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Virtual BBQ - 2 Brick Forge WIP

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by Atlas Knife Company, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. Atlas Knife Company

    Atlas Knife Company KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 16, 2010
    I've about worn out my old cheap grinder, so I've been holding off on working on blades until I get my new grinder finished. However, I wanted to participate in the virtual BBQ and offered to start a couple forge WIPs.

    [​IMG]
    First, let's start with the simple 2 brick forge of a non-traditional design. Normally, you hollow out the sides of two bricks and wire the two together. I did this but felt that it was a bit flimsy. I like a hole down the middle. It's a bit more work, but it is tougher and gives a better swirl for more efficient combustion. I also coat the inner chamber with cement. These bricks are so soft that your forging stock will quickly damage the brick. The cement on the other hand is very sturdy and easy to apply. You can stand the forge on other bricks, strapped to a cinder block works well, also.

    Here are the parts you might need to build it:
    $15 Two soft insulating firebricks
    $2 16 oz. Rutland 2700° refractory cement
    $3 12" x 24" 1/4" metal cloth
    $15 Propane torch (I prefer the MT245C by Magna, nice large flame)
    $5 Propane fuel

    Tools needed
    Saw
    Drill
    Tin snips / wire cutters
    12" long 3/16" drill bit or thick coat hanger
    3/4" or 1" spade bit
    2" or larger hole saw or forstner bit

    Start with two bricks. Normally, you would use straight bricks, but I have a plethora of arch bricks and the build process is the same.
    [​IMG]
    Cut them in half
    [​IMG]
    Stack them like this
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    Get a 2" - 2½" hole saw
    [​IMG]
    Mark the center of the bricks
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    Drill most of the way through three of the bricks from one side. The hole saw will bottom out so you will have to finish drilling from the other side
    [​IMG]
    Drill through the center hole and out the back side. This way the big holes line up better.
    [​IMG]
    On one of the bricks, drill a 3/4" - 1" hole(depending on your torch size, you want just a little bigger) in the middle of the brick about 1½" from the top into the top/side of the chamber. You want the flame to be able to enter through the hole and swirl around the chamber.
    [​IMG]
    On the fourth brick, drill half way through and remove the core by scraping it out. Drill/carve a pass through on the bottom of the brick just big enough for a blade but not enough to lose too much heat.
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    Using a long drill bit, coat hanger, whatever, drill down one of the corners deeper than your landscape screws. Empty out the dust and put the screw in. This will hold the bricks together while you drill the other three corners and insert the screws. It is very important that you pre-drill the holes. If you don't, the bricks will split and crumble.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Next, cut your metal cloth to fit around the bricks and a little extra to fold over the corners. I like to leave a little extra at the ends to fold over also. Fold the cloth around the bricks and secure it. Cut a couple 1" pieces of metal cloth wire to use to tie the cloth together.
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    [​IMG]
    Time to mix some refractory cement. A 16 oz. can is under $2 at most hardware stores.
    [​IMG]
    I use a small blender to mix it. You can mix it by hand, but it takes a long time. Cut the cement into smaller chunks and add 2-3 oz. of water to 16 oz. of cement. Mix until very smooth like pudding, adding water if/when necessary. Any excess water will dry out and isn't harmful.
    [​IMG]
    Coat the inside of the forge with a thin coat of cement. Give it a couple days for the cement to dry. The first time you fire up the forge, you can expect the bricks to get a few hairline cracks. This is because the tiny air bubbles in the bricks expand and cause cracks. This is normal, which is why we wrap the bricks in metal cloth.
    [​IMG]
    Give the forge a few minutes soak to warm up, then put your steel stock in and watch it turn orange.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. camoninja

    camoninja

    Feb 11, 2007
    Thats awesome. Thank you.
     
  3. tryppyr

    tryppyr KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 5, 2010
    You forgot to put the handle on it!!! ;)
     
  4. Atlas Knife Company

    Atlas Knife Company KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 16, 2010
    Sorry, forgot to upload that picture. If the pictures don't load, try again later, my web host is having issues today and yesterday.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
  5. BONY BOY

    BONY BOY

    14
    Dec 6, 2011
    Thank you for the write up! Perfect timing too! I just received the bricks you sent me. Thank you again!
     
  6. tryppyr

    tryppyr KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 5, 2010
    Nice! :) Gotta wear heavy gloves to use that handle! :)
     
  7. zuluninja

    zuluninja boricua grinder Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 25, 2009
    question - can you put cement in between the bricks and then screw them together? I might be picking up firebricks today, but seems like I will have a hard time finding that cement in Miami. The place where I'm gonna get the bricks wants 67$ for a bag of firebrick cement :mad: might have to get it online
     
  8. Atlas Knife Company

    Atlas Knife Company KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 16, 2010
    Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware, most should have the refratory cement. I haven't tried the stuff in a caulking tube, though. I first tried building one with cement between the bricks, it didn't work very well. Then I coated the forge with cement. With nothing to reinforce it, the hairline cracks came further apart and it was in about 20 pieces when it was done. Second, the cement is not insulating so it conducts the heat out between the bricks, which isn't good.
     

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  9. tryppyr

    tryppyr KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 5, 2010
    No refractory cement at Home Depot... they never even heard of it. None at Ace... haven't been to Lowes yet.
     
  10. tattooedfreak

    tattooedfreak Steel mutilater is more like it. Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    965
    Mar 12, 2010
    Try furnace cement, thats what I find it as here, in Home Depot and the local hardware places. Go to where all the furnace/wood stove stuff is and you will find bricks, cement, rope and caulking as well as other stuff.
     
  11. zuluninja

    zuluninja boricua grinder Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 25, 2009
    it must be the area. there really is no use for refractory cement in miami as we don't get really cold weather. I tried home depot online, and not a single store within 50 miles of my zip had refractory cement. Guess I'll buy it online.
     
  12. fast14riot

    fast14riot Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 27, 2010
    I went through the same thing here, even though it does get cold enough! Home Depot just didn't carry it here. I found it at a small neighborhood ace hardware. Maybe ask them if they can order it in for you. Its cheap enough you could buy a case of 4 or 6 (not sure how many come to a case). Nd resell it to other knife makers in your area. Maybe check the yellow pages for chimney repair/sweep and give them a call to see if the would sell you some.


    -Xander
     
  13. Atlas Knife Company

    Atlas Knife Company KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 16, 2010
    You can use Satanite as well. Not bad to have around for HT work.
     
  14. nifeluvr

    nifeluvr

    35
    Nov 3, 2011
    Been wanting to try this, Guess I'll have to get off my duff and get it done!
     
  15. Phil Dwyer

    Phil Dwyer KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 28, 2006
    Ceramic and pottery suppliers would likely have the stuff too.
     
  16. b_rogers

    b_rogers

    114
    Sep 25, 2011
    I found a company that makes stoves and fireplaces locally that has everything as far as bricks, insulation and coatings. I have also found rutland cement and the caulking at three small hardware stores as well, start looking in those places.
     
  17. Sam Salvati

    Sam Salvati

    Aug 6, 2007
    Chuck I wonder if it'd be even better with a double pass through like you did on the one end?
     
  18. unky_gumbi

    unky_gumbi

    Aug 28, 2009
    Try this I can't find the specs on it, but I know that I got the Imperial high temp cement at Canadian Tire, but I could get it at the Canadian home Depots.
     

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