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A test for cutting board materials

Discussion in 'Kitchen Cutlery & Tools' started by scott.livesey, Sep 25, 2018.

  1. scott.livesey

    scott.livesey

    Nov 10, 2011
    Trying to get some base data to do testing. I am using a basic digital postage scale. I added cutting board and item to cut, then zeroed. To slice an onion in half, I saw max weight of 6 pounds. Does this sound reasonable? Is this pressure or force?
    once i have some base line numbers, I want to apply the same weight using different cutting boards and see if board material effects sharpness. Test would be edge against board with chosen weight, move blade back and forth several inches ?? times. The test is to see if there is measurable difference in sharpness after cutting on PP, HDPE, face grain wood, edge grain wood, and end grain wood. Blade would be mounted in a vise and moved on a linear rail so you would be looking at a 'pure'(no side forces) pull cut.
    sound like a reasonable test or am i chasing unicorns?
    Current thought is anything other than edge grain or soft rubber damages the edge. The test is to see if there really is a difference among cutting board materials.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
    GABaus likes this.
  2. daizee

    daizee KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 30, 2009
    This is very interesting!
    It will be cool to see your results, and if you end up measuring what you think you're measuring. :)

    I suspect edge geometry will be a huge factor in whether or not edges are damaged by various boards.
     
    GABaus likes this.
  3. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    151
    Jan 23, 2017
    A scale can't measure force by itself, since Pressure = Force/Area.
     
  4. tim37a

    tim37a

    852
    May 18, 2010
    If you use the same knife for all the tests, the Area will be the same for every test, so it is a constant. As long as you push the knife down with the same force, as measured by pounds on the scale, the only variable will be the cutting board surface. Although I think it will be very difficult to perform the test, it should conceptually be valid.
     
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  5. scott.livesey

    scott.livesey

    Nov 10, 2011
    my idea is edge against board with constant pressure then move edge 2" forward then 2" back say 15 times. check sharpness. just a start to see what data might show.
     
  6. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    151
    Jan 23, 2017
    The cutting board surface is not really a variable. The scale won't care, it will measure the force. Large board, small board, all the same.
    No matter what you do, the force of the cut will be variable though.
     
  7. scott.livesey

    scott.livesey

    Nov 10, 2011
    so you pick highest force, apply that to blade and make cuts. the idea of test is to see if cutting board material by itself effects sharpness.
     
  8. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps

    254
    Apr 20, 2018
    Not at all being sarcastic here, but why not just run the edge over the board a couple times and test sharpness? Like a rope cutting test only dragging the edge across the bare board.

    Which materials dull the knife the fastest?
     
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  9. scott.livesey

    scott.livesey

    Nov 10, 2011
    that is the idea, but need to have same downward force all the time to eliminate that variable.
     
    GABaus likes this.
  10. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps

    254
    Apr 20, 2018
    Oh ok, ok...I got confused by the slicing the onion thing and thought you were going to try slicing an onion each time. But I'm guessing that was just to establish a baseline constant pressure to measure to. Got it.
     
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