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Best made Axes

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by John A. Larsen, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Needless to say gears, shafts and bearings are never frictionless. Internal combustion engines on the other hand generate twice as much energy in the form of heat as they do energy that can perform work.
     
  2. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Yes yes, but the question remains--are electric drag racers billhooks? :D
     
    Park Swan and rjdankert like this.
  3. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Hey, did you actually think they contacted the industrial garment industry or bona fide outdoor workers for advice after conducting hipster-type fashion surveys? Cruiser actually meant something (aside from 'police vehicle') only a few decades ago, today it is applicable to an urban slicker searching out compliments, or a piece of tail.
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  4. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    48
    Jul 31, 2017
    I am pretty sure BMC exactly knows on which cruiser they based the name:The Filson Cruiser was first released in 1914 and would go on to become one of the brand’s iconic designs. The Cruiser name and the unique design were officially patented on March 3, 1914 (US Patent #1088891). A favorite of lumbermen, the Cruiser was named after timber cruisers who surveyed the logging land. http://www.filsonitaly.it/filson/blogging-on-filson-cruiser-chads-dry-goods/
    https://www.filson.com/history
     
  5. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    I had presumed their jacket was named after the specific double bit 'cruiser' axe, and not after clothing that a Timber Cruiser might have worn. Seeing as B.M. has to source their stuff from actual manufacturers I wonder if their coats are made by Filson, which is still in business and for $635 will sell you a Mackinaw Cruiser jacket that looks for all the world like the affordable Hudson's Bay lumberman's and hunter's wool jackets that were ubiquitous in Canada for well over a century.
     
    crbnSteeladdict likes this.
  6. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    253
    Jul 25, 2017
    I know I have my work cut out for me on these...I was lucky to find these treasures.
    Pretty damn fortunate to find the rare yellow painted handle, with a makers stamp still clear.
    The other, raw handled, I see may need a little attention and a rehang, but I feel very fortunate to have found these today.

    https://imgur.com/gallery/VpUBD

    Thanks for looking guys:)
     
  7. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    48
    Jul 31, 2017
    The way I see it: BMC cuts corners left and right (wool is expensive so Corduroy liner and they still have balls to call it WOOL Cruiser) They price it $50 less than Filson's Double Cruiser(https://www.filson.com/double-mackinaw-cruiser-11010041.html) and market it as comparable product. No, it is not made by Filson
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017 at 12:27 PM
  8. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    48
    Jul 31, 2017
    For those beauties you cannot go with regular BLO, you need High Grade Hand Cold Pressed Raw Organic Extra Virgin Linseed Oil :)
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  9. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Nice! Neither you nor the Estate has had very many clogged drains over the years, or, perhaps the yellow 'camouflage' served well to ensure that the implement wouldn't be found in the broom closet with all the other household-handled stuff before the panicked call went out for a plumber.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017 at 1:49 PM
    Miller '72 and crbnSteeladdict like this.
  10. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    Numerous folks find that direct wool contact on skin makes them itch, hence there are thin acrylic (and not cotton) linings in warm wool touques up this way. The uniforms Commonwealth soldiers wore during both wars were entirely made of wool. The NOS 1942 Cdn battle jacket I lent out to a fellow on parade with his Willys GP during a warm day came right back after he scratched himself to pieces believing it was infested with fleas. The following year he wore a long-sleeved shirt underneath and didn't suffer.
     
    crbnSteeladdict likes this.
  11. Operator1975

    Operator1975

    Sep 24, 2010
    Here we go again.......
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  12. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Hi Operator!

    (So speaking of the Devil is an invitation;))
     
  13. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Filson is pricey but it's damn good stuff. I have a pair of their double tin pants. They are perfect for doing rough work in foul weather. Where good gortex would be torn to sheds, tin cloth holds up and keeps you dry.
     
    crbnSteeladdict and Trailsawyer like this.
  14. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    781
    Mar 31, 2016
    i'd love to have a classic filson mackinaw. but all together this year i'v spent less than the cost of one (in my tool hobby).

    guess my field and stream, good jacket by the way, is gonna have to do for a few years
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  15. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Looks just like my dad's old plunger, maybe I should go get it and restore it :D
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  16. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    253
    Jul 25, 2017
    I am always taking my dad's tools too:D:thumbsup:
     
  17. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Mine doesn't have much of anything good, any tools that were any good were my grandfathers and he gave me all of them including his 1974 Waterloo made Dayton electric 6 drawer tool box ( from what I've been told this was a true value brand )
    That RE+MADE website really did have me going for a bit because it's so professional looking.
    I wonder if their restoration class teaches how to restore plungers without ruining the brown patina :D
     
    Square_peg and Miller '72 like this.
  18. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    253
    Jul 25, 2017
    I think nylon brushes, warm soapy water are the way to go:D

    I like that you have your grandfather's toolbox. I have my dad's Kennedy from when he worked as a machinist when I was younger. Not to old, not wood, but solid and holds history.

    That website had me going to.. I didn't know about the brand Best Made before so I was taken back with their video as well. I wasn't sure if the plunger video was a spoof on the axe video that I thought was a spoof on the hipster Pinterest axe scene.

    Kudos to Best Made for liberating cash from young urban professionals wanting a good axe or hatchet:cool::rolleyes:

    I like the council tools axes, from what I have viewed online.
    I can't afford or justify to my better half buying just one axe at those prices, so I am immediately not in their demographic. However if I had a budget for that I would spend it at estate sales and flea markets anyway.:thumbsup:
     
  19. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Kennedy is still in business making boxes, so is Waterloo and in fact they make a lot of little cabinets...ect found in hospitals.
    It's cool that you have something tool related that's connected to a specific thing your grandfather did.
    My grandfather did many things after ww2 from running a bar in France with his brother to running a gas station and being the vehicle maintenance man ( not sure what a specific tital may have been) for the local CHP, so I can't exactly say " he did this " " and he used this to do it ".

    My 4 favorite tools of his are a pair of Snap-on vacuum grip Needle nose pliers , a Snap-on blue point 8" adjustable that he cared enough about to put his initials on, a pair of channellock side cutters, and a pair of champion Dearment channellocks from 1933.
    As far as I know my dad's closest brother who dealt with selling the house said he didn't need any of the tools, so this tells me he didn't actually have all that many hand tools( don't remember because the last time I saw him I was 7 ). He knew how to get the job done with one box of tools in the shop and a small one in the back of his truck , as well as some basic carpentry tools.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017 at 2:20 AM
    Miller '72 likes this.
  20. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    253
    Jul 25, 2017
    That's a great history into and of your grandfather, very awesome!!

    My grandfather was a plant manager and engineer with a local company here named Ensign Bickford. He may have started there in the late '20's early '30's. When I was little he told me he was too young for WWI and to old for WWII.
    My theory is that being employed at E.B. during the war, his skills were needed home in the plant for the war effort and build up.

    My other grandad was in the infantry, marching into France alongside tanks. He and his brothers experience in WWII were not discussed or shared.

    I have always been amazed at holding and using a tool of my grandfathers or dads and how it makes me feel closer in some way to them or a memory I have or share with them.
    That's what got me started on older tool collecting years back.
    Then my five year old found the Legitimus head of my grandfather's buried in the back yard. My passion, obsession has exploded and expanded to now include axes, hatchets and nearly any wood Handled hand tool I can use here at our home, or has a practical use I can learn to use.

    My wife and I purchased my grandparents home back in 2012. My grandfather built the house in 1935. The history continues.

    As my kindergartener would say...that's a warm fuzzy dad.

    And it doesn't get better than that.

    Have a good weekend everybody!

    -Miller
     
    phantomknives likes this.

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