Hakata Bocho Inspired Kitchen Knife

Joined
Jul 19, 2011
Messages
83
My wife requested that I make her a general use kitchen knife (since I haven't made anything for her in 2 years :rolleyes:). I've always been drawn to the traditional Japanese style kitchen knives, and they have always been my preferred blade designs when I get kitchen time; so after researching many different styles, I was inspired by a style called the Hakata Bocho, a regional general purpose kitchen knife. This was my first hidden tang knife that I have attempted.

Specs:
1/8" thick O-1 tool steel at 61 HRC

Full taper grind from the spine, with a right hand chisel grind

Hidden tang Mortise construction w/ stabilized and dyed buckeye scales,
burgundy linen bolsters, and canvas and paper Micarta liners. My wife chose
the handle materials, and I like the way they turned out

Here's some pics...

Flat side showing my maker's mark
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Grind side of the knife with right hand chisel grind
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The bottom of the handle shows that the liner is thinner on the bottom due to full taper grind
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Spine shot shows that the liner is thicker on the spine side from the full taper grind
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Detail of the handle material
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Any comments welcome... Thanks
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
222
Like the very pure, apparently simple form and the refinement in the execution. Always love the kiritsuke tip. Is it some optical phenomena, or is the handle inclined at a few degrees??
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2012
Messages
172
I think it looks pretty nice. I think a double bevel might lend itself to a more multi purpose knife, but I like it.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2011
Messages
83
Update:

This one has been my wife's go to kitchen blade for the past month and a half. I wonder why I have not seen more kitchen knives made out of O-1 :D I have not had to do anything more than strop the edge a couple times to keep this thing scary sharp. It has been used to slice fruits and veggies, cut steaks, break down chickens, carve the thanksgiving turkey, and slice fish (sashimi style, but it's a little short for it). She said that the right-hand grind took some getting used to, but she now likes the precision.

The blade has developed a nice patina.
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Joined
Dec 5, 2012
Messages
12
O1 is a great kitchen steel! It's not very stinky, it gets very sharp, holds it very well and gets a beautiful patina. Not much else you can ask for!

The knife looks cool!
 
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