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least chippy super steel

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by summerofgeorge1, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. summerofgeorge1

    summerofgeorge1

    9
    Sep 7, 2016
    Hi, sorry if his has been covered, and it probably has to some extent. I've tried a google search and a search within this forum, and can't find something that will directly answer my question.
    I'm looking for a super steel, that's also able to be taken out into the woods, and banged around, without getting chipped to hell. My first super steel ever, was the s30v, and it chipped to hell very quickly and easily.
    I'm thinking between S90V, M390, M4, D2, S110, and any others you may suggest. Consider all things equal, same producer of knife/steel, same heat treatment quality, etc. Could anyone give me a ranking of the super steels, in terms of their resistance specifically to chipping/snapping the tip, etc? I don't care about difficulty to sharpen or many other considerations, JUST that the knife isn't going to chip or snap under extreme duress and use. Please any rankings or recommendations on the current leading super steels. Thank you so much!
     
  2. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger

    Sep 20, 2015
    You mean like yeh ?

    [video=youtube;1w1_WX_fNN8]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1w1_WX_fNN8[/video]

    Personally I have been getting along famously with my S30V Para 2 ; no chips but that's just me. Stays sharp to.
    (cough, cough Manix S110V, cough, cough got dull again today after sharpening to hair whittling yet again . . . dull in one day . . . crap).
     
  3. jdm61

    jdm61 itinerant metal pounder Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 12, 2005
    If there is a comprehensive list, I would say it would probably include 3V, 4V, BD#1 and Vanadis 4E for non-stainless and S35VN, Elmax and CTS-XHP for stainless. I might not count out CPM 154 either.
     
  4. Ankerson

    Ankerson Knife and Computer Geek Platinum Member Gold Member

    Nov 2, 2002

    Most of what you are asking has more to do with blade geometry and less with the steel.

    And then throw in the other variables like heat treat and edge geometry etc.

    So we need more information on what you really want to know based on what you are planning to use the said knife for.
     
  5. jdm61

    jdm61 itinerant metal pounder Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 12, 2005
    Jim, I have seen one rather high end folder maker heat treat S90V in his shop and NOT use cryo. That seems like a moderately bad idea to me. You have to dot all of the I's and cross all of the T's with steel like that.
     
  6. Ankerson

    Ankerson Knife and Computer Geek Platinum Member Gold Member

    Nov 2, 2002
    They can get away with it if they really know what they are doing and are careful, but it's not recommended.

    Getting the best out of those HCV steels takes care for sure to get the best out of them.
     
  7. DeadboxHero

    DeadboxHero Triple B Handmade Knives, Big Brown Bear

    Mar 22, 2014
    Do some research on CPM 3v,Nathan Caruthers, Brad at Peters Heat treatment and Dan Kieffer

    Also there is Jerry Busse and his INFI steel and sr77 (s7), sr101 (52100)


    Search for those and you'll find your answer


    Just remember, the tougher you make a knife the less strength it has. You can't have everything
     
  8. summerofgeorge1

    summerofgeorge1

    9
    Sep 7, 2016
    It is difficult to find anything even remotely definitive, because so many varying opinions and experiences.
    So could I assume there's somewhat of a consensus that 3V is one of the absolute "toughest" 'super steels'? I was actually a little disappointed in the video posted of the 3V, it chipped to hell from the cinder block. I guess not much can withstand that kind of abuse....but are there any steels that COULD? Is there anything I could take into a survival situation in the wilderness for a month or so and be able to have any remote expectation of leaving the wilderness at the end without significant chips or cracks in the blade?


    Maybe a better way to phrase this question would be to ask: If you were going out into the wilderness for 2 months, and you could only bring one steel with you, what steel would you bring?
    I appreciate the replies, thank you
     
  9. DeadboxHero

    DeadboxHero Triple B Handmade Knives, Big Brown Bear

    Mar 22, 2014
    I would bring a sharpening stone and use my knife appropriately :D
    Also I would avoid any"wild" cinderblocks in the wilderness:D
     
  10. summerofgeorge1

    summerofgeorge1

    9
    Sep 7, 2016
    Haha, fair enough, good point. But what if you couldn't afford the extra weight and time consumption of a sharpening stone and trying to reprofile a blade for hours? Or what if you were choosing a knife that you hoped to use and yet pass on to your child in good condition years later, what steel would you expect to best hold up through the years?
    I was really disappointed by my first super steel blade, and want one that will really LAST, for years, of decent use, and maybe a trek or two into the woods.
     
  11. marthinus

    marthinus

    Dec 10, 2006
    Stainless - Nitrobe 77 or LC200N/Cronidur 30/ZFiNit or H-1, 14C28N and AEB-L

    Non Stainless - dont through away good old 52100, then INFI, Calamx, 3V, CruWear, good old S7.

    Options are really abundant.
     
  12. kurt6652

    kurt6652

    284
    Dec 9, 2008
    Spyderco's Vg 10 resists chipping well and it is easy to sharpen.
     
  13. jdm61

    jdm61 itinerant metal pounder Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 12, 2005
    Wasn't the cinderblock test where the blade chipped the "before' test?
     
  14. jdm61

    jdm61 itinerant metal pounder Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 12, 2005
    52100 preferably using the lower austenizing temp.
     
  15. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    INFI. Good for at least a few treks into the woods. ;)

    Sharpens easily. Tough as hell. Holds a great edge. You won't be able to break it, and neither will your kids, and probably even their kids.
     
  16. DeadboxHero

    DeadboxHero Triple B Handmade Knives, Big Brown Bear

    Mar 22, 2014
    Summerofgeorge1


    You can't afford the extra weight and time to sharpen so your willing to spend the extra work, effort and time to cut stuff?:confused:

    A wiseman once said "if I had 6 hours to cut down a tree I'd spend the first 4 hours sharpening my axe"

    Hey brother,

    Sharpening and proper cutting techniques plays a much bigger role then any super steel

    Trust me :)

    I'm a huge steel nerd myself. :D


    There is simply a limit to what any sharp knife and super steel can do.

    The laws of physics don't change with new alloys

    I can take any knife and sharpen it 45° per side and it will never chip
    But whats the point if I can't cut anything because it's too obtuse?


    A dull knife is very durable

    But

    What's the point of unlimited durability if I can't cut anything.

    Quite the paradox.

    If you want really sharp knives you have to care for your edges man
    No steel is going to change that.

    I know this isn't answering your question directly but I think this would help you more in the long run.:D
    I know It helped me when someone explained this to.me and thats what this place is for :D
     
  17. summerofgeorge1

    summerofgeorge1

    9
    Sep 7, 2016
    AntDog, thanks, that INFI looks good....but the knife choices that use the steel are too limited.

    DeadboxHero, thanks, sound advice. I still know relatively nothing about how to care for the edge. Definitely something I need to learn

    Well, to make this simpler maybe, can anyone recommend some reasonably priced ($90-225) knife that isn't brutally heavy or girthy, that can stand up to the test of time and torturous use, but is also an excellent performer? I'm kinda lookin at the Gayle Bradley(m4), the Paramilitary 2(s110v), and I love Benchmade(maybe something in m390), and willing to try Zero Tolerance or even Kershaw. 3V looks good, but like INFI, the selection of knives that can be found using it is too limited.
    I want something with a strong tip.
     
  18. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    Oh, so you're looking for a folder?
     
  19. summerofgeorge1

    summerofgeorge1

    9
    Sep 7, 2016
    Yeah, my bad, sorry, I actually should have specified that.
    I want a very rugged steel for a folder.
     
  20. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    M4. That'll do the job.
     

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