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Can someone help me identify this Tomahawk?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by AncientFinder, Jul 29, 2018.

  1. AncientFinder

    AncientFinder

    4
    Jul 29, 2018
    Hey guys, I just got this forged steel tomahawk, along with an incredible firearm collection and arrowhead/point/spear collection. Anyway, I know nothing of blacksmithing and forging techniques. Does this look new? It looks like newer welding marks, but again, that is not my area of expertise. Also, what type of style/age/region? I've never seen one with a beveled pointed head.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2018
  2. AncientFinder

    AncientFinder

    4
    Jul 29, 2018
    [​IMG]
     
  3. AncientFinder

    AncientFinder

    4
    Jul 29, 2018
    [​IMG]
     
  4. AncientFinder

    AncientFinder

    4
    Jul 29, 2018
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Well it appears to be brazed together ( sort of like welding but brass ) so I would guess it's purely decorative.
     
  6. Kevin Houtzager

    Kevin Houtzager

    691
    Jun 25, 2017
    That isn't brazing: That's TIG welded They actually did a nice job doing it to.
     
  7. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    They did do a fine job, for some reason it looked different than a weld to me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2018
  8. survivor45

    survivor45

    105
    Feb 15, 2018
    I wonder if it a High School metal shop project.
    Is the head a threaded pipe thread ?
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  9. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Could be but I know for a fact that a project like that now a days would get your shop teacher fired and the kid a short vacation ending with a "Manifestation Hearing" - formal threat assessment.

    Don't agree with it but that's the world we live in lol.
    We made crossbows in wood shop with a target shoot off at the end of the project - those days are gone I guess. Sorry for the aside there on your post.
     
    Tin.Man likes this.
  10. survivor45

    survivor45

    105
    Feb 15, 2018
    Oh yes.
    I should have put that in my post.
    "A pre 1990 metal shop project"
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  11. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Within the past 10 years a friend of mine was allowed to make a handfull of knives in his highschool shop class.
    Of course his highschool was in a rural town , so this may have made a bit of difference.
    I'm sure this would be a no go at most schools in this day and age though.

    Now something like a high school shop project could be very likely for sure, could just as easily have been made at home too.
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  12. TROB

    TROB

    28
    Sep 15, 2016
    Ah yes, a fine specimen indeed. Reminds me of a piece in my collection. A very rare, ceremonial circumcision hatchet, made by a drunk indian. My stepdad got swindled out of whatever he paid for it, but I still keep it around because it was a gift. It’s just a thin piece of sheet metal, welded to a pipe.
    [​IMG]
     
    garry3, Square_peg, Agent_H and 2 others like this.
  13. Kevin Houtzager

    Kevin Houtzager

    691
    Jun 25, 2017
    It does look a lot like brazing, but there is a difference: Mig welding or brazing for that matter are more on top of the material your welding. TIG welding is penetrating the metal. Way more chance to warp if not properly done, but if done right far stronger. Those welds are as they are if done right, and haven't seen any grinding.

    So could it be a highschool metal shop project? Yeah it could be, but if so: Thats probably the best student out there As far as I can see the welds in itself are from such a high level of skill that it's hard to believe that a student did that?
     
    Hickory n steel and Agent_H like this.
  14. TROB

    TROB

    28
    Sep 15, 2016
    Hardly...the welds in the OP look sloppy to me, like a beginner did it.

    Here’s a pic of someone’s first attempt at welding. Upper right was done by a pro, by hand. Upper left is the very next weld after the first attempt, which is that crap at the bottom. Upper left looks pretty close to what is on that axe
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2018
    garry3 and Bradenk1987 like this.
  15. Grease

    Grease

    May 10, 2012

    I have maybe 20 hours of welding experience and I can do that. If you have the skill to write in cursive, you have the skill to weld in a straight line like that. All it takes is getting the voltage/wire feed speed right and keeping your hand steady.
     
  16. Kevin Houtzager

    Kevin Houtzager

    691
    Jun 25, 2017
    You do know that welding an axehead is quite a bit different than sheetmetal right? An axe isn't uniform to say the least. So getting a weld as on that piece of super clean uniform stainless steel sheetmetal will never happen. The difference is that its forged and regular steel. It will never have a uniform surface to begin with. And if you don't believe me, try for yourself? See what happens? Totally different then say welding a rollcage.
     
  17. gben

    gben

    363
    Nov 26, 2014
    How many here have spent years welding as a living or had formal training for it? I have.

    Weld penetration has nothing to do with the method of welding and everything to do with the experience of the welder and how he prepares the object to be welded.

    Steel will turn colors when high-heat is applied and cooled at various speeds, so the yellow color of some of the joints may be due to heat or because it is brass brazing, only the person holding it in their hand with the experience to tell the difference is going to be qualified to comment on that.

    A really skilled welder would be able to take a tig, mig, stick or brazing rod and join those parts together with any method and nobody could tell which equipment was used if a coat of paint was thrown over top. Welding is not a black art that takes a special person, all it takes is a little good instruction, such as a student would get from a competent metal-shop instructor, and anyone is quickly on their way. As with anything if you get no proper training then you can struggle for years and blame everything but yourself and spread misinformation about welding while you are at it.
     
    garry3 and jake pogg like this.

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