Buck-Strider 889 impressions/problem

Joined
Jul 4, 2005
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I recently (3 days ago) purchased a new Buck-Strider 889. So far I love the knife, it is surprisingly ergonomic, came hair-popping sharp, and with a very smooth action. However, after reciving two rather severe cuts, a serious problem has come to my attention. The liner lock, which engages with no blade-play what so ever, disengages even with the most trivial of spine whacks. I can just lightly tap the sole of my boots and have it close on me. I have never had this problem with liner locks before, and to make sure it wasn't just me, I repeted the test with a cheapo $20 S&W liner lock knife, and couldn't strike it hard enough for it to disengage. Is this the trend with this model? Don't get me wrong, I love the knife, but the lock is seriously weak :( .
 
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Dec 14, 2005
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I have that same model and as I was reading your post I grabbed it and beat it on everything I could find. No problems here, maybe just a weak one from the factory. Mine has been flawless and very sharp.
 
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May 27, 2004
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dpimpc said:
I recently (3 days ago) purchased a new Buck-Strider 889. So far I love the knife, it is surprisingly ergonomic, came hair-popping sharp, and with a very smooth action. However, after reciving two rather severe cuts, a serious problem has come to my attention. The liner lock, which engages with no blade-play what so ever, disengages even with the most trivial of spine whacks. I can just lightly tap the sole of my boots and have it close on me. I have never had this problem with liner locks before, and to make sure it wasn't just me, I repeted the test with a cheapo $20 S&W liner lock knife, and couldn't strike it hard enough for it to disengage. Is this the trend with this model? Don't get me wrong, I love the knife, but the lock is seriously weak :( .

No, that definitely isn't the trend with any liner lock from Buck. Send it back to Joe Houser's attention. They'll make it right or send a new one that locks up properly.
 
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Jan 17, 2005
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Picked up an 889 on eBay (super cheap!). I also love the ergonomics - for the money it's a fantastic knife. Will see how the 420hc holds up...may go for a 882.

buck.jpg
 
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dpimpc said:
The liner lock, which engages with no blade-play what so ever, disengages even with the most trivial of spine whacks.

How far across the blade does the liner get before engaging? Is it resting on a rounded edge, or is it well behind the blade?
 
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Carl64 said:
How far across the blade does the liner get before engaging? Is it resting on a rounded edge, or is it well behind the blade?

The liner engages right in the middle of the blade, there are no rounded edges that I can see. However, the bottom on the blade slopes up towards the left side of the handle ever so slighty, in other words, the bottom of the blade where the lock sits is not flat. Could that be the problem? Should I still send it back?
 
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Dec 31, 2005
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"I can just lightly tap the sole of my boots and have it close on me."

if it was mine I'd be sending it somewhere. You can't even use it to open small packages without waiting to get bitten badly.
 
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dpimpc said:
The liner engages right in the middle of the blade, there are no rounded edges that I can see. However, the bottom on the blade slopes up towards the left side of the handle ever so slighty, in other words, the bottom of the blade where the lock sits is not flat. Could that be the problem? Should I still send it back?

You should definitely send it in because not all Buck linerlocks fail so easily.

The slope is going to be there on all of them. That's how they make it stop before passing the blade entirely.

When the blade is open, does the liner look like a mostly continuous curve right up until it hits the blade, or is most of the bend/curve closer to the base of the leaf spring and mostly straight where it hits the blade?

Some of the Buck linerlocks I have seen (NXT, Odyssey) have a liner lock that is more of a long continuous bend compared to many other brands which usually have most of the bending right near the base of the liner leaf. I am guessing the ease of which you get variations in a long bend can vary the ultimate angle of engagement between the liner and blade, and also the reach of the liner, resulting in the variety of liner engagement people are getting, both in terms of security and the exact spot where the liner hits the slope. Some have no problem, others like you have a nasty one.
 
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Mar 6, 2005
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...I'm not familiar with the knife you are discussing...but the condition you are describing is something that should be addressed by someone who has a working knowledge of the processes used to produce it...:-D...
 

CJ Buck

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Apr 15, 1999
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898
Okay enough enough...send it in and we will take care of it. Hard to say exactly what is not happening until we look at it. Needless to say it should not be disengaging. Liner lock engagement is very sensitive to both surface condition and very small dimension changes.

Send it to:

Joe Houser
660 S. Lochsa Street
Post Falls ID 83854

If you want to call it is (208) 262-0500 (hit "0" for an immediate body and ask for Joe)

Don't address it to Buck Knives as that invites pilferage.
 
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Jul 4, 2005
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CJ Buck said:
Okay enough enough...send it in and we will take care of it.

Thanks, I do really like the knife a lot by the way, I never meant to imply anything otherwise. It may take me a week or two, as I am currently out of town on business. Thanks again. :thumbup:
 
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Nov 5, 2004
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I've read about the "spine whack" test before, but I've never been able to understand exactly what it means. :confused: Can someone explain? Just curious.
 

Daniel L

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Nov 2, 1998
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Matt,

WARNING: tape the edge of the blade to prevent any accidental cuts.

The spine whack has a few variations but this is how I do mine:

1. Open the knife and get a piece of 4x2 wood (or some other hard surface.)
2. Hold the knife with your thumb and index finger at the butt end of the knife.
3. Swing the knife down so that the blade spine hits the wood.

The amount of force of the swing is variable - you can do a light tap to a full on swing. Liner locks have been known to fail at light taps.

You might also want to pad the hard surface to prevent any damage to your knife's finish.

You can also spine whack the palm of your hand, or the edge of the table.

Is it a fair test? IMHO it is provided we're not talking about full force swings. But certainly any lock should be able withstand moderate spine whacks.

Here's a link to some specific liner lock tests:

http://www.agrussell.com/knife_information/knife_encyclopedia/articles/liner_lock_tests.html
 

CJ Buck

Moderator
Joined
Apr 15, 1999
Messages
898
I am not a big proponent for "spine whack tests". It is much more appropriate for testing a lockback then a liner lock or some other locking mechanisms.

Pressure on the back of the knife "spine" will tell you how much of a chance that knife has of closing on your fingers during use. Once lockbacks fail they wear the corners off the engagement of the lock thus are forever less everytime they are over-pressured. I would love to have some knife pieces and be talking in person right about now...hard to explain otherwise...

Liners can disengage if the knife "flexes" under impact. A completely different circumstance causing the same test result. Under use, a liner lock that has failed a whack test may, or may not, pose an injury threat. A lock back that has failed should never be fully trusted again.

Sometimes the rocker gets bent and now is an an angle that does not promote good lock up.

(important note with lockbacks is that sometimes pocket lint will fill up the pocket where the rocker would engage to lock.)
 
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Jul 4, 2005
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I will finally be sending it in this weekend. I live very close (Spokane) to Post Falls, and a family member is actually the city manager over there. Sorry it has taken me so long, I have been extremely busy. Thanks again for the help Mr. Buck.
 
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Apr 15, 2005
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mine failed too. I didn't do a spine "whack", I just took a piece of plastic and tapped the spine and it closed right up.
 
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Jul 4, 2005
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Well I decided to not be lazy and mail it, so I just drove the twenty mintues to Buck's headquarters over in Post Falls today and dropped off my knife with the warrenty department. Then because I'm a sucker, I bought the upgraded version with G-10 handles and an ATS-34 Bos heat treated blade. It's perfect in every way. Oh, and apparently my Uncle has infact met one of/or both of the Bucks when they opened the factory, he is the city manager of Post Falls. I thought that was sorta cool. Anyways, all is well.:thumbup:
 
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