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You just never know what's under all that rust...ADDED PICS

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Casehardn, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. Casehardn

    Casehardn

    46
    Nov 14, 2011
    I found two small hatchet heads at the flea market. One was rusted up pretty bad, the other not quite so bad.
    Each went into a vinegar bath for about 60 hours.

    Ended up with a nice Dayton/Delaware type pattern on one. Feels about 1-1/2 lbs. Only says "Cast SteeL' on the head.

    The one that was real rusted up ended saying "Made in Sweden". I think there is less pitting on the surface of the moon. There is what looks to be a 1-4 on the other side. Maybe 1-1/4 lbs?

    Either way, I figure I'd start with the Dayton and post pics as I restore it. I picked up a nice piece of pistaccio wood for the handle. So far I only ran them over a wire brush and then a 3M belt. More to come...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  2. bearhunter

    bearhunter

    Sep 12, 2009
    a little pitting builds character in an axe :p:

    nice finds regardless of a little pitting...
     
  3. Casehardn

    Casehardn

    46
    Nov 14, 2011
    Bear,
    I'm going to take your advice and do a mild restore on that one. I have a neighbor with a bead blaster. He says he can adjust the force of the unit so it doesn't hurt the finish underneath. Maybe I'll drop that one off with him while I work on the other.
     
  4. Casehardn

    Casehardn

    46
    Nov 14, 2011
    Just finished the first hatchet.
    Picked out a piece of Pistaccio wood, made a sketch to follow and carved out a rough handle.
    Then I sanded out the details and fit the head to it. Very secure fit. Took down a 5 inch beech tree in about 2 minutes.
    Head stayed nice & tight. Now I need to make a sheath for it. 5 Pics posted below.
    [​IMG]
    http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/o605/Casehardn/P1000896.jpg
    http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/o605/Casehardn/P1000897.jpg
    http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/o605/Casehardn/P1000898.jpg
    http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/o605/Casehardn/P1000899.jpg

    Will work on number 2 hatchet next.
     
  5. Blunt Forged Edge

    Blunt Forged Edge

    591
    May 15, 2012
    Nicely done! Say, did you use a sander/grinder or by hand? Just curious that's all.
     
  6. SR69

    SR69

    238
    Apr 30, 2012
    Good stuff!

    Love it.

    What's the finish?
     
  7. bearhunter

    bearhunter

    Sep 12, 2009
    that is one beautiful handle!
     
  8. Casehardn

    Casehardn

    46
    Nov 14, 2011
    Head was with a sander. Very slow process and light pressure so no heat build-up.
    The handle was carved with a draw knife and then put on the sander.
     
  9. Casehardn

    Casehardn

    46
    Nov 14, 2011
    The finish is sanded with 600 grit, then I use Danish oil (2 coats). When the wood won't absorb more oil, I complete with a beeswax rub.
     
  10. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    It's beautiful. Pistachio did you say? Looks great.
     
  11. AeroNautiCal

    AeroNautiCal

    Jun 24, 2008
    That's lovely! [​IMG]

    Gorgeous handle.
     
  12. KP

    KP Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Oct 24, 2011
    Nice find, great restoration and beautiful work on the handle!
     
  13. jds1

    jds1 Basic Member Basic Member

    Jun 9, 2007
    Very nice work!

    Jeff
     

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