How To Buying new edge pro, want advice.

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Aug 13, 2016
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Hey guys, I'm ordering an edge pro apex and I have a few questions. How do I use it? I know the basics, but Im looking for tips on how to use it correctly. Do I do edge leading or edge trailing strokes? How much pressure should I use? Which stone should I start with when reprofiling? 120? What about if I just want to touch up a knife? Which stones do I use then? I read that high vanadium (>3%) steels require diamond stones. Do high wear resistance and hardness also fit in that category? Do I really need the drill stop collar? I was told that it didn't do much since the difference in stone height is so little. Are there any good instructional videos? I tried to find Some and I found one that was crappy resolution and didn't cover much. Would the professional model video work?
I'm basically trying to know everything about the thing. Any advice helps.

Thanks guys,

Bo
 

miso2

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Nov 19, 2014
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My way.

Goal:
Achieve a refined coarse (or toothy) edge.

Stones:
Venev diamond #150 and Congress Tools Moldmaster #240 (silicon carbide).

Things to be cautious:
(1) Stage position and knife positioning. You need to keep these constant throughout a session and for each knife. I make sure the angle each time with an angle cube. Stop collar did not work for me. This can be challenging with knives other than flat grind.
(2) Scratches on the blade. You need to protect the blade with masking tape.
(3) Pressure. You don't really need pressure more than the weight of the handle/stone. I tend to apply too much pressure near the tip (causing a big burr there, hard to remove).
(4) Tip grind. When you position your drop point or clip point knife perpendicular to the stage, you will get a wide bevel near the tip. You need to find a good angle to prevent it (if you care).
(5) Stone flatness.

Procedure:
(1) Push and pull strokes (both edge leading and trailing) with either of the stones until a burr on the entire edge is raised (Feeling the burr should be easy at these grits).
(2) Flip and repeat.
(3) Deburr with edge leading strokes with decreasing number of strokes and pressure (with the same stone).
(4) Light strop on leather with aluminum oxide compound.
(5) Cut a sheet of paper towel placed on flat hard wood by pressing the edge down firmly to fold and weaken the remaining burr (BCMW method). The entire edge should cut the towel at this point. if not, go back to (3).
(6) Light strop.
(7) Run the edge on wood or cork or thumb nail lightly. The edge should feel somewhat consistent (no rough spots).
(8) Done.

Sometimes I use the diamond, but mostly the silicon carbide stone.
Optionally, I use diamond suspension at 1 µm to further refine the edge.

Hope this helps.
 
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I recommend the kit with the 120, 220, 400, 600, and 1000 factory stones. Although I have a full set of Choseras, I rarely use them.

You do not need the drill stop collar. I get excellent results w/o one. You could get one later if you decide you need one. I wouldn't complicate things at the beginning.

If Miso2's instructions (above) and Edge Pro's don't work, contact them. The were helpful to me.
 
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Which stone should I start with when reprofiling? 120?
Yes and I would get a more coarse one if you can. Diamond is the way to go. I have the 120 Jende (not diamond; it is similar to the Shapton Glass stones) and it was a waste of money. It is too soft. Do not buy this stone.
But it is a grand example for my next argument for buying and using the stop collar. The stones will wear at different rates and the amount of flattening you have to do to each stone over time will vary the stone thicknesses even more
and
the Jende 120 was vastly thicker than any of the other stones and it wears fast so it changes a lot over time.
No doubt the diamond plates are different thicknesses than the friable stones so again you want the stop collar. I can't even imagine working without the collar. Using sharpie after every stone change would drive me nuts.

It depends on the quality of end result you wish to achieve but if say one is using four stones and only two of those stones are actually abrading steel at the edge and the others are further up the bevel effectively not effecting the edge then you are wasting time using those even though the edge you get from the two stones that are on the edge actually cuts something.


What about if I just want to touch up a knife? Which stones do I use then?
Depends on how dull your blade is but even if my edge is nearly shave sharp I like to use say a 220 or 500 because I want the bevel to be flat and not have to create a secondary bevel to get down on the edge. If your sharpening bevel is a little bit wide then it takes longer to abrade the steel to get to the edge and maintain the single sharpening bevel.



I read that high vanadium (>3%) steels require diamond stones. Do high wear resistance and hardness also fit in that category?
Most definitely . . . with a qualification . . . if your goal is just a sharp edge you can get a sharp edge on the high wear resistance and super hard steel by steepening the angle of the stone and effectively increasing the force per square inch so the steel is cut because you have lessened the area you are cutting. But you can't go on like that; you will eventually have to knock all that steel behind the edge back by abrading it off and to do that you will need the diamond stone(s).

and . . . I can get a hair whittling edge on my S110V blades but the edge is inferior and the edge retention is crap because the vanadium carbides have just been scooped out and or not shaped. It took me a while to realize this. Even with S30V I am convinced diamond plates, at least for the final finest stone is a must for edge longevity.

Do I really need the drill stop collar? Yes, yes, yes if you want to do this right and use the heck out of your stones enough to wear them.

Are there any good instructional videos?
Oh totally ! ! !
I will post some links in a little while.
 
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Stop collar

Here is the Owner Of The Edge Pro Company, Ben Dale, demonstrating step by step how to use his little miracle. Probably if you look on YouTube below it after you load it ON YOUTUBE there should be more advanced vids by him.
Heck . . . I was wrong.
Here is a link to all the more advanced ones I was thinking of.
>>>>>LINK
PS: and you can order a DVD from where you buy your Edge Pro
 
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And finally I would suggest to start out you make a check list of steps, step by step, to follow from the instructions.
Follow the steps exactly and you get an edge that will make your mouth drop open. Don't drop the knife though you might cut your leg off.

We are talking a hair whittling edge without even having to look at the edge after the initial wire edge, just keep going until the final stone then debur if there is anything there to debur. I find with the really good steel alloys the bur just disappears.

Skip a step . . . cut a corner . . . fail to keep the stone's pores fairly cleaned out
and
you may wind up with an edge that is less than blisteringly sky rockets over the moon sharp.
 
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Miso2: yes, that was very helpful. I have a better understanding of the edge pro now, thank you.

Wdavidr: okay, thank you I will do that.

Wowbagger: so you know where I can get a more course stone? Are the diamond stones more course than the 120? That I'd really like to know.
What are sscondary/micro bevels actually for?
Thank you very much. Great info!
 
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Sorry it send my post without my consent.
Wow: how do you keep pores clean? Levelling plate? I will watch those videos soon and order the DVD.

Thank you everyone,

Bo
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2016
Messages
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Guys, what do you reccomend I do when I have a full flat or high flat grind? Should I just press the grind against the edge pro table or should I try to keep it in the air so the flat stays flat on the table?

Thanks,

Bo
 

miso2

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Lay it down on the stage.
You can find the edge angle using the Sharpie method or an angle cube.
 
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miso2

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Nov 19, 2014
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You will find that some flat ground knives are not completely flat and that you can wiggle them vertically on the stage.
I found it very frustrating, as this could change the sharpening angle during a session, resulting in an inconsistent edge.
You need to find a sweet spot to secure the blade.
 
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You mean they have some convexity? So they kind of roll back and forth or do you mean something else?

Thanks,

Bo
 
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