STELLITE 6K

Cobalt

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 23, 1998
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17,262
Alright all you stellite knife owners...make your comments here or forever hold your peace, that means you Rob C., Cliff, Kit and many more.

 
I don't own a Stellite knife. And I don't own a Talonite knife. All I know is that Stellite was Waaaay better than Talonite. Talonite is a Human invention. Stellite is made from the stuff of Stars.

No comparison really. Just because they are almost the same thing does not Make them the same thing. Does it?

Para is soooo confused, I think I'll stick with plain carbon steels. They seem to cut right to the heart of the matter.

What does cobalt have to do with this subject anyway? Are you baiting us, is the line out, who will take first bite?

Paracelsus, wondering around unsupervised......again
 
Stellite Rules
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I like 6K.

Over a year ago, I did some cutting tests on 1/2" sisal rope with a battery of knives. I used a 2" section of blade on each knife, which included 440C, ATS 34, Boye dendritic steel, Cobalt 6BH, 52100 and several others. The test was to see how many pieces each blade would cut and still shave. The rope was held by a clamp at one end, my hand holding the other end taught, with the rope cut in a slicing motion against a wood plank backing. At 100 cuts, three of the blades would still shave. One was of 440C, and would just scrape hair. Another was a Boye flat ground hunter which would also still scrape hair. Another was a very thin blade of AUS 8A made by AG Russell, which would not shave but would still cut aggressively due to its very thin profile. The only blade with which I could tell no significant difference between the first cut and the 100th was a Stellite 6K Gerber hunter, which was one of a limited edition of 200 knives commissioned by Deloro Stellite in about 1995. Still popped hair.

You can see Cliff Stamp's review of the same knife on his website, which I think makes for some very interesting reading.

--Will
 
paracelsus, please learn something about knives man, so you can intelligently discuss subjects like these. Look at Kit and Robs posts and even my follow up here and see how easy it is to sound important;
STELLITE RULEZZZ!
 
JoHnYKwSt,
There you go using them big words again. You know Rob and I will lose hours of shop time looking for a dictionary.

 
Dang Kit, you werent supposed to tell anyone about the dictionaries!
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Plethora is a flower or something isnt it?
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I learned that cool "plethora" word from reading the Mad Dog forums a while ago. I think Kevin would use that word a lot.
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Tom, you are correct, I am the king
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But back to the subject. Cobalt RULEZZ
 
When Kit decides to make the med. Mod 18 w/Talonite blade & Carbon Fiber handles ordered a while ago I'll have a unique opportunity - a few years ago I acquired a med. Mod. 16 drop-point in Stellite from Kit - a comparison between the two! Same size, same maker - Oh Hell! the only thing that would prove is that Cobalt rulezz! And we already know that!!!!

Bill
P.S. Kit- any time frame yet? I'm curious, not impatient - Rob can tell you I'm very patient especially when I know how nice the item is going to be.
 
Hell, Will liked it so much he had his Stellite forged to shape and cut washers out of a Buick hood...

I have an old penknife from my grandad that has a Stellite blade and it hardly ever needs sharpening. Its from the 1930's or so and after 70 years, not a spot of rust on the blade. The bolsters are a different matter... He used it in all sorts of chemicals and stuff you really wouldn't want to know about as he ran a funeral home for 50 or so years and embalmed folks for a living... I would say it is decent enough stuff.
 
Will :

The only blade with which I could tell no significant difference between the first cut and the 100th was a Stellite 6K Gerber hunter, which was one of a limited edition of 200 knives commissioned by Deloro Stellite in about 1995.

Out of all the cobalt blades I have worked with (Talonite stock removal and forged, Dendritic Cobalt, Stellite 6k, and some unknown variant {chisel marked simply as Stellite]) the 6K knife from bladeforums members Will York and Cobalt (same blades from Gerber) are easily the most impressive materials wise.

The Dendritic Cobalt blade from Boye has a much more efficient cutting geometry, no surprise there, but it a little too brittle and weaker than the 6K as well, simply because it is cast. Dendritic 440C is much more durable, but still not as durable as Stellite 6K.

Of course Dendritic 440C is not near the top in terms of durabilty when it comes to high end steels. There are many steels which are as durable as 6K, moreso in fact and are stronger as well. Not as corrosion resistant though, and they will wear quicker in "dirty" work, gritty materials, rock, metals, scraping, that kind of thing.

I have loaned some blades to friends who are divers and it is rare to get them back with a functional edge on them because of the poking, scraping and prying that it done on materials that are much more abrasive than what I usually cut which is wood and rope and such. I think I will loan them my Talonite blade later on and see how it fares.

The thing that I have been tossing about lately is getting a decent large 6K chef's knife. It has a very nice set of properties for such use, near ideal in fact. Cost is the only thing though. If you compare it to say a 420 (mod) blade from say Phil Wilson, which also has very good strength and toughness, how much of an advantage are you getting for your money, which I assume would be significantly different.

It would be interesting to see a long term use report and verify what if any is the functional difference in the "lifetime" of both blades.

-Cliff
 
Cliff; you are aware of the Talonite chef's knife that Rob Simonich made and then had two professional chefs try out in their restaurants?

They raved about the knife, it is still in use in Nick Blinoff's restaurant. I suspect that a Stellite chef's knife would be excellent as well. Walt
 
Originally posted by Walt Welch:
you are aware of the Talonite chef's knife that Rob Simonich made and then had two professional chefs try out in their restaurants?
I've read about that. Interesting. Thugh I think depends what was being cut,
if it's just vegitables & meat(no bones), then even very brittle ceramic blades would last very long time.
In other words, I suspect Talonite won't perform as well as high end steel o hard materials, such as bones, for example.
Correct me here if I am wrong
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Cobalt alloys are not the same as Steel, I guess I wouldn't expect the same behavior.

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[This message has been edited by Gator97 (edited 09-22-2000).]
 
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