Best way to seal the blade/hilt gap?

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Aug 13, 2008
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High end custom knives come with this gap soldered shut, then polished smooth. Get down to two hundred dollar knives and under, and you usually don't see this. Now, there are lots of materials out there that I would think would be suitable for sealing this up, even just some kind of wax which would have to be reapplied from time to time, but what's the best solution? Or do most of you just ignore the possibility of blood and such getting in there and corroding the tang?
 
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I honestly never considered that possibility. I would thing the gap in Buck Special 119 l is large enough to easily allow water and other liquids to become trapped and corrode the tang. Well I suppose a dab of Clear Epoxy, or a cheap tube of clear sealant could work. Or a tiny dab of JB Weld.
 
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That gap has always bothered me. I would think the tang would easily corrode over time when any kind of moisture is allowed to penetrate.

I recently bought some black silicone (most of my knives have black handles) to seal it but haven't used it yet so can't report. I am interested in a permanent solution, not a product that will wear off and has to be reapplied.
 
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mmm.. metal with a very low melting point? babbit metal?

good question, and i *hope* there's an answer better than JB weld, cause i'm about to try that out of desperation if someone hasn't contributed a brilliant idea soon.. i've put a stag haft on a Schrade ' Large Machete' (bowie shaped big knife!) .. and have a 1mm gap that something needs to fill. I'd thought of copper foil, over the epoxy, for esthetics, but it seems awkward. Love to hear what smart guys do. :)
 
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Eureka!!:D Fill it with Solder using a soldering Iron. No that wouldn't work for your Black blade/black handled knives. Would work for stainless. But then Solder is a great conductor and I have brushed solder clean of rust many of times so maybe not:confused:. At least it can fill in the gap nicely and be fluxed clean and flush with the hilt.
 
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Eureka!!:D Fill it with Solder using a soldering Iron. No that wouldn't work for your Black blade/black handled knives. Would work for stainless. But then Solder is a great conductor and I have brushed solder clean of rust many of times so maybe not:confused:. At least it can fill in the gap nicely and be fluxed clean and flush with the hilt.

Sorry, but that wouldn't work. For the solder to stick to steel you have to heat the guard as hot as the steel (around 400 + degrees F) and then let the silver melt. Impossible to do with the handle on. I would try some Epoxy it might work for a while.
 
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Bill DeShivs

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
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Unless the knife is brand new, I wouldn't bother-as moisture has probably aleady gotten in ans started rust. You will just be sealing it in. This problem should have been corrected before finishing the knife.
Bill
 
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Unless the knife is brand new, I wouldn't bother-as moisture has probably aleady gotten in ans started rust. You will just be sealing it in. This problem should have been corrected before finishing the knife.
Bill
What if it's never been used? How would you seal it? I would think, at the very least, some form of wax would work. What about silicone? Hot glue?
 
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There is 5 minute and 30 minute Epoxy (the min meaning how long before it sets, usually less than that). You can get it at Home Depot. Devcon makes it.
Comes with instructions, but basically you mix 2 equal parts really well and apply as you see fit. I would mask the guard and the blade and apply with a toothpic. Peel the tape before it sets.
 

Bill DeShivs

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Jun 6, 2000
Messages
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There is an epoxy putty (plumber's epoxy, or "Mighty Putty") that might work well.
Both the putty and regular epoxy can be cleaned up with a rag dampened with rubbing alcohol, before the epoxy sets.
Bill
 
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