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Belknap chromed presentation axe....

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by gben, Jul 20, 2017.

  1. gben

    gben

    374
    Nov 26, 2014
    From a local second-hand shop. My guess is it was presented to a fireman upon retirement or as some sort of award? My uneducated guess is that this is from the late 60s/early 70s.

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
    mmmotorcycle, Tutone, Stelth and 2 others like this.
  2. halfaxe

    halfaxe

    Nov 29, 2012
    Or for parades?
     
  3. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    I like that minimalist wedge! Means the haft was a 'honeymoon fit' and that the wedge is solely there as a lock. Whoever did this knew what he was doing.
     
  4. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    garry3 likes this.
  5. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    That head has more "graceful" lines than the fire axes shown in Belknap's catalogs:

    [​IMG]
    from 1937 catalog pages (Rose Antique Tools is back online!)

    The fire axe in Belknap's 1970 (ca.) catalog also has a head like the one in the 1937 catalog (page 8, with Blue Grass brand and a red handle).

    Some evidence that the "Pride of Kentucky" handle is just a replacement handle:
    A"Hardware Age" journal from 1966 says that "Pride of Kentucky" is a tool handle brand from Belknap.
    (Snippet view from search)
     
    garry3 and Agent_H like this.
  6. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    This thing had to have been 'gussied up' (via grinders, sanders and buffing wheels) before it was plated. Folks that are used to plating trophies, handguns, ceremonial shovels and classic car parts know that smooth bare metal is essential, and artistic license probably entered the equation when a 'hardware store - pedestrian' fire axe arrived for their magic touch. The OEM handle would have had to be removed in order to do this and wouldn't have survived (ie been re-used) either.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2017
  7. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    [​IMG]


    Bob
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2017
  8. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    In both catalog pictures, both the pick ends and the bit ends look shorter (relative to the height at the eye).
     
  9. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    well, thats it, my fire axe is a markingless belknap bluegrass, thanks for unknowingly helping.
     
  10. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 11, 2016
    The factory that made the bluegrass axes could've polished up the head and sent just it out to be hung, or possibly had the ability to chrome plate in house.

    BTW, anyone else notice that the screw is Philips.
    Could help narrow down an age as it doesn't appear to have never been touched with a screwdriver like one someone replaced would probably look.
     
  11. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Henry Ford was so ticked off at not being able to buy the rights to Canadian Peter L. Robertson's revolutionary square drive screws (patented 1908) that he bought hook, line and sinker into the lesser-capable Phillips system when it became available in 1935 ( I thought it was 1918 but who's gonna argue with Wikipedia). So no, this only tells you the axe is less than 100 years old.
     
  12. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    Yes. Seems to be one on eadh side.


    Bob
     
  13. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Would you put screws in a parade axe or in a user?
     
  14. gben

    gben

    374
    Nov 26, 2014
    Thanks Steve. But I would never take illustrations and believe they were always going to be representative of a companies product all the time. Illustrators can take liberties, and then a company may use old illustrations for years to save money and they do not wear out like forging dies so an illustration could be used through many tooling sets.

    I could believe that a company would source axe heads from one source and handles from another though as was economical and convenient to do so. The only thing I would trust would be if I found a number of marked axe heads and could compare their dimensions to each other and to this axe, then I might be able to make a real guess as to who made this head. All I had to go on was the handle label. Next time when posting about a similar axe I will be careful to leave the brand-name from the beginning of the title though....

    If anyone has a marked Belknap fire-axe head or any marked head that looks similar to this one throw up the photo so we can all compare it.

    Thank-you everyone for your input...
     
    rjdankert and Square_peg like this.
  15. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Didn't more than one manufacturer make axes for Belknap?
     
  16. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    I think it's beenn confirmed that someone besides Kelly made axes for Belknap. I just can't recall who. I think it was a big name like Collins or Plumb.
     
    Moonw likes this.

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