1095 Patina Discussion

Viper84

Patina Artist
Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2020
Messages
258
I broke in my TC Barlow today by cutting up an orange and it started a nice brown colored patina. I've seen pics on here where people have multi-colored patinas that are blue, purple, and black. So I was curious if you all know what types of foods or other things create certain colored patinas.

Also please post any 1095 patina pics you have here!

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willard0341

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2013
Messages
1,431
image.jpg Go hot... whether it is a roast, chicken etc
The more you darken it the more work it will be to clean it up when you are wanting it to be shiny again (if your anything like me)
Have a good one

This one has had mustard, siriachi, cold blue
I emptied my fathers urine bag his short time in hospice... so it got patined in that also. I think of dad every time I cut up a pork chop
 

Rookie82

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2014
Messages
1,550
I try really hard to like patina. Occassionally I see a pic of one that admire. But I keep coming back, I just want my blades shiny. So I wipe down my blade multiple times a day, I don't even want to see fingerprints on it. But we each have our own preferences!
 

solphilos

Basic Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
1,040
View attachment 1498119 Go hot... whether it is a roast, chicken etc
The more you darken it the more work it will be to clean it up when you are wanting it to be shiny again (if your anything like me)
Have a good one

This one has had mustard, siriachi, cold blue
I emptied my fathers urine bag his short time in hospice... so it got patined in that also. I think of dad every time I cut up a pork chop
Ha! If knives could talk...we would probably prefer that they didn’t :D
 

traumkommode

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Messages
3,839
In my experience, the color of the patina is related to how deep the oxidization goes and how old it is. Doesn't matter what I cut - meat, fruit, whatever. The fresh patina will be that rainbow smattering, and over time the more patina I add (the more layers of oxidization that accrue), the darker it gets until it turns that grey/"black". Might also be related to other minerals in the meat or fruit juice.

A metallurgist would have to comment on this, but most metals are crystalline solids, and so we could be talking about different angles of the surface being oxidized on a very small scale, which would impact the color of light we see reflected on the blade. I further suspect something like this, because the *seen* color of the patina will change by applying some oil to the oxidized blade, or vis versa cleaning it off.

Acid soaks and ferric chloride can produce dark grey/"black" patina quickly, but those tend to be much stronger in concentration and oxidize more quickly/deeply.

Also, polished blades seem to take on a more brilliant rainbow at first than satin blades do.

I believe I had cut something spicy with this knife to get those darker splats on the top layer (spicy = acidic)
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huntnfishin

Gold Member
Joined
May 16, 2009
Messages
519
I like an even gray patina. That’s just me. At least that is how I like carbon to start out. I usually wipe the blade with rubbing alcohol then get my tap water scalding hot and hold the blade under it for a minute or two. Then I rub a cut lime or lemon (I have lots from yard trees...) on the blade and voila. Here is my latest in 1084 (close to 1095 sorry) to share 1C23FCF5-4DF0-4FFF-81F0-F3A35EF28015.jpeg
 

Will Power

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
26,202
Citrus fruits do well but don't leave that juice on too long...I pitted a knife from cutting up Limes and then left it unwiped for a day or two, mistake.

Garlic works extremely well or others from the Onion family, to enhance patina, let the garlic dry on for a bit-it's pretty oily stuff- then put the knife under a really hot tap and dry it immediately. Grand colours-for a while.

Can't really make up my mind abut patina, it's rarely even unless the knife is sole use, I dislike spotty, blotchy effect. So I usually end up cleaning it off with a green pad or metal polish and begin again, can be rewarding. Thank God somebody discovered stainless ;) some people on this Forum have yet to...:D

Don't forget the fungi , they bring it on too.

n8friQv.jpg
 

Viper84

Patina Artist
Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2020
Messages
258
Citrus fruits do well but don't leave that juice on too long...I pitted a knife from cutting up Limes and then left it unwiped for a day or two, mistake.

Garlic works extremely well or others from the Onion family, to enhance patina, let the garlic dry on for a bit-it's pretty oily stuff- then put the knife under a really hot tap and dry it immediately. Grand colours-for a while.

Can't really make up my mind abut patina, it's rarely even unless the knife is sole use, I dislike spotty, blotchy effect. So I usually end up cleaning it off with a green pad or metal polish and begin again, can be rewarding. Thank God somebody discovered stainless ;) some people on this Forum have yet to...:D

Don't forget the fungi , they bring it on too.

n8friQv.jpg

So it would take the citrus juice hours to form pits?

The blotch near the tip in the image below was from a little drop of orange juice being on the knife for a few minutes.

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Joined
Jan 11, 2015
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You guys just using them and then closing them afterwards? Or wiping or washing them off first?
 

Old Hunter

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Joined
Jul 12, 2012
Messages
5,981
23 years of existence as a pocketknife. The bluish tint on the Clip blade formed after I cut the seal from the top of a jug of antifreeze about ten years ago - the truck and the antifreeze are long gone but the patina stayed. OH
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