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8760 vs cpm-154

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by 89TSI, Nov 21, 2020.

  1. 89TSI

    89TSI

    2
    Sep 25, 2018
    Beginner to knife world and bushcraft. I was looking for some Opinions on 8760 vs CPM-154. I purchased two blades by the same maker and can only keep one. Same style but one is made from 8760 and the other is cpm-154. I live in Virginia and it does get humid in the summers. I’m not a master at sharpening but willing to put in the time to keep it sharp. I don’t mind a little material upkeep.
    Would love some input on which steel to keep.
     
  2. knarfeng

    knarfeng senex morosus moderator Staff Member Super Mod Moderator

    Jul 30, 2006
    Those are vastly different alloys.
    CPM 154 is a stainless powder metal steel.

    AISI 8000 series is a medium/high carbon alloy steel. I couldn't find a data sheet for 8760, but according to the AISI naming system you have
    Ni 0.55%, Cr 0.50%, Mo 0.25% with .6% Carbon.

    Exact comparison is a little difficult to lock in without knowing the hardness, but in general:
    • CPM 154 is stainless, relatively brittle compared to an alloy steel, and holds an edge longer. It also wants to be sharpened using a synthetic stone, aluminum oxide, diamond or such.
    • 8760 is not stainless, should be very tough. It won't hold an edge nearly as long as CPM 154. It can be sharpened on natural or synthetic stones.
    I don't do bushcraft, so I'll let others opine on the real world benefits of both.
    Some of it is going to depend on how you specifically want to use it.
     
    oldmanwilly likes this.
  3. BogdanS

    BogdanS KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    139
    Jan 11, 2015
    @89TSI - depending on your intended use for the steel as Mr. @knarfeng said; the 8670 makes a better bushcraft workhorse (if the HT and geometry is done right) while the CPM-154 is the slicer guy ;)

    All the best, God bless,
    Bogdan
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2020
  4. Larrin

    Larrin Gold Member Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Gold Member

    Jan 17, 2004
    Do you mean 8670? It’s commonly available from knife steel suppliers right now. I haven’t seen 8760.
     
    jbmonkey likes this.
  5. BogdanS

    BogdanS KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    139
    Jan 11, 2015
    Correct 8670 - typo ;)

    All the best, God bless,
    Bogdan
     
  6. BogdanS

    BogdanS KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    139
    Jan 11, 2015
    Now i just made a short search in my book and i only found a short phrase about the 8760 - '
    8760 Use - Tools, springs, chisels'; judging by this it seems that i can keep my initial post that it would make a nice workhorse bush blade ;)

    All the best, God bless,
    Bogdan
     
  7. 89TSI

    89TSI

    2
    Sep 25, 2018
    Appreciate all the information. Thankyou.
     
  8. M.FREEZE

    M.FREEZE

    Dec 13, 2012
    I think 8670 is equivalent to L6. It’s used for circular saw blades. It’s very tough, but will develop surface rust if you look at it wrong.
     
  9. sabre cat

    sabre cat Basic Member Basic Member

    Jul 4, 2014
    I have a bushcraft knife in S30v.
    It’s a little nicer than CPM154 but the steel is from the same company.

    I also carry a folder in 154cm (basically the same as CPM154).

    You should not have a problem with any of the above.
     

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