Modern folders for hunting?

Do you like modern folders for hunting?

  • Yes

    Votes: 6 37.5%
  • No

    Votes: 3 18.8%
  • I only use fixed blades

    Votes: 5 31.3%
  • I karate chop my deer apart instead to keep from scratching my knife

    Votes: 2 12.5%

  • Total voters
    16
  • Poll closed .

CVamberbonehead

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
930
So I got to thinking about the upcoming hunting season. I usually use a fixed blade for field dressing/butchering/skinning big game, and sometimes a traditional folder like a Trapper or a Buck 110. When I use a folder, I like the traditional ones because I think I can clean them out easier and they tend to cut nicely with their usually thin blades. Today though I was wondering, who on here uses modern folders for hunting and how do they work out for you? What knives do you use? I have modern folders that I'm sure would work well for the job, but I have never used one hunting.
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2002
Messages
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No, because modern folders are best suited for EDC and as such, the edges tend to be subject to constant TLC. If used on the wild, you could use it so often the edge will dull, and I hate the feel of a dull and expensive knife. Don't believe all those cutting and slicing tests. Skin and butcher even just a small-medium animal and your knife will dull. To me, a nice small fixed blade of a simple utilitarian steel that will restore sharpness on just one stone grit you carry is best for hunting.
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
22,162
C90FPBLE2_Both.png
 

MolokaiRider

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Joined
Sep 13, 2017
Messages
4,427
I've used folders for hunting and butchering. They work fine, even the super steels.

The only disadvantage for me is making sure the knife is cleaned thoroughly. Sometimes blood/bone chips, fat, etc gets caught up in the little nooks and crannies.
 
Joined
Oct 31, 2005
Messages
732
Nobody voting? I picked fixed blades as that's what I like to use when blood and guts are involved. It is so much easier to just wash a fixed blade off, wipe it dry and be done. Folders are fine for most chores, but it sure is simpler to just be able to slosh a fixed blade in a creek or whatever source of water is around, wipe it off and stick it back into the sheath than it is to try to wash crud out of a folder.
 

Lesknife

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2018
Messages
1,599
I’ve used my Buck Vantage pro a few times on smaller game and a coyote. If that’s what I had in a pinch I wouldn’t hesitate to use it on deer.
Cleaning em isn’t any harder than a fixed blade or a traditional trapper as I use Lysol disinfectant and Dawn dishwashing liquid in fairly warm water. Soak a few minutes and scrub brush then rinse and air dry. Then a drop or two of oil and it’s like nothing ever happened. I started out with traditional folders mostly stockman and never thought it strange because that’s what most of my family and friends used. I will admit when deer season was on that’s when the fixed blades would be more in fashion but lots more trappers and large folders of all kinds.
 

black mamba

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2009
Messages
18,046
I prefer fixed blades, but I have used modern and traditional folders as well. Modern abrasion resistant steels DO make a big difference, as a single deer will dull a 1095 blade, but I have done six deer using "Super Steels" (S90V @ 61 and CTS-XHP @ 65) and they only needed a stropping at the end to bring them back to shaving.
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2017
Messages
988
fixed blades for me. I've used folders, modern and traditional, from time to time and it reinforces the fact that I prefer fixed blades .
on some small game and birds I can work with a folder and not have much issue with cleanup
 

CVamberbonehead

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
930
Nobody voting? I picked fixed blades as that's what I like to use when blood and guts are involved. It is so much easier to just wash a fixed blade off, wipe it dry and be done. Folders are fine for most chores, but it sure is simpler to just be able to slosh a fixed blade in a creek or whatever source of water is around, wipe it off and stick it back into the sheath than it is to try to wash crud out of a folder.
Yeah, not to mention drying the folder afterwards so that it doesnt rust inside of a complex locking mechanism.
 

CVamberbonehead

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
930
No, because modern folders are best suited for EDC and as such, the edges tend to be subject to constant TLC. If used on the wild, you could use it so often the edge will dull, and I hate the feel of a dull and expensive knife. Don't believe all those cutting and slicing tests. Skin and butcher even just a small-medium animal and your knife will dull. To me, a nice small fixed blade of a simple utilitarian steel that will restore sharpness on just one stone grit you carry is best for hunting.
This is a big issue for me, I worry that if damaged the edge of my knife on a bone or something that a modern super steel type of knife may be impossible to sharpen back in the field.
 

CVamberbonehead

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
930
Ive heard that the Stretch was designed as a hunting knife, but I have to wonder if the designer ever gutted an animal. Flat, thin, sort of raspy plastic handles cant be comfortable for long sessions of skinning and such, can they? Plus I feel like cleaning that thing out would be a nightmare! Do you worry about the knife coming unclipped from your pocket when youre out in the woods?
 

CVamberbonehead

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
930
fixed blades for me. I've used folders, modern and traditional, from time to time and it reinforces the fact that I prefer fixed blades .
on some small game and birds I can work with a folder and not have much issue with cleanup
I have had the same experience basically. Birds (unless its a big bird like a goose or turkey) and some small game dont really make too much of a mess.
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
196
My preference is fixed blades, but my first deer was field dressed with a Gerber Gator, my last was field dressed with a Cold Steel mini Recon. All do the job.
 

fargo203

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2013
Messages
141
I primarily used fixed for easier clean up. Early season is not bad but all that fat in the late season can be a pain during clean up. I do have an older Case folder that was my grandfathers hunting knife. I usually will do one deer a year with it
 

tiguy7

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Messages
7,426
A modern folder with a Titanium handle, Stellite blade, and open back is easy to clean and will not rust. image.jpeg
 
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