Glue up

Discussion in 'Hammer & Tongs' started by HDCutlery, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. HDCutlery

    HDCutlery

    101
    Jan 12, 2016
    So I'm going on just under a year of making knives and I'm to the point I want to start using the "big boy" glues. I currently use Loctite 60 min slow cure since it's convenient and does a decent job as an all purpose epoxy. Now before anyone links it I have already gone over the glue wars though find it somewhat botched since no pins were used as there would be in a handle I would be making. I would just like to know what you ladies and gents recommend as well as the pros and cons of said products. Thank you for reading - Brian
     
  2. Stark Knives

    Stark Knives

    Mar 19, 2010
    I and a ton of other people use West System's G-Flex. Haven't had any problems with it yet. :)
     
  3. HDCutlery

    HDCutlery

    101
    Jan 12, 2016
    I've heard good things and am considering that and Acraglass to be the ones I test. I know some swear by glues with a kicker. Does anyone have experience with these?
     
  4. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    System Three T-88, and West System G-flex. You would be hard pressed to find a resin easier to get and stronger for our needs. Shelf like is excellent, too.

    For those who want another very strong choice, the two jar 24 hour resin Ken sells at K&G is also superb. I used it for years before switching to T-88, and more recently trying G-flex. I still think I prefer T-88 the most.

    To get professional results, the resin should match the wood. I have found the powder dyes that K&G sells the best for this. Just a knife tip of dye will color a batch of resin. A jar will last a very long time. Blending colors can match most any wood or liner. I stock black, white, tan, blue, green, and red. Of those, I have only had to replace the black and tan. The others are still the original jars from many years ago.
     
  5. HDCutlery

    HDCutlery

    101
    Jan 12, 2016
    That is a very good point. I plan on holding off on using any type of G10 liners until I get my air filtration up and running. Now I'm curious on the consistency of the G-flex as I like to minimize runout if at all possible
     
  6. The Gopher

    The Gopher

    176
    Mar 4, 2011
    I use T-88 and haven't had any issues.
     
  7. iBlade

    iBlade

    446
    Jul 24, 2008
    I use west system just the standard 105 and 205, does the job very well.
     
  8. scott.livesey

    scott.livesey

    Nov 10, 2011
    i think surface preparation and cleanliness is at least as important as brand name. products from West, Raka and others are formulated to hold boats together and keep windmill blades from breaking and airplanes from falling out of the sky. find a product that suits your needs as far as cure time, cure temperature, working time, viscosity, aroma, and dried appearance. more than likely Loctite sells the same brand you are using in 55 gallon drums for commercial use, they are not going to make a product that could fail and cause death or injury.
    scott
     
  9. psychophipps

    psychophipps

    757
    Aug 25, 2009
    As a person that worked at the interior plant for a major yacht manufacturer I can say that any of the good marine epoxies will do very well for your purposes. We used to joke that if a boat went down the owner could at least salvage all of the cabinetry.
    All joking aside, these materials all have "Cancer" listed as their main ingredient. Full respirators with good chemical filters during preparation, application, and definitely sanding is in order. The plant has to keep my employment records for 30 years by law, this stuff will get you if you're not careful.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
     

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