A 'my first khukri' question...

Joined
Aug 23, 2008
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7
Greetings everyone, i'm a new member and a first time poster.

I've also never owned or used a khukri.

That said i've been doing a lot of research, read tonnes of posts, and i'm convinced that the khukri is the right tool for my jobs. Whenever a person asks for a recommendation, i notice experienced users of all sorts of bladed tools come back with "what exaclty will you be using it for!?" So...

What i'm using it for: Digging up roots, prying, chopping small lumber and limbing trees. Any kind of bushcraft you can think of. However when i have my khukris around i will also have a fixed blade knife (3-6" blade) and a full sized axe, so my khuk doesn't have to fill those roles. Very occasionally I might need it as a machete to clear bush. And a very small possiblity of one day needing to defend myself against an animal with it (four legged variety not two).

So now that i've perhaps made myself sound like a bit of a wacko. Don't worry, I do intend to become very skilled with my khukri before using it in situ, as just described.

My questions: 1) Recommended model and length and blade thickness? 1/2" sounds awfully thick. 2) recommended handle material? I like horn but whatever is most durable wins the day! 3) recommended Kami for this setup?

Thanks in advance and if you have the time and inclination, check out my other recommendation request in the fixed blade section.

Regards,
Daniel
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2006
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7,035
There's a lot that can do what you want. Since you want to clear some light bush as well, I'd recommend a lighter weight than your typical Ang Khola.

Something like a Chitlangi or Dui Chirra in a 16.5-18" length should do well. They're usually 3/8" thick. This will compromise the heavy chopping, but since you're going to have an axe for that, it shouldn't be a problem. These also tend to be more "pointy" so if you have to stab the sabretooth tiger stalking you, that may help. :D

If you want to err more on the side of a heavy chopper, a WWII or BAS in the same length as above would be a good choice.
 

Steely_Gunz

Got the Khukuri fevah
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First of all, welcome:D

Depending on your size and how light/heavy you want to travel, you might think about the 16.5" or 18" WWII model. Both of my experiences with these blades were very positive:)

I find that the WWII will chop well, split wood well, balances nicely, offers several different grips due to its longish handle, and can be whipped around to take out stuff that is 1/4"-1" in diameter pretty easily.

If you want something that is both tough, yet slightly thinner at the spine (generally), and will make a very formidable weapon, check out the 17-18" M-43.

Also, as Cpt said, a nice thinnish (but not too thin) khuk like a chit or siru might serve you very well.

If you want a very jack-of-all-trades in a packable length, check out the 15" BAS. Very easy to throw on a belt or lash to a pack. chops well, pries well, and will do most camp chores with relative ease.
Good luck:)
 
Joined
May 18, 1999
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15,395
What i'm using it for: Digging up roots, prying, chopping small lumber and limbing trees. Any kind of bushcraft you can think of. However when i have my khukris around i will also have a fixed blade knife (3-6" blade) and a full sized axe, so my khuk doesn't have to fill those roles. Very occasionally I might need it as a machete to clear bush. And a very small possiblity of one day needing to defend myself against an animal with it (four legged variety not two).

Regards,
Daniel

Welcome Daniel.:thumbup: :D

I'm going to stay with the 16"-18" BGRS I recommend as usual seeing as how I feel it best fits all of the uses you've described. :cool:
And as usual it's a compromise in that it will excel at some of the uses and will satisfactorily do the others but there is no *one kukri* that will excel at all the uses you've described, which is why so many of us have so many different kukris. :p ;) :D

Edit:
Horn is probably the most durable but has the potential for developing cracks and most definitely requires the most care and because of that I prefer wood and especially the harder woods. Besides that I have a better grip with the wood handles, the horn is too slippery for my taste in the polished state they come in but aren't so bad with a steel wool or Scotch-Brite satin finish. :)


....
 
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Joined
Dec 6, 2004
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After doing the research it sounds like you've also done, I finally read a couple of threads commenting that Uncle Bill was partial to the WWII as an all-round khuk. Good enough recommendation for me ... I got a 16 1/2" on a deal-of-the-day, and three years or so later it's still my go-to khuk for pretty much everything you've described.

I have a bigger/heavier AK for dedicated chopping, but it gets precious little use in comparison. The lighter WWII hits above it's weight class, is faster, and is less tiring. Also more convenient to pack around.
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2002
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I'd say the smaller WWII is the sweet spot for everything you want to do. That or a thinner ( and lighter) 18" AK.

Problem is balancing the chopping and machete roles - heavier tends to be better for chopping, while lighter gives you better swing speed and usually a thinner edge to go through flexible brush. The answer might be to go with a longer blade - a 20" sirupati or 18" Gelbu Special gives you a quick blade, but the length gives you some leverage for limbing/chopping applications.

BGRS would be good if you can find one on the lighter end. Mine comes in at 1/2" and is a beast. It wouldn't be bad if you were cutting thicker brush, or grabbing it with one hand.

I'll throw out the M43 as a left-field suggestion. Beautiful blade with a very nice swing. It would definitely handle limbing and brush. Not so ideal for digging, but it would do.
 
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Mar 30, 2007
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Keep in mind that in cross section, a 1/2" thick khukuri blade will not be 1/2" thick all the way across.

Many of them have deep concave fullers on the blades and they taper sharply towards the edge, looking something like an acute hollow-ground wedge in cross section.
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2008
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Thanks for all the advice everyone. This is always a problem i find when ordering stuff online. I'm pretty sure if i could just hold the khukris I would know very quickly by the feel.

I'm pretty set on something no bigger than 18". But is 18 too big? Especially to carry around everywhere for days on end?

I thought maybe the Chiruwa Ang Khola. Coming in at 16-17" and a little thinner and lighter than normal AK's. Does anyone have any experience with these?

I'm also considering the 16.5" WWII as per so many recommendations for it now.
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2006
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I'm pretty set on something no bigger than 18". But is 18 too big? Especially to carry around everywhere for days on end?

I thought maybe the Chiruwa Ang Khola. Coming in at 16-17" and a little thinner and lighter than normal AK's. Does anyone have any experience with these?

I'm also considering the 16.5" WWII as per so many recommendations for it now.

Well, my go to kukri is a 20" CAK. I keep it very sharp and it chops wood very well and with proper technique, does a number on light vegetation as well. On a belt, it would be a pain to carry. Baldric-style, I hardly notice the weight (3 pounds roughly).

I do have an 18" WWII, and it probably is the best all-rounder I have.
I do know that if you have big hands, you'll want a longer (18+ inch) kukri, as they make the handle length proportionate to the length of the kukri.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2007
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I also recommend the BAS out of personal experience, but the WWII is undoubtedly reputed as a good all-arounder as well. If I only could have one (perish the thought!), it'd probably be my BAS.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2007
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My $0.02, the 15"AK is the #1 seller for a reason. I have several other khuks but this is the one that goes on most hikes & general knocking around.
Uplander
 
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Jun 13, 2006
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Problem is balancing the chopping and machete roles - heavier tends to be better for chopping, while lighter gives you better swing speed and usually a thinner edge to go through flexible brush. The answer might be to go with a longer blade - a 20" sirupati or 18" Gelbu Special gives you a quick blade, but the length gives you some leverage for limbing/chopping applications.

Sage advice, I think. Longer, slightly thinner khuks could still do light and medium chopping (with patience), yet be more efficient at the machete duties than a shorter, but more massive khuk.
 
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