Knifemaker Pen Recs Needed

JLTX

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
55
Good evening, I apologize in advance if this request for recs is in the wrong forum. If so, please direct me and I will move the thread.

I want to purchase a couple of knifemaker pens for an intern of mine that is graduating college this winter. I am looking for the following and would love any/all recs. Thank you in advance!

-Cost: up to $250 per pen
-Type: no fountain, but ones that would take Fisher space pen refills
-Color/Style: appropriate for a professional office culture. No loud colors, skulls, flames, etc…🤣🤣🤣
-Time: readily available so that I can deliver in person late December at graduation.
-Condition: new

Sorry for the nitpicking, but I am clueless here and would love your insight and experience with any knifemaker 🖊.

I appreciate your time!
 

sgt1372

Platinum Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2018
Messages
2,741
I like the Hinderer branded pen that I carry for both writing and SD. Have no idea who actually makes it but it's a good pen that uses a Fisher refill.

There are alot of different types of Hinderer pens that are offered for sale wc you can find on many different sites online. Cost for mine was around $80 but you can pay more or less if you like, depending on the style/site that you like.

BTW, the only other pen of "value" that I've ever purchased was a Mont Blanc (both a fountain and ink pen). Still have them but never use them, unlilke the Hinderer that I carry every day.
 
Last edited:

mwhich50

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Jan 18, 2011
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3,137
Knife exchange>Wanted to buy>Gadgets and gear. Maybe you find one BNIB for a more reasonable price.
 
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Everybody's going get him a pen. Why don't you get him a kinfemaker knife? With 250 smackeroos, you could get him something really nice.
 

midnight flyer

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Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
2,995
Best of luck to you. I have haunted this place for a few years and haven't heard of a knifemaker of repute that also sells pens as part of his swag/gear. Remember if you are having a knifemaker pen and include a logo, make sure you have their permission!

I made several hundred when the pen craze was white hot, but quit because of burnout and the fact that everyone was making them. I used expensive kits, some made with real gold, and most were modeled after the classic pens of the 30s. I made them to order with different materials if requested by the customer. For example, when the local 2AA baseball team won their championship, I made quite a few pens from a broken bat from the championship game given to me for that purpose by the team owner.

I made pens from pieces of wood from historic homes I remodeled. Pens from moose antler for a couple of friends of mine that were Teddy Roosevelt fans. I bought a few ebony blanks here locally and made a coal black ebony pen as a presentation gift with the presenter's name lasered into it and backfilled with gold material. It was a nice little side business that I enjoyed.

Then high school shop classes, boy scout projects, and retirees started selling them for nothing. Guys that liked writing instruments (which have fallen out of favor!) would rather carry a project pen from their son or a charity group than to spend 5X that much for a great instrument.

I would try ETSY, as I know some still make pens, and you might get them to make you one to order. You requirements are tough, as the most guys selling pens only make the moderately priced offerings. BUT, if you can find someone with the right mandrels and jigs, there are kits available. Check here.

Good luck.

Robert
 

Dadpool

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Joined
May 18, 2015
Messages
4,451
If you can budge on the Fisher refills, the Fellhoelter TiBolt is stellar. The regular-size TiBolt takes Schmidt easyFLOW 900 refills, which I prefer to Fisher anyway. The tolerances on this pen are incredible (you won't know how to unscrew it just by looking at it, because that join is so perfect), the action is a ton of fun, and it holds up to regular use.

I bought mine six years ago, and have never bought a nice pen after that -- because I just want to use this one all the time, so that's what I do. It still looks, and writes, like new; you will be able to bury me with this pen.

L2qPR3i.jpg
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2007
Messages
255
If you can budge on the Fisher refills, the Fellhoelter TiBolt is stellar. The regular-size TiBolt takes Schmidt easyFLOW 900 refills, which I prefer to Fisher anyway. The tolerances on this pen are incredible (you won't know how to unscrew it just by looking at it, because that join is so perfect), the action is a ton of fun, and it holds up to regular use.

I bought mine six years ago, and have never bought a nice pen after that -- because I just want to use this one all the time, so that's what I do. It still looks, and writes, like new; you will be able to bury me with this pen.

L2qPR3i.jpg
Another +1 for the TiBolt unless you needed to have a more professional looking pen with a cap. FYI, the TiBolt can take Fisher refills with the included adapter (Parker format). I've got a Fisher in my TiBolt. The newer ones with the smoother, more polished stonewashed finish is super nice. Much better, IMO, compared to the ones from the very first batch that had a darker and rougher stonewash.

Though, if you really can look past the Fisher refill, I'd say the Prometheus Alpha Executive is the way to go. Granted, it's not a knifemaker pen since the guy makes lights; however, out of all the milled/turned pens out there, I think it's one of the best looking and fit your other requirements. The Ti one is right at the $250 mark without additionally engraving or anodizing.
 

sgt1372

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Joined
Oct 16, 2018
Messages
2,741
Best of luck to you. I have haunted this place for a few years and haven't heard of a knifemaker of repute that also sells pens as part of his swag/gear.

You don't consider Hinderer "a knifemaker of repute"?
 

Knives&Lint

F everything and become a pirate
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May 10, 2013
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1,514
I'm far from an expert at pens, but I've been pleased with my DDR (Darrel Ralph) pen. Takes Fisher refills, but not sure about current availability. Mine is flamed (not flames ;)) Ti, but tasteful, and there are also more subdued options. Anyhow, you said any all recs, so


0jNo1aE.jpg
 

Weasipoint

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Aug 8, 2019
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491
I've carried a DDR go pen for over a year now. They go for $110-$150. I love mine and use it everyday at work, get alot of compliments when ppl see it. I'm very picky about my pens and searched for a while before getting this one. My favorite part is that it's a click pen, so can use one handed easier and no cap to lose Knives&Lint Knives&Lint good to see someone else appreciates them!!
QiogEJp.jpg
 

Planterz

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
21,823
Good evening, I apologize in advance if this request for recs is in the wrong forum. If so, please direct me and I will move the thread.

I want to purchase a couple of knifemaker pens for an intern of mine that is graduating college this winter. I am looking for the following and would love any/all recs. Thank you in advance!

-Cost: up to $250 per pen
-Type: no fountain, but ones that would take Fisher space pen refills
-Color/Style: appropriate for a professional office culture. No loud colors, skulls, flames, etc…🤣🤣🤣
-Time: readily available so that I can deliver in person late December at graduation.
-Condition: new

Sorry for the nitpicking, but I am clueless here and would love your insight and experience with any knifemaker 🖊.

I appreciate your time!

But what kind of pen? Retractable or with a screw-on cap? If retractable, would you prefer a clicky, twist, or bolt action? Are you looking for something that's basically a really nice version of a regular pen that you'd find at anyone's desk or by the phone, or something more elegant that someone in a suit would use to sign contracts or that someone would do journaling with?

The Darrell Ralph (DDR) Go Pens (there's a couple pictured above) are good candidates for a high-quality clicky style pens. I have a couple, both titanium, one with a titanium tip one with a copper. The copper tip one I did have to ream out a bit to get a Fisher fine refill to fit through. I personally feel like the titanium ones have a very good balance and weight; if you have a Zebra F-701, it's pretty close to the same diameter and weight. You can get them in stainless steel too, if you want something heavier, or even full copper. The clip is very strong and won't over-bend easily (you can bend it back if you need to), and replacements are available. The click mechanism is a Schmidt SKM-88 (very commonly used for this type of semi-custom pen), which is smooth, relatively quiet, reliable, and very inexpensive to replace should the unlikely need ever arise.

I can also heartily recommend Matthew Martin (RJ's son) pens, but his selection is limited at the moment. I have a carbon fiber/titanium 375 that's fantastic, although I swapped the Tuff Writer mechanism with a Schmidt SKM-88, which extends a tiny bit more and doesn't grind against the inside of the pen when clicking like the Tuff Writer can.

The Combat Beads click pens are very similar to the DDR - basically just different aesthetics. Same Schmidt SKM-88 click mechanism. The aesthetics might be a bit less "professional" than you wish, with the knobby grip and more prominent pocket clip.

For bolt pens, it'd be hard to beat Tactile Turn or TiScribe. The Tactile Turns might be the nicest looking ones out there, but I feel that the mechanism should go the other way - in fact it's backwards compared to all the other (several) bolt pens I have (except a couple that go both ways). Tactile Turn also makes a click pen, although it has a different release mechanism (a button on the side).

Regardless of what pen you get, you'll want to look at ones that use Parker G2 style refills (not to be confused with Pilot G2 gel pen refills). The commonly found Schmidt Easy Flow 9000, Ohto needle point, Itoya Aquaroller, and Schneider Gelion are all Parker G2 style. Any pen that uses these should also work just fine with Fisher Space Pen refills with the included adapter. Few pens are made specifically to use only the Space Pen refill (without the adapter), and usually those will also be very compact, mini pens. Custom/semi-custom pens that use Parker G2 are quite common, and there's a huge number of compatible refills if your intern wants to try something different than the Space Pen.

I like the Space Pen refills for the pressurized ink that can write on nearly anything. I prefer the fine over the medium, as I find the medium can occasionally glob a bit (particularly if not used for a while), and I prefer a finer tip in general, although but for general use or extended writing the medium is definitely smoother. But for regular use the Space Pens are not my favorite. For smooth writing on regular paper I really like the Monteverde gel needle point, which writes a lot like a Pentel Energel. For glossy paper (like credit card receipts), I prefer a ballpoint, and the Ohto needle point and the Monteverde fine point write smoothly and precisely. I do not like Schmidt Easy Flow 9000. They gloop and glob like crazy and often don't write immediately (ya gotta scribble a bit to get the ink flowing). After reading so much how great they were, I was severely disappointed in them. If you want a hybrid ink, I suggest the Itoya Aquaroller or Uni Jetstream instead (the Jetstream is only available in black, but it might just be the best writing refill out there).

I'm less knowledgeable about other types of pens.
 

Railsplitter

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
6,609
Benchmade is scheduled to release a couple new models called the Shorthand and the Longhand. They are supposed to be released in about a month. Both are bolt action pens and the MSRP is $120-$160 depending on the model and the finish.

Shorthand
Shorthand.jpg
Longhand
Longhand.jpg
 

JLTX

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
55
Everybody's going get him a pen. Why don't you get him a kinfemaker knife? With 250 smackeroos, you could get him something really nice.
You are absolutely correct, but I am hamstrung by “corporate policy” of gifting certain items. Sad, but true…borrowing from Metallica
 

JLTX

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
55
If you can budge on the Fisher refills, the Fellhoelter TiBolt is stellar. The regular-size TiBolt takes Schmidt easyFLOW 900 refills, which I prefer to Fisher anyway. The tolerances on this pen are incredible (you won't know how to unscrew it just by looking at it, because that join is so perfect), the action is a ton of fun, and it holds up to regular use.

I bought mine six years ago, and have never bought a nice pen after that -- because I just want to use this one all the time, so that's what I do. It still looks, and writes, like new; you will be able to bury me with this pen.

L2qPR3i.jpg
Thank you for the great suggestion!
 

JLTX

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
55
Thank you, I appreciate the time that you took on my behalf to communicate your experiences👍🏻
But what kind of pen? Retractable or with a screw-on cap? If retractable, would you prefer a clicky, twist, or bolt action? Are you looking for something that's basically a really nice version of a regular pen that you'd find at anyone's desk or by the phone, or something more elegant that someone in a suit would use to sign contracts or that someone would do journaling with?

The Darrell Ralph (DDR) Go Pens (there's a couple pictured above) are good candidates for a high-quality clicky style pens. I have a couple, both titanium, one with a titanium tip one with a copper. The copper tip one I did have to ream out a bit to get a Fisher fine refill to fit through. I personally feel like the titanium ones have a very good balance and weight; if you have a Zebra F-701, it's pretty close to the same diameter and weight. You can get them in stainless steel too, if you want something heavier, or even full copper. The clip is very strong and won't over-bend easily (you can bend it back if you need to), and replacements are available. The click mechanism is a Schmidt SKM-88 (very commonly used for this type of semi-custom pen), which is smooth, relatively quiet, reliable, and very inexpensive to replace should the unlikely need ever arise.

I can also heartily recommend Matthew Martin (RJ's son) pens, but his selection is limited at the moment. I have a carbon fiber/titanium 375 that's fantastic, although I swapped the Tuff Writer mechanism with a Schmidt SKM-88, which extends a tiny bit more and doesn't grind against the inside of the pen when clicking like the Tuff Writer can.

The Combat Beads click pens are very similar to the DDR - basically just different aesthetics. Same Schmidt SKM-88 click mechanism. The aesthetics might be a bit less "professional" than you wish, with the knobby grip and more prominent pocket clip.

For bolt pens, it'd be hard to beat Tactile Turn or TiScribe. The Tactile Turns might be the nicest looking ones out there, but I feel that the mechanism should go the other way - in fact it's backwards compared to all the other (several) bolt pens I have (except a couple that go both ways). Tactile Turn also makes a click pen, although it has a different release mechanism (a button on the side).

Regardless of what pen you get, you'll want to look at ones that use Parker G2 style refills (not to be confused with Pilot G2 gel pen refills). The commonly found Schmidt Easy Flow 9000, Ohto needle point, Itoya Aquaroller, and Schneider Gelion are all Parker G2 style. Any pen that uses these should also work just fine with Fisher Space Pen refills with the included adapter. Few pens are made specifically to use only the Space Pen refill (without the adapter), and usually those will also be very compact, mini pens. Custom/semi-custom pens that use Parker G2 are quite common, and there's a huge number of compatible refills if your intern wants to try something different than the Space Pen.

I like the Space Pen refills for the pressurized ink that can write on nearly anything. I prefer the fine over the medium, as I find the medium can occasionally glob a bit (particularly if not used for a while), and I prefer a finer tip in general, although but for general use or extended writing the medium is definitely smoother. But for regular use the Space Pens are not my favorite. For smooth writing on regular paper I really like the Monteverde gel needle point, which writes a lot like a Pentel Energel. For glossy paper (like credit card receipts), I prefer a ballpoint, and the Ohto needle point and the Monteverde fine point write smoothly and precisely. I do not like Schmidt Easy Flow 9000. They gloop and glob like crazy and often don't write immediately (ya gotta scribble a bit to get the ink flowing). After reading so much how great they were, I was severely disappointed in them. If you want a hybrid ink, I suggest the Itoya Aquaroller or Uni Jetstream instead (the Jetstream is only available in black, but it might just be the best writing refill out there).

I'm less knowledgeable about other types of pens.
in re to your question, a unique and elegant office pen that can be used in front of bosses/clients.
 

JLTX

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
55
Thank you everyone! I ended buying several Fellhoelter (4) pens. Gorgeous and fun! I was not aware of them before your generous recs!
 
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