"Buck" Yachtsman

mps

Joined
Feb 17, 1999
Messages
155
Did, (as I suspect), Camillus actually make the "Buck" Yachtsman? I have it from the Buck rep that Camillus made many of their slipjoint folders and that Buck never actually made the Yachtsman.

If in fact it was made by Camillus, (as would seem almost certain), then who's idea was the hollow ground blade? Was that a Buck spec or are all Camillus marlingspike knives made with a hollow grind? It would seem that the hg is one of this knife's 3 main shortcomings.

I've used these knives for years and while I generally really like them, I'd think a flat grind would be far preferable for a knife made to be repeatedly pounded through rope.

Is there any chance that Camillus will make a marlingspike knife that features both a locking spike and locking blade ala Mycherin?

Thanks,
mps-- dreaming of a D2 or Talonite locking rope knife
 

Phil Gibbs

Cutlery Student
Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 11, 1998
Messages
1,714
MPS,
Unfortunately I am unable to comment on your question regarding any Buck product as we do not discuss other manufacturers specifications even IF we were involved in the manufacture.

The Camillus Marlin Spike Knives are flat ground 440A stainless steel.
What do you consider the other shortcomings of these knives to be?
 

mps

Joined
Feb 17, 1999
Messages
155
Phil,
Thanks for replying. I'd just about given up on getting a response at all.

As for things that could stand to be updated on the Buck/Camillus Yachtsman:

1. Both blade and marlingspike need to lock.

2. Edge retention is not particularly good by today's standards. This could be because of the hollowgrind or it could be because of the relatively low grade of steel or perhaps cost efficient (but not great heat treat) or a combination of those things. Having seen some very rust resistant low cost stainless blends capable of decent edge retention, I'd think that this problem could, and should be fixed. There's no reason for a knife designed to cut rope to perform as poorly as the Buck does in that arena.

3. The weight of the knife and the handle to blade ratio could both stand to be improved. The weight goes hand in hand with the brass liners and heavy marlingspike, I realize, but it's a bit much for pocket carry. I usually carry mine in a nylon belt sheath, or in or on a toolbag or kit. Offering a customer the choice of either a nylon belt sheath, or a swivel clip that clipped the bail, (or shackle tool) to belt loop or tool kit would be a welcome addition. Actually, I'd like to see a Zytel handled one that had either a pocket clip, or a snap attachment ala Spyderco "snap-it".

OK, having given that blunt rundown of stuff that I think could be improved, you probably wonder why I even carry one at all. Well, in spite of it's quirks, it's still a good work knife. I keep a couple new, unused ones on hand to give to tradespeople that I wish to reward, or want to show the marlingspike concept to. The marlingspike is really far more useful to many trades than just the rope work that started it all. I've given "yachtsmen" to electricians, HVAC techs, a farmer, and of course I've used them in a variety of trades for years.

I've also given away several hawkbladed Duratools just because they're cheap enough to be considered job favors or something. Hmm, a durable edged hawkbill with locking hawkblade and marlingspike. Now, there's an idea for you. ;-)

mps
 

Phil Gibbs

Cutlery Student
Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 11, 1998
Messages
1,714
mps,

Thanks for the comments. Have you tried the flat ground Camillus marlin spike? This model is also available with a full serration that may perform better on rope. Just a thought.
 
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