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A Question for The Leather Workers

Discussion in 'Sheaths & Such' started by afishhunter, May 24, 2018.

  1. afishhunter

    afishhunter

    Oct 21, 2014
    Is the proper title of those who work with leather "Leatherwright" or "Leather Smith"?

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Either way. Wright of course means maker of but it's not really in common usage anymore. How many know I'm a maker of horses? Pretty well known horse trainer years ago. I think more folks would use and say smith over wright. Just more common today and maybe in US English. I don't use either. Folks ask me what I do I say I'm a leather craftsman.
     
    afishhunter and hughd like this.
  3. afishhunter

    afishhunter

    Oct 21, 2014
    Thank you, Dave. :)
    I knew you make beef, but did not know you make horses, too. :)
     
    Horsewright likes this.
  4. sheathmaker

    sheathmaker Custom Leather Sheaths Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    May 18, 2005
    Dave's answer is good enough for me. Leather Craftsman is the ticket.

    Paul
     
    Horsewright likes this.
  5. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Oh heck yeah. I was the last stop before Alpo for a lot of horses. I didn't get the cupcakes. Wrote the book on it so to speak.

    [​IMG]

    Little ol paperback that sold for $18 back in the day at my clinics. I've seen it used for $200 now on Amazon. @afishhunter
     
  6. Ebbtide

    Ebbtide

    Aug 20, 1999
    I'd go with leather worker...
    Old school, my dad considered himself a wood worker... not just a carpenter or cabinet maker... he worked with wood.
    But as long as they don't call us late to dinner....
     
    Horsewright and afishhunter like this.
  7. Didgeridude

    Didgeridude Basic Member Basic Member

    26
    Aug 3, 2011
    I know this is a little late but this is some good info for someone wanting to market working with leather, and a fun fact. I would stay away from "leather smith" (unless you tool a lot) as the "smith" modifier is derived from the old Germanic schmied or smite meaning "to hit." So if you don't spend much time hitting your leather, it might not do as a title ;). But that is just my 2 cents.
     

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