 2007

    Sounds like a good fit within the model stream. Very much looking forward to this one!
     
  6. Standard78

    Standard78 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2015
    Can't wait to see this one!
    Will these have a fuller similar to the Light Chopper, or is that unnecessary on a blade this size?
     
  7. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger

    Jul 23, 2007
    Please no fuller please.
    The 90o spine would be very useful... it's a survival knife after all: maximum function
     
  8. Nathan the Machinist

    Nathan the Machinist KnifeMaker / Machinist / Evil Genius Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 13, 2007
    It wasn't necessarily a "must have", but given the stock thickness I felt it made sense to incorporate a fuller into this design.
     
  9. Nathan the Machinist

    Nathan the Machinist KnifeMaker / Machinist / Evil Genius Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 13, 2007
    For a given a weight and amount of material a blade with a fuller is stiffer and stronger because it allows thicker stock to be used at the spine (increased section modulus). That stiffer blade will pry better, the thicker spine will tolerate batoning better. Functionally, a fuller allows less material to do more work. So when using thick stock I can either make a bolo shape, drill holes, accept un-useful weight, or cut a fuller. Be aware the grind height is driven by a selected (functional) primary grind angle, not aesthetics, so a blade with a given blade depth and stock thickness is going to have a flat on it. It makes sense to skeletonize a thick blade to remove material that isn't pulling its weight and a fuller is a part of that process.

    I don't use a fuller in a design when it serves no purpose, but when a design will benefit from the additional machining I'd be crazy to skip it. Also, adding a fuller to the tool kit gives one more tool to tweak weight distribution. Most of my knives benefit from a light center and weight towards the ends (ironically opposite the approach taken by ABS style knives). A short fuller that tapers out towards the tip helps with that. And lastly, when a blade breaks during flexing it is usually behind the tip or near the plunge, removing material between these points may actually improve the flexibility of a blade in a way that promotes durability:

    [video=youtube;yC2PLk_04vE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yC2PLk_04vE[/video]

    My knife making process is much different than most. Hand made knives are difficult to fuller, and machine made knives are usually CNC ground on something like a Berger which doesn't generally do fullers. Milling them the way I do makes the things like chamfers and fullers come naturally. As a design and engineering element I think a well executed fuller is good bang for the buck.
     
  10. TommyGun56

    TommyGun56 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 29, 2014
    Please yes, WITH a Fuller!!!
     
  11. Lorien

    Lorien Moderator Moderator

    Dec 5, 2005
    a lot of people have claimed how a CPK feels great in the hand
    The most easily understood aspect of feel is physical, so that's probably the first thing a person thinks about when talk of feel comes up
    Feel also comes from a less tangible, but equally important, arena- physics
    It's not so easy to make a thing, borne from an idea, and mix all the ingredients in in their proper measure
    It's smart to use every technique available in order to get your recipe dialed in
    Function before form, with form not far behind
     
  12. on_the_edge

    on_the_edge Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 31, 2006
    What about a 90 degree spine...please???:D Or at least have a portion of the spine near the handle 90 degrees, though I suspect that might be significantly more difficult to do.
     
  13. evltcat

    evltcat Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 7, 2011
    From your description Nathan, I can only say...
    Come to daddy sweetness!!! :D

    I'm in for one, and please let there be a pre-order (since I SUCK at ever getting anything in a sales thread!)
     
  14. TommyGun56

    TommyGun56 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 29, 2014
    Yes a Pre-order would be Outstanding!!!
     
  15. Lorien

    Lorien Moderator Moderator

    Dec 5, 2005
    I think a spine without a chamfer would be easy enough. Just want to make sure that there's chamfer where it needs to be. If one wants more, it's likely easier to apply a chamfer after the fact than it is to remove the chamfer and apply a hard angle in its place
     
  16. Standard78

    Standard78 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2015
    That's great to hear!
    Useful and aesthetically pleasing.
     
  17. ManOfSteel89

    ManOfSteel89 Gold Member Gold Member

    786
    May 20, 2012
    Exactly. Smooth on the thumb ramp/jimping and 90* on the rest where your thumb won't be anyway would be awesome.
     
  18. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger

    Jul 23, 2007
    This man speaks the truth !
    I'm really excited to get that knife
     
  19. xxwarderxx

    xxwarderxx Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 27, 2015
    This is why I love these CPK blades. It's not just a knife that looks cool (although they all have), but everything about the blade is done with a purpose, and it's all about performance.

    I'm really looking forward to the release on this one, and then hope I can score one.
     
  20. Ratman79

    Ratman79 Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    779
    Jan 5, 2016
    I second the SK preorder idea.

    I am forced to miss out on the Fri. sales due to the fact that my system is woefully slow. If it happens that there is not a preorder, I will try my best anyway. The SK will no doubt be a winner just like my FK which I love.
     

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