885UH Walden Liners

Codger_64

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I recently acquired an 885UH Schrade-Walden for my collection, and during "playtime", I compared it to my Schrade 885UH. Of course the tangstamps are diferent, but so are the liners. On the Schrade, they are plain brass. But on the Walden, they appear to be stainless, and somewhat fancy. Is this normal for this vintage, or is this something special?


Codger
 
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Nice one Michael!
Those liners are usually referred to as milled liners. I've heard folks say "milled for strength," but I don't see them as anything more than a nice decorative touch, more like a precursor to file working. JMO, of course.

Here is an older STA-SHARP, which I believe was Sears' first pocketknife brand from the late 20s, 'til just before WW2, IIRC.

Bill
 
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Those liners are nickel silver, not stainless steel. I don't believe that any traditional factory made slipjoint has been made with stainless steel liners before the late 90's.

Nickel silver was the tradtional lining material on higher end knives, but especially real stockman and trapper patterns since the nickel silver does not oxidize like brass does and is easier to keep clean and sanitary.

In the old days companies like Remington used iron to line the least expensive knives, then came brass, then nickel silver at the top of the line for certain patterns. Heavy duty foling hunter type knives even at the high end still had brass liners though.
 

Codger_64

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Thanks Bill. That's a new term for my vocabulary. I could tell by looking at the Walden that the design was done mechanically before assembly. It was just too uniform and small to be handwork. I still wonder if the stainless liners were common on these Walden Uncle Henry's (milled or not milled).

That is a very nice knife you've shown as well. The pattern on the center liner more resembles what I have come to recognize as "filework" (mechanically done or by hand).

Codger
 

Codger_64

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And thankyou Knifeaholic! Today seems to be my day for learning! Now that you mention it, the metal does very nicely match the N.S. bolster ends. In most areas, they appear to be one with the bolsters, whether by fine finish or wear, I can't say. This knife is more pocket-worn than used.

Codger
 
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This type of milling is defined as a style ( or type ) of what in cutlery terms is called jimping. LT
 
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It is also called "gimping", don't know which is really correct but both terms seemed to be used interchangeably.
 
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Thanks for bringing up this topic Codger. I have a couple of SWs with the same jimping or gimping on the liners. One thing I wanted to add is that the fit and finish on these older knives is outstanding. Who ever put the final edge on these blades surely must have taken a lot of pride in thier work. All three of these are just about scary sharp from tang to tip and the angle of the grind is near perfect on both sides.
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