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Old Style Washers - lubrication

Discussion in 'Chris Reeve Knives' started by OLd_gUY, Apr 16, 2018.

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  1. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Hi Guys,
    I recently acquired a Sebenza 21 Eyes (B/D 9/21/2009 - no Idaho Stamp) in what I feel was a very fair deal. Which is pretty cool in itself since I've want a CRK since I first read about them in the early '90s in Outdoor Life or something like that. Finally got one!
    Anyway, curiosity got the best of me and out came the Torx drivers and off came the scales.
    Inside I found the old style washers and I began to think about reassembly and lubrication.
    More specifically, since there are no perforations, whether to use fluorinated grease or something like Nano-Oil 10.
    My take is that the perforations are meant to take advantage of the properties of what CR feels is the optimal lubricant for his knives.
    But since there are no perforations, wouldn't a good lubricant of the type that was used when the knife was manufactured be more appropriate?
    I know that some may feel that sending the knife in for washer replacement is called for - but I'd kinda like to keep it old school - being an OLd_gUY and all.
    So, what do you folks think? Thank you in advance for any input.
     
    bhyde likes this.
  2. Peter Hartwig

    Peter Hartwig Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 29, 2008
    I would not change the washers at this time. They are fine until worn out IMO. Many prefer them to the newer washers, but that is open to debate.
    CRK's of that period used fluorinated grease just as the newer style washers(believe they have had 2 perforated style washers since the solid). I have always used the CRK grease on my Sebenzas with varying washers. Very little grease is needed.
    Congratulations on your new knife-Enjoy
     
    JNewell, bhyde and OLd_gUY like this.
  3. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Obviously I wasn't aware of that. Thank you.
    OG
     
  4. rycen

    rycen Super Moderator Staff Member Super Mod

    Aug 22, 2002
    Torx?
     
  5. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    HAH!! I was wondering why I was having such a tough time! :confused:
    Uhh, the allen wrench is right next to them? :rolleyes:
    I'm old?
    The light was in my eyes?
     
  6. Lapedog

    Lapedog Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 7, 2016
    On my CRKs I much prefer nano oil to the flourinated grease. They have the perforated washers. I find nano oil gives a much freer action than the grease. They are both fine lubricants tbough.

    When lubricating with oil it is important to only use a drop. I find the ideal ammount is just to put a drop on each side and inside the pivot hole on the blade. Then I spread those drops around the tang of the knife around and in the pivot hole with a q-tip. With oil less is more. Too much oil will attract dirt which ultimately gums up the action.
     
    OLd_gUY likes this.
  7. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Thank you Lapedog
     
  8. FourD

    FourD Gold Member Gold Member

    95
    Nov 30, 2017
    CRK used grease before perforating the washers. Use the grease... sparingly. Most of the resistance in a Sebbie is usually from the detent and not the pivot.
     
  9. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Thanks FourD. That goes with what I've been reading. I've also read about putting a drop of oil on the ball. Any thoughts about that?
     
  10. bhyde

    bhyde UNNECESSARY EVIL Staff Member Super Mod Moderator Platinum Member

    Mar 19, 2002
    I have never done that, but I can imagine that it would only attract dirt. Once the track is formed, it will get smoother.
     
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  11. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Hadn't thought of that. Good point. Thank you.
     
    bhyde likes this.
  12. brownshoe

    brownshoe I support this site with my MIND

    Sep 6, 2002
    I use the grease, and if I remove the lock bar tension, the blade falls freely. I don't think you can get more "freer action" than that. The lady I talked to at CRK says the grease is not onlly for lubrication but to protect the assembly from corrosion.
     
    OLd_gUY likes this.
  13. u812

    u812 Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 15, 2002
    I polish the washers lightly with flitz and use Militec-1 for lube. Smooth as glass.
     
    OLd_gUY likes this.
  14. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Another good point, thank you.
     
  15. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Thanks, I polished them on a strop. Nice lanyards!
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
  16. JNewell

    JNewell Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    Do not replace the washers. Use fluorinated grease similar to what was originally used and sold by CRK. Why make the simple hard?
     
    OLd_gUY likes this.
  17. JNewell

    JNewell Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    A curious thought, since neither titanium nor bronze are likely to corrode much? :D

    Actually, Torx will often work in hex recess. Not recommended - tool and fastener damage can result, but I've done it, too, and I bet others here have as well, if they're honest. ;)
     
    OLd_gUY likes this.
  18. OLd_gUY

    OLd_gUY Gold Member Gold Member

    351
    Feb 20, 2018
    Thank you. I don't plan on replacing the washers until there is no life left in them which is why I'm asking for ideas of lubricants. Which "fluorinated grease similar to what was originally used and sold by CRK" would you recommend? I've been looking at Christo-Lube MCG 111 just because it's available in a syringe type applicator (less is more).
     
  19. brownshoe

    brownshoe I support this site with my MIND

    Sep 6, 2002
    They way I think she said it works, is the grease stops moisture from getting to the steel parts.
     
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  20. JNewell

    JNewell Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    OK, and I'll take some *duh* demerits for overlooking that! :eek:
     
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