Chris Reeve fixed vs. Swamp Rat -- opinions?

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I was thinking about a Chris Reeve vs. Swamp Rat. The Green Beret looks like a popular knife.

How would you think the Chris Reeve fixed blades compare to the Swamp Rat line?

Applications are camping and outdoors.
 
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cognitivefun said:
I was thinking about a Chris Reeve vs. Swamp Rat. The Green Beret looks like a popular knife.

How would you think the Chris Reeve fixed blades compare to the Swamp Rat line?

Applications are camping and outdoors.


For most things they'll probably serve you equally well.

The Swamp Rat will be a little stronger if you're going to abuse it and do any prying with it or something like that and won't make you feel as bad when you get it all scratched and beat up.

The Reeve will be a more finely made and visually attractive knife that you'll probably appreciate owning and using more. Careful though. Once you buy any Chris Reeve knife it'll spoil you and factory knives will never seem the same again. They're also addicting.
 
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I will agree with Fulloflead that Reeves are addicting. :)

However, I have to disagree on the Strength issue. I don't think there would not be any comparable difference in strength between a SRK and the Green Beret.

Now if you are considering one of the Reeve One Piece knives there might be a slight difference in the very tips, and though the Reeve tip may be thinner this is why I would choose the Reeve for general camp work, sharp point for great light cutting chores.

As far as scratching a Reeve up, they will completely refinish (Sandblast, re-Kalguard Coat the entire knife and resharpen it) any of their One Piece knives for about $20.00. I don't know if SRK refurbishes their knives (including re-coating their blades) or not but I would be interested to know if they do and what the cost is.
 

Ed T

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I agree that either knife would serve you well.
For camping, you might also consider the Nkonka.
The tool kit in the handle may prove useful for taking care of small problems.
I keep meaning to get one, but keep getting distracted.
 
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Ed T said:
For camping, you might also consider the Nkonka.
The tool kit in the handle may prove useful for taking care of small problems.

I've often wondered about that. I can think of about a dozen BETTER things to put in the handle of a camping knife.

Screwdrivers seem like a strange thing to put in the handle of a big fixed blade of all things. Like they wanted to manufacture something to put in the handles but couldn't think of what... or they got a deal on screwdriver parts. :confused:

Don't get me wrong. Reeves are my FAVORITE non-custom knives. I just can't wrap my mind around this one. :(
 
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I own and use both Chris Reeve and Swamp Rat knives, and I don’t think you could go wrong with either manufacturer.

I’d be looking at the one piece Chris reeves rather than the Green Beret though: the jury is still out on how much abuse S30V can take, but we know how tough the A2 in the one piece line is.

I’ve put pretty nasty stress on both Chris Reeves and Swamp Rats, and they both took everything with a smile. I think the flat grind on the SRs possibly provides a bit more lateral strength than the hollow grind on the CRKs.

There are two advantages with the SR knives (beyond price) worth considering: the resiprene C handles on many of the Swamp Rats are very comfortable, and you're not going to think twice about customising the micarta handles on something like the Ratweiler (where you are given plenty of material to smooth/shape).

David
 
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what would be the most popular choice of Swamp Rat as a starter knife? I know this is a general question with no right answer, just looking for your opinions. Thank you.
 
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I love my Tramp. It is VERY tough. I would probably love a Reeve knife as well, but one of the things I like best about my tramp is that it is...well...kind of ugly. I am not afraid to USE the darn thing. I don't think twice about it. A Reeve knife...well, I might not be so inclined to hack that branch or baton that log. Also, I cannot think of a handle material that would be better for hard usage than Resiprene-C. It just feels great in the hand.

I fell bad calling it ugly, but I am generally a function over form guy so that makes it PERFECT for me. I guess, in a way, that makes it beautiful!

Heck, some might just find it good looking anyway... :rolleyes:
 
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Of course the correct answer is to buy them both. Having said that someone has a used CR Mountaineer1 on the exchange for $140, that would be a GREAT starter knife.
 
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A Camp Tramp is big enough to be a good chopper, and small enough to be an effective slicer.

The Howling Rat is an incredibly versatile knife: 4.5" blade, excellent blade design, and an ergonomic handle.
 
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If I had a choice, I'd go with Chris Reeve. You can take off the scales and do a paracord wrap and the steel would hold up better to rust than Swamp Rat Sr101. If you want a pure chopper, you'd be better off with a cheap hatchet.
 
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My 15 year old Chris Reeve Shadow has no rust on it, and it is used regularly.

My Swamp Rat Ratweiler has seen a lot of work, and the protective coating is holding up well.

What do you want: stainless steel, or incredibly durable tool steel?

David
 
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I had a CRK Project 2. Traded it for a Sebenza. That thing was incredibly sharp and well made (so is the Sebbie). I also own most of the Swamp Rat line, love em. The Rats are easier to beat on just because of the price. I could never bring myself to use the P2 because my Camp Tramp being very close in size was and is my user (I use the Sebbie daily).

You can't go wrong with either company and unless you have no problems beating up on a high dollar knife, I'd say go with Swamp Rat. If you will actually use it, go with the CRK. The one that sees the most use of all is my Howling Rat. Just a very handy size/shape.

Rob
 

MelancholyMutt

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I bought a Reeve mountaineer about ten years ago... so early that it has a serial number. I've got 12 Reeves now... Like Lays Potato chips, you can't have just one!...
 

Ed T

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I was thinking along the lines of stoves, fishing reels, rifles, etc. I normally have my leatherman for these things, but if it was in the knife, that is one less thing to carry (read one less thing for me to lose).
 

MelancholyMutt

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Kaos said:
If I had a choice, I'd go with Chris Reeve. You can take off the scales and do a paracord wrap.

Well, if you're gonna take off the scales, you're not gonna do it in the field... Removing the scales required about two hours of work and very liberal use of solvents...
 
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Why would you want to take the scales off of a knife that might get used for food prep?

It's very hard to keep a wrapped handle clean, and to keep moisture away from the steel beneath the wrapping.
 
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I would go with the Swamp Rat. You have to hold them to believe how awesome they are. I am sure the Reeve's are nice knives, but Swamp Rats are so tough, and very affordable. I use my Howler every day. It is my favourite knife, it is just so handy!

Thor
 
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djolney said:
Why would you want to take the scales off of a knife that might get used for food prep?

It's very hard to keep a wrapped handle clean, and to keep moisture away from the steel beneath the wrapping.

I only meant that you've got more options if the scales can be removed but it doesn't necessarily mean I'd take em off unless it need be. I think that's better than having a rubber handle that can melt right off.
 
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OK. Thanks. That makes sense now.

I like the hollow fasteners on my Busse and Ratweiler: they allow you to tie the knife to things, and to easily attach a chord D guard to the knife.
 
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