Have you ever owned a full height convex grind before?

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Mar 20, 1999
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I've been going through my knife history for several years to find something as a visual comparison. I don't think I've ever owned a knife with a full convex grind. I guess I actually have two questions...

1) I have a pictue archive of over 350 Busse pics and I can't say that any of them appear to have a full convex grind. Are they past Busse models with it that I'm just not thinking of at the moment?

2) Has anyone owned a knife with a full convex grind? If so which ones and can you post pics?
 
I was wondering about this myself. I don't know exactly what that would look like. I have a blade with a full height convex type grind. It's referred to as an appleseed grind. I think the difference is that the knife I have the edge is inclusive to the full grind. A zero edge if you will. I'm not sure if they are the same thing. I would imagine and hope that the grind Jerry described has a separate grind for the actual edge. The blade I have with the appleseed grind is hard to maintain. I have no problem maintaining a zero edge.
I'm interested to see this.
 
http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cach...p?Number=400496+fully+convex+edge+knife&hl=en

from mark steward regarding it - "It depends on the knife but most are at least 3/4 height Convex grinds."

http://barkriverknifetool.com/

for photo's that kind of show the grind.... i want that center one somethin feirce...
http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=309275&highlight=bark

the only one i have that has a convex anything (besides cutting edge bevel) = pure and ugly
dsc01914small.jpg



its really not as drastic as it seems. definitely makes it feel stronger then a regular full flat v grind, but not as strong as a low saber. it would be nice to have all the blades have it to be honest, but as was said, its much more labor intensive
 
I have a Fallkniven NL2 Odin, which has a full convex grind. It is one gradual curve from spine to edge, and there is no secondary bevel between the spine and edge.

It is the most beautiful and well made piece of laminated stainless steel I've ever owned, and you can find pictures of it on the Fallkniven website.

I keep it razor sharp with a steel and sand paper when necessary. IMO, you're in a world of trouble if you let a knife with a full convex grind get blunt, but if you keep it sharp it will stay scary sharp.

David
 
Yeah, it certainly looks like it would take a great edge. The problem is the one I have came dull as a letter opener and when you look down the edge it's wavy instead of a nice straight edge. It needs reground to be of any use to me. So, it actually is my desk letter opener.
 
"Yeah, it certainly looks like it would take a great edge. The problem is the one I have came dull as a letter opener and when you look down the edge it's
wavy instead of a nice straight edge. It needs reground to be of any use to me. So, it actually is my desk letter opener."

I think you just summed up why there are so few full convex grind knives: if it's not done properly the blade is absolutely useless, and difficult to fix.

David
 
The full convex gind has IIRC its origin in the japanese ancient handmade swords. They seem to be very labor intensive to apply ( or u need highly accurate CNC machining). If executed properly IMHO they will give u the best grind possible. The real problem comes when a customer wants to resharpen the knife himself. U cannot resharpen a appleseed grind with on of the commercial available sharpeners due to the constantly changing of the cutting edge geometry. U resharpen it with a soft sandpaper and a flexible base wich will form to the appleseed form , but u will ruin a Hamon or the whitening on the blade.
 
I think most of Bill Moran does his knives with a full convex grind.
I have had a few Moran Spydercos that have that grind & they are so thin & sharp the scare me.

I think if the new SJ was kept to 1/8" uncoated with a full hight convex grind it would be a slicing monster, but making it any thicker than 3/16" it would not really benifit from that grind.

That is just my 2 cents
Sorry Nimmi I know you wanted a 3/4" thick one but I just think it would be a safe queen then. :p
 
David Brown said:
That is just my 2 cents
Sorry Nimmi I know you wanted a 3/4" thick one but I just think it would be a safe queen then. :p


No problem Dave :) I'm getting a new SJ just to see the full convex grind. It sounds like a wonderful grind if done correctly.
 
i have a couple of the ken warner/blackjacks with that grind.
makes aus8 seem tuff. har!
 
I make full convex grind knives....as do quite a few knifemakers.

Probably 4 out of 5 knives I make are ground that way.

pics:


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They're actually easier to sharpen because you don't have to guess the angle on a stone - only to find out you had it wrong all along.

With a convex edge, you just strop it.....use sandpaper if it's beat up, leather if it just needs a touch up. It's easy to find the angle to strop at - just push the blade along a flat surface, raising the spine until the edge "catches". That's your angle. If you push hard, reduce it slightly. If you are stropping gently, keep it at the full level. Once you do it a few times, it's a piece of cake.
 
Yes, Mark - didn't think of that one....:eek:

I think I'll get going on a design for it tomorrow!


I missed my chance at some INFI when Jerry let some go to the knifemakers. Was very upset at that too.....(kicking self) Someday, my friend. Perhaps you could pull a leg/string/etc for me? :D :p

:eek:
 
Yes, of course.

But you'll probably want it differentially tempered. Not sure if Paul does that....
 
SethMurdoc said:
http://www.toolanddie.com/~smgr2/Me...&Product_Code=TLK-A2ON36&Category_Code=TLKGFS


mmmmmmmmmmmmm 3/4"x5"x36"

can heat treaters like paul bos heat treat something thats that broad at 3/4"-1" thick?



They should be able to do something that thick. You should consider 1/4" or 5/16" S7 before you look at that craziness. After playing around with a 1/4" S7 convex ground knife I do not think that a 5/16" one could be broken with just muscle power, not sure a 1/4 inch one can be. Sorry for the thread jack guys. :)
 
its got nothing to do with strength, as anything past 5/16" becomes a bother to use outside of the chopper range (poor penetration of tip, very wide seperation of materials, required high grind, or extremely deep hollow grind etc). id be going for thickness for weight. specifically - my own super saylan :D:D:D:D

looking for something in the 20-24" range at around 7-8lbs, double handed handle.

i figure you have to do it at least once...

and hey, if it worked out well, youd be the only guy in america (and possibly... the world! :eek: :rolleyes: ) actively producing 3/4"-1" thick blades. still gotta make a guts sword as well.

sorry for sending the thread in a totally off topic direction...

HOTSJ w/full convex grind would be pretty crazy though
 
to my knowledge jerry has never let infi blanks/stock into the public, or private secters for other company's/individuals to use.

if your refering to the bbsh1 blanks that were on the knifemaking equipment sale forum here on bladeforums, those were made of 5160 for use with knifemakers under the busse apprenticeship program.

though i could be wrong about the infi part
 
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