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Photos Big tree hunting

Discussion in 'Busse Combat Knives' started by Currawong, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. Currawong

    Currawong Gold Member Gold Member

    May 19, 2012
    I've spent many years (about 25) bushwacking remote forest areas hunting for big trees - if possible in places that few (if any) people have seen before. It's just a hobby, but it keeps me fit.

    Today I went into a valley only 20 minutes drive from where I live but that for some reason I've never been into before. From what I knew it looked like it had potential for some real monsters. For those who don't know me this is in south eastern Australia, so the forest is eucalyptus and cool temperate rainforest.

    My traveling companions were a Bushwacker Mistress and an Infidu. Not too heavy but a very capable combination. I just received the Mistress from a member on these forums - this was its first trip into the field and I was keen to try it out to see what it could do.
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    Entering the rainforest
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    There are many giant logs like this one, providing plenty of climbing along the walk. Big ones require a running jump and then you kind of roll over it on your stomach (it is much less graceful than that sounds). You end up somewhat muddy (these logs are wet and rotting).
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    Another log. I probably could have walked around this one, but I need the exercise :D
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    This next log was almost impossible to climb over. I couldn't get a grip anywhere - it doesn't look it but it is wet and very slimy, particularly under the moss. At either end was vegetation that was impenetrable, so I had no choice but to go back or go over. The only purchase was the knob at the bottom, but it was too slippery to stand on and I would have ended up on my head. This is one of the times I'm very happy to be carrying a large field knife. I used the mistress to chop the top off the round knob to make a flat and stable step, and then easily scrambled over.
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    The mistress was also used to cut the two walking sticks in the shots above, and was used to cut several other (dead) branches that were blocking the way when it was difficult or impossible to walk around them, and also some thinner springy vegetation. It performed exceptionally well at all chopping tasks, I'm very happy with it now that it's been tested. It is much lighter (and thinner) than other Battle Mistresses, so it is a great slicer and fast in hand but I was worried it would lack power. In fact, it hits plenty hard enough for bushwacking tasks.

    (Continued...)
     
  2. Currawong

    Currawong Gold Member Gold Member

    May 19, 2012
    An interesting fungi
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    Thick moss everywhere
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    I could easily walk under this tree
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    On the right is an old rainforest tree - probably over 1,000 years old. On the left it looks like the Mistress is leaning against a smaller tree, but in fact this is a huge vine. You can see it snaking across the top right as well.
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    A close up shot of the vine, covered in moss. Vines get big in this forest!
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    More giant vines
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    A bed of Club Moss, one of the oldest plants on the planet. Before there were trees, there were ferns. Before there were ferns, there was club moss, and its still around today. The rainforest it is in is also very old - it has not changed much since Australia was part of Gondwana.
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    (Continued...)
     
  3. Currawong

    Currawong Gold Member Gold Member

    May 19, 2012
    Then I found the first big tree. (Bushwacker mistress in pic for scale).
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    And another
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    There were many more. Spot the Mistress in each pic...

    This one was hollow inside, but it was too dark to see what was in there. In the past I've crawled inside such trees and shone a torch, to see nothing but webs and dots of light in every direction - spider eyes!!
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    Well it turns out I was right, there were some big trees in that valley !

    Thanks for coming on this little adventure with me, a Hog and a Rat. :)
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  4. ipal

    ipal

    188
    May 5, 2009
    awesome pics, that is one beautiful forest.
    I like big mossy trees. for some reasons they radiate cool, peaceful feelings in me.
     
  5. Lapedog

    Lapedog Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 7, 2016
    Amazing pictures! It looks so different from any environment I have ever encountered, but in some other ways more similar than I expected at the same time.

    One question though, why belly spin over the log? Next time just use your Busse to cut it in half in one swing.
     
  6. zmbhntr

    zmbhntr ̿' ̿'\̵͇̿̿\з=(•̪●)=ε/̵͇̿̿/'̿''̿ ̿ Platinum Member

    Jul 28, 2014
    Outstanding pictures, thank you for taking us along with you on your journey! Very beautiful country you have; it is here as well, but so much has changed over the years and centuries.
     
  7. RobStanley

    RobStanley Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Dec 27, 2006
    Awesome pics man. I have family in SE NSW and the forests in the region are amazing. Prehistoric looking even. I can almost imagine a scene from Jurassic Park playing out in there.
     
  8. Leonardo63

    Leonardo63 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 24, 2017
    Stunning! Amazing stuff! :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    So on these adventrues you've taken me on I'm blown away by it but one thing you've not mentioned and I'm curious about them, is the animals of the forest? You seem not to worry about snake either, I could imagine giant boa's in that stuff quite easily- of course it's programming of what I would associate with those scenes based on what's been seen on movies or TV I suppose. What lives there? or does anything live in there?
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
  9. Jerry Busse

    Jerry Busse Moderator Moderator

    Aug 20, 1999
    Yowza!:eek:

    Thanks for the cool pics!:thumbsup::cool:

    Amazing!:eek:

    Jerry:D:D
     
  10. hydeinmind

    hydeinmind Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 30, 2015
    Really really cool! :)
     
  11. COPIUOS

    COPIUOS Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 24, 2015
    Currawong - thanks so much for taking the time to take some shots and post them here with the "exquisite commintree'" (pun intended, AND my bad attempt at phonetic spelling of a rugby announcer's voice - I played for a while, so done with love and respect for the best announcers in the world IMO)...

    The scenery is breathtaking and thanks for the hike-along...
     
  12. Chingon1988

    Chingon1988

    303
    Jul 6, 2009
    Great photos! That shelf mushroom is huge beautiful! I wonder what it is. The trunks on those big trees are incredible, Giant pieces of art.

    What those big burls must look like inside...

    Such a beautiful Forest.
    Thanks for sharing!
     
    Leonardo63 likes this.
  13. MacLaren1

    MacLaren1 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 15, 2014
    Super thread. Thanx so much for sharing!
     
  14. oge14

    oge14 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 14, 2007
    Thank's for the pic's. That is an awesome site.
     
  15. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 29, 2010
    Great pictures as usual mate !!!!!! That is some fun country, I am trying to pick where but it reminds me of the drive down from Queanbeyan to Batemans Bay.

    ..... Drop Bears, Bunyips, Yowies, Thylacine and several highly venomous snake species. I would guess a few of our python species would call it home as well, but down this far south they are not people squashing size... :D
     
  16. Currawong

    Currawong Gold Member Gold Member

    May 19, 2012
    Actually I avoid the areas with dinosaurs !!

    Thanks Boss ! You should post some pics of your adventures sometime !! Probably much wilder than mine :D

    Actually this is not quite right, your info is a bit out of date. The Bunyips have eaten all the Yowies around here. The Thylacine has gone extinct AGAIN because the Drop Bears kept landing on them. Drop Bears are the reason I wear a motorcycle helmet while bushwacking !! :D
     
  17. Currawong

    Currawong Gold Member Gold Member

    May 19, 2012
    Yep there's plenty of wildlife here. You don't see most of them during the day because they're nocturnal.

    I was lucky enough to have my first career (if you can call it that) as a forest ecologist in this part of Australia. Specifically I worked as a field ecologist focused mainly on spotlighting, trapping, tracking and the like to identify wildlife species living there. Some pics below of local wildlife (grabbed from random places on the internet)...

    Sugar Glider
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    Yellow-tailed black cockatoo
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    Swamp wallaby
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    Sooty owl
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    Greater glider
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    Koala
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    Spotted-tailed quoll
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    dman62 likes this.
  18. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 29, 2010
    Uncle Timbo, trevitrace and Currawong like this.
  19. Leonardo63

    Leonardo63 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 24, 2017
    LOL! OK, you guys got me into some heavy research so right about now I'm calling it 100% on the bull-sht-O-meter HAHA! I started reading about all these quite interestingly and started to realize not ALL of this may be quite accurate LOL!!! .... Now you got me freaked about drop-bears ;) . BUT! They are great stories that would make any non-native person's eye's go wide with intensity.
    Now sugar gliders, yeah, those are some cuties, I've seen where a lot of people have them as pets.

    I still, looking at these photos have to ask myself, how can anyone be positive the taz-Tiger is extinct? I recently read about a species of something long thought to be extinct caught on a camera in an ecological study.
     
  20. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 29, 2010
    Possibly the best evidence of a remaining population of Tassie Tigers has started to come out of Tasmania over the last few months. There is a good enough trail cam picture for there to be some investment in water DNA and scat samples in one specific area.

    Discount Drop Bears and Milats here at your pwn peril !!
     
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