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What did you rehang today?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Irongun324, May 1, 2013.

  1. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Woodcraft, something I didn't get: did you install the wedge on the first day like in a "normal hang", before recessing it in the second?

    Does the paint thinner in the mix contribute in any way towards this "custom hang", or is it just a mix you use routinely?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft Gold Member Gold Member

    604
    Nov 7, 2016
    Yes, like a normal hang. I trim it for length, exactly as long as the kerf. And trim it for width. And shave it down for thickness if need be. Then I soak it in blo. Then pound it in until it doesn't want to go in any more. And that should be about flush if everything was properly prepared. Then the next day I convince it that it wants to go further.
    I used to set it up to be recessed to begin with. So cutting the wedge short. I was ok at judging I guess, but I had one come loose. Funny thing is the wedge was sliding up but getting stopped by the swollen proud part of the handle. And the head managed to get about a quarter inch or a little more of play but kept getting stopped by the same thing. I think eventually the wedge worked it's way up to flush with the handle. Unfortunately I was working so I just sawed the handle flush and drove in a metal secondary wedge to finish the day. It held fine. When I took it apart it turns out I had made the wedge to short for the kerf. Even recessed. So my bad. As well as it was a pretty spongy wedge.
    So now I just make the size of the kerf, no guess work.
    As far as the paint thinner, this is the first time with this mix. I usually just use straight blo. It soaked in and dried up in record time. Lol. I will have to get a couple more coats on to see if it is a good method for me.

    I had a bunch of ax handles warp. I some axes in a put box to protect them from what was going on in that area. Then I forgot. It was hot and humid for a couple of days and I take care of my handles, so they were not dry. Talk about stupid right? When I remembered and pulled them out, they were warped beyond anything I wanted to deal with.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  3. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Thanks so much for the details! Answered some earlier questions I had, greatly appreciated.

    As for warping, I managed to warp a handle before getting to hang a head on it :). Stored too close to a heat source...in winter. How's that for stupid, I thought I'd dry the wood faster...before I knew better.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  4. traditionalist

    traditionalist

    82
    Jul 20, 2014
    Re Hung my Flint Edge "Best Axe Made" 5lb CT pattern on the 30 inch handle I had. I also made a quick sheath for it (Still have to finish the edges). Sheath is around 12 oz leather, with a full welt. The strap was re used from an old rucksack.
    [​IMG]
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    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
    Java_Dude likes this.
  5. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    495
    Mar 31, 2016
    i just went to a thing for the boy scouts, i helped the kid in the axe yard up there and they have some jewels, and ticks... ANYWAY, the had 3 nice diston perf lance saws with handles i'v never seen before, they loosen then twist off. they have 2 pegs so they can only fit bucking saws. but anyway, they had a few collins virginia patterns, a flint edge, Kelly perfect and a warren. and a bunch of no names. the kid didnt know what he was doin so i helped. the thing is, they bought boys axe handles and a few full size handles. when i got there there was a woodslasher sitting on a 24" boys handle. i literally lifted the head off. we got most of them fixed up and i split quite a bit of the wood they had. it was big, old growth poplar. and the chopping blocks were 4 feet wide. probly poplar too.
     
  6. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Looks good, not to mention I also like to reuse stuff, instead of throwing away, when possible.
     
  7. cooperhill

    cooperhill

    Nov 14, 2011
    Two Emerson & Stevens Mfg. co "Forest King" axes that needed rehanging. One a CT and the other a double bit. Used a kiln dried pine wedge (that I cut myself) for the CT and an ash wedge for the double. Tested the single out yesterday and works smashingly.

    [​IMG]

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    cityofthesouth, Agent_H and Woodcraft like this.
  8. junkenstien

    junkenstien Basic Member Basic Member

    31
    Feb 15, 2017
    3lb true temper worlds finest 20170501_192051.jpg 20170501_192051.jpg
     
    Agent_H and Square_peg like this.
  9. rjdankert

    rjdankert Basic Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    Now that looks like a sheath that won't be "compromised". :thumbsup:
     
    traditionalist likes this.
  10. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Cooperhill, those are terrific looking axes. The swell on the single bit made me zoom up some.

    The fact that you use them along with having a good eye comes across.

    Great photos as well :thumbsup:
     
    cooperhill likes this.
  11. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Woodcraft likes this.
  12. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Great pairing, JB.
     
    spike116 likes this.
  13. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    Thanks, I've had that handle for a long time and didn't think that I'd find a more appropriate hatchet head for it.

    The handle is high quality in every way. I don't know what these cost when new (in today's dollars), but any current products truly are embarrassing compared to what was once standard and common. These handles were turned out in the millions but today somehow it can't be done. :thumbsdown:
     
    Java_Dude, Square_peg and quinton like this.
  14. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft Gold Member Gold Member

    604
    Nov 7, 2016
    I spent quite some time carving out a piece of Ash 34" for a Plumb. It was real pumpkin wood. Apparently some fast growth stuff. Nothing but headaches and spongyness. So I chucked it and used a #2 handle from beavertooth.
    Not the best grain wise, it's gong to be a worker;)

    This is as far as the softwood wedge was going, you can feel and hear when it's done. Also it blew a chunk off to the side. That's a sign.

    [​IMG]
    Seated head, before wedge.
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    After cutting it flush, sanding it, and more blo.
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    [​IMG]
    Pre wedge
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    Wedged, trimmed, blo.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Got a little gap up front. This ax has been abused!
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    Tomorrow I will try to "convince" the wedge to become recessed.
     
  15. James w

    James w Basic Member Basic Member

    842
    Aug 6, 2015
    I have a quick question for y'all experts of tried rehanging this hammer twice and both times when I wedged it the handle split on the othe side down the middle am I doing something wrong ? Maybe too thick a wedge?
     
  16. Derzelas

    Derzelas

    230
    Nov 23, 2015
    Norlund 3.5lbs on 36" straight handle (34" in total after)

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    Last edited: May 10, 2017
    Square_peg likes this.
  17. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    The wedge is designed to lock the handle on to the head via expansion, but only at the front on the eye and not the back. A saw kerf for a wedge rarely extends beyond 3/4 of the way through an eye. If the wedge is too thick (shouldn't be very much or any thicker than the saw kerf at the tip) and especially if the handle is too thin (ie overly loose) the expansion then exerts force on to that portion of the handle behind the eye. Aim for a relatively snug fit at the shoulder even before you start setting a wedge.
    There are folks out there that swear by induced splits for wedging instead of sawed kerfs but that's an invitation to have whatever split you induced travel the full length of the handle.
     
  18. James w

    James w Basic Member Basic Member

    842
    Aug 6, 2015
    Kk thx !
     
  19. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    What kind of hammer is it?

    The taper on them is different than an axe many times in that they can be kind of an hourglass shape. Too far and you kind of pass that point of spreading it halfway to make it hold the head on to below that midpoint to spreading it at the base too much.

    I've split hammer handles when I've cut the kerf too deep, wedge was a little too big, or when the kerf was cut almost in line with the wood grain.

    Recently I have taken to cross wedges on smaller hammers - don't know if it's necessary though.

    [​IMG]

    Then there is always those last two smacks too many...

    Also I've found shaping handles when I drink seems to work out but many times I will wedge my work in the morning :)
     
    quinton likes this.

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