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Just found this snake in my basement. Can anyone accurately identify species?

Discussion in 'Busse Combat Knives' started by knife hunter, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. knife hunter

    knife hunter "Die Hard Hog" Moderator & Dealer Moderator Dealer / Materials Provider

    Dec 5, 2007
    Just found this snake in my basement. Can anyone accurately identify species?


    I fear that its a baby copperhead and that there could be more:eek:

    Please tell me its some kind of rat snake as I am still packing the basement:D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. phoenix&gryphon

    phoenix&gryphon

    29
    May 24, 2009
    Yep. Just a black rat snake.
     
  3. knife hunter

    knife hunter "Die Hard Hog" Moderator & Dealer Moderator Dealer / Materials Provider

    Dec 5, 2007
    you 100%?

    Thank you :)
     
  4. Tom Kanik

    Tom Kanik Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 18, 2003
    Here in Missouri that would be called a "glossy snake". Notice the solid black eye pupil? That means it is non-vemous as the pit-vipers have the split pupil .."snake eyes". But always better safe than sorry; take good care of your lovely family Trevor...;):thumbup:
     
  5. amdmaxx

    amdmaxx

    670
    Aug 28, 2012
    nice pet collection you have in the basement..
     
  6. 13ninjas

    13ninjas Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 2, 2009
    Definitely not a copperhead, they have slits instead of round pupils. If VA is like KY all the venomous snakes are nocturnal and have "cat like" eyes.

    Happy moving brother! :D
     
  7. knife hunter

    knife hunter "Die Hard Hog" Moderator & Dealer Moderator Dealer / Materials Provider

    Dec 5, 2007
    Sweet! I kinda hate he got stuck to the tape now, but I am sure the new owner will be happy if I never mention it;):D

    Thanks guys for your assistance and support lately.:thumbup:

    I am about to wrap things up and will be reunited with the family soon. Three weeks has been good, but about long enough. I look forward to all their drama;):D and soon:cool:
     
  8. phoenix&gryphon

    phoenix&gryphon

    29
    May 24, 2009
    Yes indeed. You are welcome. Good luck with the move.
     
  9. vitadura

    vitadura

    247
    Mar 16, 2012
    Watch out for the spiders, one looks like the violin spider or brown recluse
     
  10. w.t. anderson

    w.t. anderson Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 2, 2007
    It's a young black racer - here's some info:

    Common Name: Northern Black Racer
    Scientific Name: Coluber constrictor constrictor
    Etymology:
    Genus: Coluber is Latin for "snake".
    Species: constrictor is derived from the Latin words con which means "together" or "with" and strictus which means "drawn together" or "tight".
    Subspecies: constrictor is derived from the Latin words con which means "together" or "with" and strictus which means "drawn together" or "tight".
    Vernacular Names: American black snake, American racer snake, black chaser, black runner, blue racer, chicken snake, cow sucker, green snake, hoop snake, horse racer, slick black snake, true black snake, white-throated racer.
    Average Length: 36 - 60 in. (90 - 152 cm)
    Virginia Record Length: 70.7 in. (179.5 cm)
    Record length: 73 in. (185.4 cm)

    Virginia Fish and Wildlife Information Service: Species Booklet

    Photos:

    Juvenile - Prince William Co. (the adults turn more or less solid black) Obviously attracted to your snakewood-handled knives, better send them (and not the snake) to me. Best Wishes, Bloody Bill
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2012
  11. jeepin

    jeepin Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2003










    That appears to be of the dead snake species. You can usually tell, by the way the head is decapitated or else you will see them on roads, flattened much like a pancake would be:eek::D
     
  12. Havoc550

    Havoc550 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    654
    Oct 9, 2011
    Poor snake!! I hope he makes it...
     
  13. w.t. anderson

    w.t. anderson Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 2, 2007
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2012
  14. ddml

    ddml

    928
    Nov 4, 2009
    Beautiful plumage!
     
  15. cruelraoul

    cruelraoul

    494
    Jun 6, 2009
    I am not an expert on your part of the country, T, but in addition to the eyes that others noted, the head on that snake doesn't have the triangular structure I usually would look for to identify it as poisonous.
     
  16. tbdoc4kids

    tbdoc4kids Gold Member Gold Member

    699
    Apr 24, 2012
    Since you killed it, you probably will have rats and mice nibbling on your knife handles! I recommend distributing all your knives to other forum members to keep them safe. Let me know if I can assist you in this. :)

    The first indication for me that this was not a poisonous snake was the head shape, as raoul noted. I find that helpful, since it can usually be spotted from a distance.
     
  17. AZTimT

    AZTimT KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 15, 2009
    Hey T, the last I knew, every venomous snake in the eastern United States that is dangerous to people are some form of pit viper.

    This means that they have a triangular V(iper) shaped head that flares out like an arrowhead when viewed from above and the eyes have vertical slit pupils like a cat in the daylight.
    Neither the head nor the eyes of that snake are indicative of anything remotely dangerous to you or your family and could have even been made into an educational pet for the kids.
    That poor snake was probably doing a really good job of keeping rodents out of your basement while getting ready to survive the winter. It was probably one of the two below.

    For comparison from the Virginia Herpetological Society Rat Snake vs Copperhead
    [​IMG]

    And compared to a black racer
    [​IMG]

    The only exception in America that I know of is the small rainbow colored coral snake which gets confused with harmless king or milk snakes.
    The old saying that still applies in the US is red next to yellow, deadly fellow :thumbdn::eek: but red next to black, venom lack :thumbup: :D as seen in this pic).
    [​IMG]
    This site has good info on the coral snakes. http://www.reptilechannel.com/snakes/venomous-snakes/coral-snakes.aspx

     
  18. gatorzingo

    gatorzingo Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 9, 2006
    Looks like the start of a nice pair of coybow boots, or, a sheath for a Busse knife. Contact Armoralleather and Dwayne will set you up.
     
  19. masterj

    masterj

    328
    Feb 11, 2011
    As turtleman would say "look for them cat like eyes" Those look round to me. ;)
     
  20. Lycosa

    Lycosa

    Aug 24, 2007
    Killing a little snake like that!?
    Good gawd broh!!
    I will never open another "snake" thread! :D
     

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