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The Condor Bushcraft Parang Field Test New for 2013

Discussion in 'Knife Reviews & Testing' started by sweetcostarica, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. sweetcostarica

    sweetcostarica Banned

    619
    Jan 18, 2012
    This is the video review:
    [video=youtube;mW_QyPi81cs]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mW_QyPi81cs[/video]
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013
  2. sweetcostarica

    sweetcostarica Banned

    619
    Jan 18, 2012
    This is the written review:
    P1060691.jpg
    The Parang’s (also the Kukri, Golok, Barong, etc.) appeal is that it’s somewhere in between a knife and an axe, replacing both. When you get closer to the knife or vice versa in your design you loose your advantage and the blade is not as effective. The Condor Bushcraft Parang is on the heavy side for a Parang and it's blade is so obtuse the result was a tired arm and a blade that bounced off the wood more than cut it. In splitting this Parang is king, doing this task with ease. It is clear the Condor leans more toward the axe than most Malaysian Parangs and in that effort it fails. The El Salvadorian blade needs to be lightened and thinned to be a better tool and to do anything other than split with. As it is now you would be better served with a belt axe or hachette.
    P1060722.jpg

    P1060673.jpg
    The Gerber Bear Grylls Parang was surprisingly good. It is lighter and thinner than the Condor Bushcraft Parang. This lightness made the blade easy to handle without tiring nearly as much as with the Condor. The Condor Bushcraft Parang Machete did feel like a sharpened crowbar in hand and in use it was not alive at all. The thinner blade of the Gerber was the best slicer and general performer in the woods. I was amazed at the differences between these two big knives.
    Note: After returning home, during the cleaning process I noticed the Gerber Parang’s handle was slightly loose. The handle screws need to be tightened and using “Locktight” for safety is a good idea.

    P1060706.jpg
    Specifications:

    Condor Bushcraft Parang Machete
    Length/Blade:* 33 cm (13 in)
    Length/Overall:* 49.7 cm ( 19.5 in)
    Spine thickness at Bolster: 4 mm (5/32 in)
    Weight:* 692 grams (24.4 oz)
    Blade: 1075 high carbon steel
    Polypropylene handle with lanyard hole.
    Black ballistic Nylon belt sheath.
    Made in El Salvador

    Gerber Bear Grylls Parang Machete
    Length/Blade:* 34.5 cm (13 3/8 in)
    Length/Overall:* 49.7 cm ( 19.5 in)
    Spine thickness at Bolster: 2.5 mm (3/32 in)
    Weight:* 521 grams (18.4 oz)
    Blade: 1055 high carbon steel
    Polypropylene handle with lanyard hole.
    Black ballistic Nylon belt sheath.
    Made in China

    Traditional Parang
    Length/Blade:* 29.7 cm (11 3/4 in)
    Length/Overall:* 45.6 cm ( 18 in)
    Spine thickness at Bolster: 5 mm (3/16 in)
    Weight:* 490 grams (17.3 oz)
    Blade: 5160 Tempered Spring Steel
    Wooden handle never with lanyard hole.
    Wooden sheath.
    Made in Malaysia

    P1060679.jpg
    Traditional Malaysian Parangs are handmade of recycled 5160 Spring Steel. Both the Gerber and Condor had bar stock high carbon steel with it’s edge being well heat treated. Neither Parang being field tested had the three different edges (front area very sharp for skinning, middle wider used for chopping, back end, very fine for carving). Because of their specifications and handmade quality traditionally made Parangs can usually out preform any production Parang.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013
  3. JayGoliath

    JayGoliath Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 27, 2010
    Nice review-

    Sweet Costa Rica,

    Did you get your Chandung from Outdoordynamics?
     
  4. sweetcostarica

    sweetcostarica Banned

    619
    Jan 18, 2012
    Yes, I did. They had one of the those once in a while local blacksmith sells of handmade Parangs. This one is special to me because of the original hole that a bolt went though it when it was a truck or car leaf spring.
     
  5. JayGoliath

    JayGoliath Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 27, 2010
    Yes we joked about it as "Spyderco" parang.
     
  6. sweetcostarica

    sweetcostarica Banned

    619
    Jan 18, 2012
    :):thumbup::)
     
  7. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Try thinning out that edge and trying again--it should perform much better. It's not uncommon for Condors to need a little tuning to cut well out of the box.
     
  8. sweetcostarica

    sweetcostarica Banned

    619
    Jan 18, 2012
    You're right FortyTwoBlades but I tried that on a 1st Generation Bushlore and OMG, that was tough steel to work. So no way am I going to do that on this 13" long Condor Bushcraft Parang. Plus that's just one thing.

    The others problems are the weight is too far on the heavy side for me & my girl & the teenagers. They can just barely swing it. The handle is also extra large for them. It's handle is OK for my XXL hands though.

    In a survival situation this large gripped Parang couldn't be wisely used by all members of the family or group and would tire you out much faster than traditional or other production Parang like the Gerber.

    Condor is a good company but for me a lot of their big blades seem like overweight monsters which are popular these days. But popular isn't necessarily the best for Bushcraft or Survival. What a shame.
     
  9. LG&M

    LG&M

    Dec 19, 2005
    Nice job, Thanks
     
  10. sweetcostarica

    sweetcostarica Banned

    619
    Jan 18, 2012
    My pleasure LG&M. Doing this type of review takes a lot of work and time but it's rewarding when I hear from people like you.
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    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013

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