Calling all bowhunters

Joined
Dec 28, 2007
Messages
1,061
I want to start archery, maybe even bowhunting. I need a bow, not a compound one, a long bow or recurve, with about 50-60 lbs draw weight (powerfull enough for small to medium size game?). I also need a website I can get it from.:eek: I would like to keep it under $200 if thats possible.
Thanks.
 
Joined
Jun 2, 2007
Messages
610
I've bought two compounds on ebay so far. I went that route because I wanted to try it out without laying out much cash. By the time I see any shortcomings in what I bought, it'll be time to upgrade anyway because I'll know what I'm looking for.

BTW, the compounds I bought were 60 and 80 bucks (older but perfectly functional). I spent more than that on (new) arrows, lol.

Since you're local, try 'Kyanne'. They're an archery store that the owners run out of their basement in Pitt Meadows. Their driveway and carport are set up as a range as well so you can try stuff out. Call first though if you want to stop by in person.
Contact info:
KYANNE ARCHERY SUPPLIES
19811 - 116A AVENUE
PITT MEADOWS,
BRITISH COLUMBIA, V3Y 1N9
CANADA
Tel:604 465 3651 (Fax: 465 8925)
E-mail: kyanne@infoserve.net

Their whole family is into the sport, so they have lots of local connections as well.
 
Joined
Oct 31, 2007
Messages
9,833
3Wolves, i have a Chek-Mate Kings pawn recurve, barely used, but the draw might be a little light for your needs (24lbs @ 28" draw). Its an excellent target and bird bow (quail, pheasant etc).

if your interested in trying it out to get the feel of a recurve , let me know, i'm i Vancouver, travel thru the Valley sometimes on the weekends.
 
Joined
Mar 21, 2006
Messages
10,035
Talk to Mtnfolk Mike. He knows a thing or 2 about bows.



hhmmm... i guess you can say that....:eek:
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3-wolves--

right on... i would love to help ya out....i have been an avid tradional archer/bowhunter for about 8-9 years now... both of my boys are also avid archers... they both started when they were 4...
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i started off shooting a recurve and have long since, switched to longbows... i make all of my/our own tackle, with the exception of my bows.. one of these days i'll crank one out...i actually have 2 staves drying as we speak..
let me know if you need some wood arrows made... :D i have a little arrow building set up in my garage.. i have been making them for years... they're a lot of fun..


if you're looking to hunt with your bow, as stated... it is very important, when starting off shooting a trad. bow, that you try and build muscle memory and develop a solid anchor point... with a heavier bow, that tends to be a little more difficult to achieve... the body can get into bad habits(i.e. snap shooting and floating anchors:thumbdn:)... you should try and look into starting off with a bow in the 40#-50# range.. once you're all dialed in, you can move up in weight... i have 8 bows and the one i shoot the most is 47#'s @ 28 in... my draw length is only 26 in. so i am shooting 43#'s... that is perfect for all day 3-d shooting or a day of stump shooting @ our local range.. the bow that i hunt, which was custom built for me, draws 58#s @ my draw length... the thing is a rocket...:eek:

there are a number of places to buy from online... however you gotta be careful when buying anything used.. one of the main suppliers, is like the cabelas of trad. archery.. check them out www.3riversarchery.com or www.kustom-king.com they'll have everything you need... you should also check out the bowhunters handbook by t.j. conrads... it's a great read for archers of all abilities... t.j. is the founder/editor of tradtional bowhunter magazine.. you can purchase the book from they're site.. www.tradbow.com

hope this helps.. let me know if you have anymore questions... feel free to email if you like..

mike
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2004
Messages
775
I have used my buddies recurve, Samick SKB, the it is only 50"long
It is a Korean Horse bow, short libs but very wicked Ithink it was in the 50lbs range at 30 inches

I shoot a compound and within a few days of practice I was fairly proficent with the little bow, I am thinking of getting on this year.


just a though


cya
jimi
 
Joined
Nov 7, 2004
Messages
1,011
I have been building and using my own archery tackle for about three decades. I harvest most of my own bow woods (I often trade yew for osage), and arrow shaft wood so I rarely have to deal with any outside sources these days. However, I still purchase a few small things from 3riversarchery.com (Mike gave the link) when I need something I can't make. They have been real good to do business with. I have also done business Raptor Archery when 3-Rivers didn't have what I was looking for.

I seriously need to take some better and more photos of my archery "warehouse".
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Joined
Dec 28, 2007
Messages
1,061
Hmm, I would really like to make a traditional longbow myself, much cheaper than a production one and I have more fun.:D What kind of skills and tools are required. Is there a place I can buy the wooden staves? I don't have enough patience to gather and dry them myself.:eek:
 
Joined
Dec 3, 2005
Messages
174
I make my bows.
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You don't need much money or tools,some practice and patience when working.As for drying wood it doesn't have to be for months.
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2006
Messages
7,035
I bought a PSE Impala recurve a few years ago to start myself in archery. It has a 50# draw. When I got it, it was $150 new.

3RiversArchery is the bee's knees.

Also, get a few issues of Traditional Bowhunter and Primitive Archer magazines. There's also a book: The Traditional Bowhunter's Handbook that's good to get.

Look in the classified section of Traditional Bowhunter, there was a guy that sold almost finished longbows for something like $60. You had to do minor finishing and such. Probably the best way to "make your own" rather than go from nothing to trying to make one from scratch.
 
Joined
Nov 7, 2004
Messages
1,011
Hmm, I would really like to make a traditional longbow myself, much cheaper than a production one and I have more fun.:D What kind of skills and tools are required. Is there a place I can buy the wooden staves? I don't have enough patience to gather and dry them myself.:eek:

Only the very basic of tools are required to build your own selfbow. In fact, I have made several decent bows using only a knife (class demonstration), but I have made hundreds of bows, too. You will want to get yourself a *dull* farrier's file. You can find a farrier's file at any store that supplies horseshoeing tools. I get mine from the fella that does my horseshoeing (this is the best bet since they are often glad to get rid of their dull files). You will also want a reasonably *dull* draw knife. One can purchase his own cabinet scrapers or use an old knife that he can hang on to. I will either use a broad axe to judiciously chop the bow out of the stave (though still considered to be a "stave" until it is tillered), or I will take shortcuts and use a bandsaw. Just depends on how much of a hurry I am in. Initially, for the first dozens of bows, you don't want the activity or thinking "hurry" involved with bow building. A guy is better off soaking his head in a bucket of ice water until he sobers up enough to realize that his seasoned stave cost him $90.00, give or take, and most mistakes will only turn his stave into something fit for the tinderbox. Other basic tools will be needed (or desired) also, but ya have to start somewhere.

Skills: Any woodworking background is going to be helpful. The carpenters, cabinet makers, wood-carvers, etc., in my classes seem to catch on real fast if they pay attention to the details and instruction. Myself, I made several bows before taking a class taught by John Strunk (one of the authors of The Traditional Bowyer's Bible). I was really able to refine and define my skills once I was finished with John's class. You will need to do some reading and study on basic bow designs and materials. I would highly recommend (to begin with) The Traditional Bowyer's Bible, Volume One. This book is available at Bois d' Arc Press or from one of the many traditional archery stores. The more you read and study on bow making, the more this will be reflected in your hands-on activity. Some students that do their homework are able to produce (within a couple of bows) a bow in the 50 - 60 pound range at their draw length. Most of my bows are tillered in the 60 - 75 pound range (some of these bows are backed with sinew, bamboo, rawhide, other woods or colorful skins, etc.) and I have successfully used these bows in dry Africa to wet Alaska. Learning to tiller and balance the bow limbs is usually the most difficult process of bowmaking for the beginner and experienced alike. And, there will be those times when you do everything perfect, and the bow still fails for some internal reason. Just a part of working with a natural product. :)

You can buy good staves from Raptor Archery (raptorarchery.com). Just tell Ted that you are a beginner and he will choose the best stave for you. You certainly don't need an osage stave full of "character" when learning to build a bow. :)
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2007
Messages
771
Check out tradgang or www.primitivearcher.com

I suggest you start with a light weight bow to learn good form.I suggest 30-40 pounds at your draw to start.You will also need to learn how to pick the correct arrows and tune your bow and arrows.

I'm a regular at tradgang.PM me here or over there and I'll help in any way I can.
 
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