another noob question

Joined
Aug 14, 2004
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104
I'm currently in the market for a cheap hardware store grinder. I just have a few questions... First off, a grinder can be used for stock removal right? Or should I still use a hacksaw to take off most of the material? Secondly, how much should I be spending for my very first belt grinder? and lastly, what is the difference between grinds (e.g. Hollow grind, scandi grind, etc. etc.)? Thanks in advance.



-Chris
 
Joined
Nov 27, 1999
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3,745
This is a loaded question.....

First, yes you use the grinder for stock removal.

The second is tougher. I know makers that turn out stunning work with Harbor Freight grinders. It is more work and takes longer to develop skill with them. The best answer I can give you is to spend as much as you can afford. If you like knife making, you will grow into it quickly and your knives will pay for it.

If you don't like the trade, you will be able to sell a real user almost immediately whereas you will be hard pressed to give away a Harbor Freight. You'll get better answers I hope.......It's 2:30 AM and I haven't had my coffee yet. :eek:
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2000
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Well, I've had a cup of coffee so I'll take a shot at it. ;)

First, yes you can profile blades on a bench grinder, and even grind your bevels if you're so inclined. What's recommended though is a 2X72 belt grinder.

Second, useful machines in this size range from homebuilt for a couple hundred bucks to $400 - $3000 for commercial machines. The best recommendation one could make to someone serious about knifemaking would be a KMG from Beaumont Metal Works. Check it out.

Finally, Hollow Ground means the part of the blade tapering to the edge is concave. Flat Ground means just what it sounds like, the bevels are flat to the edge. A Scandi grind is flat ground also but for only about 1/3 or 2/5 of the width of the blade, and the blade has a distinct shape. Roger Linger has kind of specialized in these blades for a while.

You didn't ask but I'm going to make my standard tool pitch here. For knifemaking you will be best served (this is my opinion) by purchasing the following tools as soon as you can: belt grinder ($400), drill press ($60), metal cutting band saw ($160). And of course the assortment of belts, wet or dry paper, files, bits, steel, handle material, etc that you'll think never ends.

Others will jump in too, this is just my take on it. I made my first few knives on a bench grinder, tried a less expensive belt grinder next and didn't start getting results until I broke down and got a good belt grinder.
 
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Jul 2, 2000
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IronKnuckles said:
... and lastly, what is the difference between grinds (e.g. Hollow grind, scandi grind, etc. etc.)? Thanks in advance.-Chris

Good info on grinds here
and here.
Regards,
Greg
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2003
Messages
314
Iwill reiterate what Peter told you, buy the most machine you can afford. I for one have spent more time and money chasing bargains and trying to save a buck than was worth it. Had I just bought a kmg int he first place, I would have saved time, money and frustration. At the bare minimum I would say check out the grizzly at around 400$ it is at least a machine you can resell if you decide that this isn't for you.
Rick
 
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Mar 29, 2002
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As for the 'how much to spend' question, I have always tended to plague myself by starting out cheap and I suggest you decide that question based upon your conviction. For me, I have spent much more starting up than I should have because I decided to stick with knife making. In doing it over I would not have bought many things I did in the beginning. For a grinder that someone that knows he is really serious I would suggest a KMG if possible and the price of a Coote at the minimum.

I started with a $40 to $50 1 X 30 inch Harbor Freight and some other things that were money less well spent. Go the best you can swing for in the beginning. That's my limited but considered advise.

RL
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2000
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5,179
That's a good idea krept, I saw Harvey Dean doing just as you said in his flat grinding video. I'm gonna have to give that a shot.
 
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