Best way to remove wood from coating?

Joined
Oct 2, 2009
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I have a Bushwacker Mistress, and I'm wondering what the easiest way is to remove embedded wood from the coating. I've tried rubbing alcohol and a scrubbing pad, and that got rid of most of it, but there's some left. Any ideas?
 
if I can't remove it with my fingernail or small SAK blade I don't worry about it.

WD40?

Suppose you could strip the blade.
 
If you plan to keep using it, I wouldn't worry about it. It will come off with use, but more will get stuck anyway, even if the coating gets worn off. I have plenty of satin blades with wood and sap and such stuck to them from repeated use.

If you really want to remove it, fine grit sandpaper will buff it off.
 
If you plan to keep using it, I wouldn't worry about it. It will come off with use, but more will get stuck anyway, even if the coating gets worn off. I have plenty of satin blades with wood and sap and such stuck to them from repeated use.
Yup. My DF is sporting my last back yard fire.
DSC00448.jpg

DSC00449.jpg

I like it there just fine. Adds some character and says "Somebody REALLY loves me!"
Please excuse my terrible pics!!!! :eek:
 
The best way to remove old wood is to chop new wood. It will take the old wood right off :)
 
A really angry woman's fingernail. Stong enough to strip a shell right of a turtle's back. Or so I heard...

Or, try a pin. Go slow and scrap carefully. You will get's em off. Then do it all over again on your next chopping session.
 
Just do some more chopping... It will eventually come off with the rest of the coating :)
 
What I do is spray the blade down with WD-40 then let it soak for a min or two then go over it with an old tooth brush.

It works very well.
 
I use warm water and dish soap, sometimes a 3M pad helps, but usually it just needs to be softend up with warm water and it will come right off.
 
What I do is spray the blade down with WD-40 then let it soak for a min or two then go over it with an old tooth brush.

It works very well.

+1:thumbup:
This works well for me too;)
 
I have always had great success with hot water, and a stiff nylon brush combined with dish soap.

In the field I have been known to use my fingernails.
 
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