Search results

  1. Obsessed with Edges

    Vintage Puma Thread

    6396 Original Puma Bowie. Being my first BIG expenditure for a knife, this is probably the one that began my obsession for it all back in the early 1980s. Date-stamped from 1981:
  2. Obsessed with Edges

    Swiss Army Tool

    :thumbsup: It's a pretty big testament to the quality build of such tools and the 100-years-old miracle of stainless steel, that the benefit of oiling the joints is sometimes nearly forgotten these days. After reading here, I had to look at my ol' reliable Leatherman Wave multi-tool, to see if...
  3. Obsessed with Edges

    How To Get Sharp Knives

    Agree with the above. The SM is an effective tool. And using it after learning freehand on stones is making the best use of the tools available. Using the SM gets easier and works better with an acquired touch for freehand. That's the beauty and the epiphany of learning freehand sharpening -...
  4. Obsessed with Edges

    No burr on alternating passes?

    If you fully apex the edge, a burr WILL start to develop - that's just the nature of sharpening. It may be less obvious when it happens, if switching sides with each pass. To make sure, it'd be a good idea to focus on one side only when you know you're getting very close to apexing. Maybe do...
  5. Obsessed with Edges

    Expectations too high, or use and enjoy?

    Brass is easy to clean up. Either polish it out, or a green Scotch-Brite pad will take care of it and leave a nice satin finish. Can also use a grit sequence of wet/dry sandpaper through ~2000 or so, and following with polish, to bring all the brass up to a high mirror shine. But in this...
  6. Obsessed with Edges

    How To Get Sharp Knives

    Whatever you like. Wine is very subjective, in terms of what people like or don't, so it's hard to make specific recommendations. At the time, I was a big fan of Australian shiraz - the Yellow Tail variety was very good and not expensive at all. Paired great with a peppered steak, BTW.
  7. Obsessed with Edges

    How To Get Sharp Knives

    Take a breather for a few days. Fall back & regroup. Eat well and sleep well. Let it all percolate in your mind while doing so. But don't stress over it. The pieces will begin to fall into place if you allow yourself the time & the rest to let it happen. I'm pretty sure everyone goes...
  8. Obsessed with Edges

    Remove diamond paste

    If you're going to reapply the same compound, you can clean the strop by wiping it down with a microfiber towel wetted with isopropyl alcohol. Can also do the same with WD-40 - just don't overwet it. The WD-40 will take longer to dry & evaporate from the leather, and too much of it might seep...
  9. Obsessed with Edges

    What micron do you use for stropping

    Most stropping I do is geared toward maintaining an edge that's already in decent shape and usually done with no compound at all, using something like a bare leather belt or a hard-backed denim strop without compound. In other words, I strop only enough to realign a slightly rolled edge or to...
  10. Obsessed with Edges

    Every stropped knife is Convex Edged and that is the best edge.

    Throwing these pics in for fun. Agree with earlier comments about convexing the shoulders of V-bevels and leaving the V-edge alone, save perhaps for some delicate polishing done carefully to protect the apex angle. The biggest benefit is reducing the drag created by hard-edged bevel shoulders...
  11. Obsessed with Edges

    Remove diamond paste

    If the 'green scouring pad' is a Scotch-Brite, that's aluminum oxide abrasive grit in a plastic binder. The green dust left behind by those is more likely to embed in the leather, and harder to detect it's there, than the coarse 100-150 grit garnet I mentioned earlier, as that grit is easily...
  12. Obsessed with Edges

    Remove diamond paste

    Maybe isopropyl alcohol on a rag first, to remove the heaviest accumulation. Don't use too much and DON'T pour the alcohol directly onto the leather - that'd be overkill and might even cause the adhesive holding the leather to the block to let go. You'd still need to remove the embedded grit...
  13. Obsessed with Edges

    If you can only have one...

    I've been essentially hard-wired, over the last 15-20 years, to carry a large stockman everyday. And within that pattern framework, I've comfortably embraced the Case '75 stockman as my first-choice daily carry. I've carried other very similar models from Buck (307, 301), Schrade (8OT) and...
  14. Obsessed with Edges

    Strage results when sharpening my Shiro 95T

    The width of the bevels, as compared to the primary (overall) grind of the blade, are a function of the sharpening angle AND the thickness of the steel at the edge. For a given fixed sharpening angle, a thinner blade will have narrower bevels and a thicker blade will have wider bevels. So, if...
  15. Obsessed with Edges

    What do you strive for when sharpening?

    For mainstream kitchen knives in typical stainless, nothing fancy is needed. Set the edge to 25-30 inclusive. Then finish with a somewhat toothy bite (320 - 600). I like a Fine India stone (360-400) for mine - but something like a 600 DMT can also work very well. Then, MAKE SURE THE BURR IS...
  16. Obsessed with Edges

    Every stropped knife is Convex Edged and that is the best edge.

    With the grey or white stick compound heavily loaded on a hard-backed denim strop of 12" - 15" length, it takes maybe 10 minutes or less to convex & polish the bevels on a folder-sized blade in 420HC or 440A. Blades like traditional folders from Case or Buck up to folding hunter size, for...
  17. Obsessed with Edges

    Every stropped knife is Convex Edged and that is the best edge.

    Depends on what you're stropping with. I use denim over a hard backing (wood) with aluminum oxide stick compounds (usually grey or white rouge) to quickly convex & polish bevels in steels like 420HC or 440A. Could also work on more wear-resistant steels like 440C, VG-10, even D2, using black...
  18. Obsessed with Edges

    Re profiling from 25 to 30 degrees inclusive

    Most any decent cutlery steel these days will hold up fine at 25° inclusive. For my knives, that's the 'sweet spot'. I generally focus on maintaining that for the most part, sometimes including a barely-there microbevel at 30° inclusive (using the SM for that). Most good cutting performance...
  19. Obsessed with Edges

    Making diamond spray into paste

    The MDF I use is smooth on both sides - if any difference at all, it's essentially indistinguishable as far as I can tell. A bit later today, I'll see if I can post a pic of a scrap of it (EDITED: pic added below). There are some types of 'hardboard' or 'masonite' that are MDF-like in some...
  20. Obsessed with Edges

    Making diamond spray into paste

    MDF is very smooth, very dense and beautifully flat. But it's actually not very hard. It's almost too easy to pierce, cut or otherwise damage with anything hard & sharp. It tears out easily when overtightening screws in it. To some degree, it's even easier to cut, gouge or pierce...
Top