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Axes, crosscuts, griphoist, and mules

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by muleman77, May 8, 2018.

  1. muleman77

    muleman77

    178
    Jan 24, 2015
    This was kind of an unlucky tree that fell. Two of them, and they just layed right down through trail long ways. Even followed a bend in the trail, the way they layed.

    Anyway, I rode in with one person, and a couple others hiked. 1 load to carry the tools. We moved it in a couple hours with some prepwork, one cut, a size 32 grip and a bit of riggin'

    This is a couple years old. Only got so many pics but I think they tell the basic outline anyway.

    Three good helpers
    [​IMG]

    True temper zenith double, plumb kentucky, Council pulaski
    [​IMG]
    7' Simonds
    [​IMG]


    Here we are getting it ready. I've rigged it with a wrap, cut a tree out that was going to block us, and the others are swamping out the last bit. It's a big log. I'm standing on the trail, which grades around right under the mess.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Change of direction
    [​IMG]
    Full wrap, to get it rolling
    [​IMG]
    The box
    [​IMG]
    Our cut, after we rolled it. About 30" or 32"
    [​IMG]

    Took care of most of it right there with the first pull. But we rigged up on the other side and put that broken off chunk by in the backgound, between the two guys, below the trail.
    [​IMG]

    Like that. Then some spit and polish
    [​IMG]

    This is right where I was standing in the first pic of it at the top of the post
    [​IMG]

    Packed it all back on the mules and head home.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
  2. muleman77

    muleman77

    178
    Jan 24, 2015
    .
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
    Miller '72 likes this.
  3. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Pretty cool.
     
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  4. BitingSarcasm

    BitingSarcasm

    750
    Feb 25, 2014
    I have been on trails where big logs had to be cut out of the way, sometimes leaving significant chunks on both sides. I usually think something like, "Wow, that looks like a lot of work. I would hate to carry the tools, come this far, put in hours of labor, and then drag my sorry self back out of the woods." The effort that goes into keeping trails walkable is appreciated, Muleman.
     
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  5. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Mules, crews, tools, saws, and planning - That is awesome - thank you for the pictures as well!
     
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  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Nice work! A griphoist is an amazing tool.
     
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  7. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    647
    Dec 20, 2015
    Beautiful day,and tools,and animals...(especially the animals!)

    Thanks,muleman,that is seriously neat to see something like that.

    Hate to be so ignorant,but must ask what exactly you use this "griphoist" gizmo for...Is it like a rope come-along but for use with wire?(is that handle longer,the view foreshortened in the photo?)....(seems like i spend All kinds of time doing chores of this very sort,but among the manual gear not familiar with anything above come-along or chain-hoist...But most often it comes to a chainsaw-winch...).
     
    muleman77 likes this.
  8. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Yes, a griphoist comes with a longer handle. It also comes with a shear pin that will fail if you attempt to use too long of handle. A griphoist is similar to a come along but pulls cable through it instead of spooling it up. This allows for an infinitely long cable to be used.

    A similar less expensive tool is a Maasdam rope puller. Same principle just not as powerful and uses rope instead of cable. The Maasdam unit is 3/4 ton but if you add a snatch block it'll pull 1.5 ton.

    http://wesspur.com/pullers/rope-cable-pullers.html

    Maasdam puller in action.
    https://www.bladeforums.com/threads...-the-axe-mattock.1491070/page-2#post-17177358
     
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  9. muleman77

    muleman77

    178
    Jan 24, 2015
    Yep, the handle isn't on it just yet in that picture.

    Pulls on the forward and reverse stroke as well.

    And has controlled descent the same way.

    That's a big one. It's rated at 8000 lbs double line, and with the basic riggin' is close to a 200 lb load to pack.
     
  10. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    I'll second that! Here I've only ever heard these referred to as Tirfor. A buddy and I used one to remove a large Yellow Birch tree that had broken off in a wind storm that was hung up almost vertical on other trees, but perilously hung over a house. The property owner wasn't interested in losing the hangup trees and we (me specifically, the feller/faller) weren't interested (at all) in trying to saw these out of the way. We notched bottom sections of the broken tree, same as preparing for a fall, but levered the pieces loose and winched them out via the borrowed commercial-rated Tirfor. After 3-4 sections had been removed the tree dropped down enough to untangle itself and fall short of the house. The beauty of the winch was we didn't have to be anywhere near the GD scary tree when doing the pulling. This all happened 40 years ago and I doubt either of us'd have the gumption to try something like that again because it was nerve wracking but the Tirfor did prove to be a miracle tool.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2018
  11. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    339
    Jul 31, 2017
    gosh diggity darn it.... one year ago I just wanted some info about good quality boys axe..... Now. I want a mule (donkey will do) and Tirfor. :)
    @muleman77Was the location of anchor tree perpendicular to fallen tree or little to the side: 45 degrees? Did the cable get loose once the tree started rolling down the hill ? I wish you had gopro on.
     
  12. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    647
    Dec 20, 2015
    Ah!Thanks all you guys,yes,i use Maasdam rope job constantly,so can imagine what a handy deal That is...

    Thanks again,most beautiful country,great equipment,gorgeous mules!:)
     
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  13. muleman77

    muleman77

    178
    Jan 24, 2015
    You're right in a way @300Six. Tirfor is the brand name, those we have are that as well. I think it's like crescent wrench-adjustable end wrench.

    @crbnSteeladdict I anchored above the logs, and a bit to the side of where I wrapped the choker roll. So uphill and forward of where the cut was made about halfway to the choker. With the change of direction anchored below obviously.
    Not able to get an actual 2:1 that way, but it adds some leverage.
     
  14. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    I am most impressed by this thread and the conversation it has created... I am thoroughly enjoying your work days Mulemann77.
     
    muleman77 likes this.
  15. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    I wish I had mules. I see the the FS offers classes in using pack animals out in Montana. That would be fun.

    How long have you been working with mules, Muleman?
     
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  16. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    339
    Jul 31, 2017
    Thanks for the info; Impressive work. Even though it wasn't General Sherman size tree my eye kept searching for Snow White and other 3 dwarfs hiding in the bushes :)
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
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  17. muleman77

    muleman77

    178
    Jan 24, 2015
    @Square_peg, It's been 25 years since I worked my first hunting season as a wrangler/ packer helper, in high school. And I've done it every year since, at least some. I've been a FS packer 10 years.
     
  18. muleman77

    muleman77

    178
    Jan 24, 2015
    Besides the Nine-mile class, Id recommend the local BCHA as a great way to get in and around some knowledgeable folks with regards to stock. They are really interested in helping, and they'd love to have a good trail worker on any of the projects, they do a fair amount of that kind of work.
     
  19. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Yeah, I've got friends in the local chapters of the Back Country Horsemen of Washington. They're very active in our state. I need to go sign up for a work party. It would be a pleasure just not having to carry my tools. All that iron adds a lot to your pack on multi-day trips.
     
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  20. muleman77

    muleman77

    178
    Jan 24, 2015
    It sure does.

    We have a pretty big crew that's is kind of stationary. I move the camp in, and out and they get groceries every week. About 10 pack loads a week. The local chapter here helps all through. They're a great asset. Especially since I go on quite a few fires, and if I'm gone they can take care of the crew ably.

    Then there's a couple pairs of wilderness patrol wandering around, and I go in and do stuff like this all the time they find that's over their equipment or ability. They brought this log above to my attention. Theyre doing a few things other than trailwork, and usually arent really experienced with it.

    Im the most familiar with the riggin' stuff and a C sawyer, plus pack the mules, so the pack animals and I are kind of the wilderness heavy equipment.
     

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