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Battery Powered Lawnmower

Discussion in 'Gadgets & Gear' started by Shann, May 9, 2019.

  1. Shann

    Shann

    Sep 2, 2004
    Does anyone have a battery powered lawnmower? I own a couple apartment houses and also mow my Mom's lawn. I was wondering if a battery lawnmower would work. I'm just kind of tired of lugging around a heavy push mower and a ramp to put in my truck. Not a big deal, but I was pretty happy with the performance of my 40V Ryobi chainsaw for little jobs. I also use 18V Ryobi tools for a lot of little projects.

    Largest of the three lawns takes about 45 minutes with my gas push mower. The smaller ones about a half hour.
     
  2. Scott321

    Scott321

    793
    Jul 20, 2016
    I just recently purchased a Ryobi 40V 5aH lawn mower at HD for two 1/4 acre properties which we rent out (no tenants right now so I'm mowing it). I was able to cut 6" grass without an issue (frequent lawn bag emptying at that length). The freshly charged battery was about 1/2-1/3 full after cutting one property. It was 10 times easier than using a reel mower (non-powered; traditional).

    IMO, get a spare battery (which usually costs 1/2 the price of the mower) and MAKE SURE IT HAS THE PROPER aH rating. Most of the spare batteries at the hardware store were for the smaller equipment. For example, if the mower takes 40V w/ 5aH, don't pick up a 40v 3.5aH battery as a spare.

    *I'll add that I stayed away from the Kobalt brand because their high aH spare batteries had terrible reviews.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  3. Shann

    Shann

    Sep 2, 2004
    Thanks. I would get a spare battery. I could also use it in my chainsaw although it gets rare use. It would also be compatible with the weedwhacker.

    Although Ryobi is not considered a contractor quality, for all the little random stuff I've done they have been great (at least since they started with the 18V and bigger lithium batteries--the old "blue" batteries were pretty lame).
     
  4. Scott321

    Scott321

    793
    Jul 20, 2016
    All the professionals I know or have contracted with use gas for everything landscape or snow related. If you are planning on using this day in and day out for years, gas is the way to go. If it's small enough, you can even use a string trimmer for small areas. I just bought this electric mower for the few weeks out of the year that I don't have tenants.
     
  5. heresthedeal

    heresthedeal

    812
    Oct 3, 2010
    Wife bought one, used it once a week last year, April to Oct had no issues, used half to 2/3 gallon gas before in a 3 horse mower to do it and got 2 mows per charge on the battery.
    Takes a bit over an hour to charge.
    The one from home depot, not sure of brand name, snow blower uses same battery.
     
  6. Danke42

    Danke42

    Feb 10, 2015
    I figure a "good" one is going to scale about the same as a gas machine.

    Batteries are jumping by leaps and bounds but for this job you'll probably want a spare one. If you run low when you mow at home you can stop, charge (overnight) and carry on the next day. If you're on the road that's a hassle.

    It would say wait till fall and buy one on clearout or a floor model. I always get my larger stuff off season.
     
  7. gadgetgeek

    gadgetgeek

    May 19, 2007
    Where I work we have a stihl set, mower, blower, mini-chainsaw, hedge trimmer. Really effective, and overall I think the benefits now outweigh the downsides. Yes the batteries are expensive, but looking at the entire system, I think they are filling a wider and wider niche.
     
  8. Shann

    Shann

    Sep 2, 2004
    I discovered yesterday that I had an 18V Ryobi lithium battery randomly go bad over the winter. It was not left out in the garage during the cold weather. Only a couple years old. The other battery that I got at the same time still worked fine.
     
  9. gadgetgeek

    gadgetgeek

    May 19, 2007
    You might be able to get it rebuilt, or rebuild it yourself. Lithiums go bad every once and a while, and if the cells just need replacing, you do get what you pay for, and possibly still cheaper than getting a new battery.
     
  10. domiro

    domiro

    48
    Sep 10, 2018
    We have a Black and Decker. It works fine but not so great for cutting heavy grass.
     
  11. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    That is my take as well on battery operated lawn and garden equipment. I would seriously consider a 40V+ lawn mower if I have to replace my current gas push mower. Been really pleased with the 40V weedeater and have used it for a couple years now in my medium sized yard. I purposely design things so that I can use the mower for most of tighter spaces. If I decide to get a zero turn mower (would love to have one but $$), it will change everything. It is just not necessary and would be a want rather than a need. Storage is an issue too for them.

    My take on battery power lawn mowers so far has been if you could use an old style reel type push mower, then go battery. When the battery size increases or becomes cheaper, I will change my view.
     
  12. gadgetgeek

    gadgetgeek

    May 19, 2007
    The groundsman who uses the electric mower uses it exactly where a reel mower might also be used, the small areas around the offices, places where noise and exhaust would be more disruptive, and where a light mower is easier to maneuver. It replaced a standard gas push mower, and I don't think we even use that one much anymore. Everything else can be done with the large yard tractor. The blower is also very good. By far the best battery/electric blower I've ever used, even standard plug in ones don't hold candle to this thing.
     
  13. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I'm going to keep my eye on developments with the battery operated yard accessories including the small tillers/cultivators.
     
  14. gadgetgeek

    gadgetgeek

    May 19, 2007
    It won't be long, the torque is already available, its just getting the draw out of the batteries. As we see super-capacitors getting better, this will filter down to yard tools soon enough. As my old man says, sure you can have a machine that runs all day, but most people really only want a machine that runs as long as they do.
     
  15. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I have a Toro electric (corded) blower that is really powerful. I got it a couple years ago for some special purpose work. The cord is a bit of a pain as we all know, but I mostly use it on my deck to blow leaves and debris off periodically these days. I have however used it for leaves in the yard a time or two, but I'm generally a person who mulches the leaves that accumulate in the yard with a mower. The trick is to just not allow the leaves to get too thick where the small push mower starts to snow plow them.

    I think for non-commercial work, battery powered mowers are the future for typical yard sizes. And I agree with your father, most just want a yard implement that lasts as long as we do or as long as it takes to get the job done, and does not require a great deal of care or maintenance. There is still a place for the big mowers and so forth.
     

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