Centofante III

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Nov 2, 2005
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I have read positive comments about the Centofante III and the thin blade. I'm concerned that the blade may be too thin for everyday use and would appreciate your comments.

Thanks,
 
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Jun 8, 2005
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The Centofante is plenty tough for every day use. It won't let you down. Also consider the side bonus that it has a full stainless steel liner to beef up those long handles.

Just use it as a knife should be used--a sharpened pry bar it is not. But as long as you stick to cutting things, you'll never have to worry about it. It's a brilliant knife, for the money.
 
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Apr 6, 2004
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Actually I think the steel liner only covers half the handle. I don't think has full steel liners. I will have to check it out if my gf ever gives mine back.

As to the question at hand though, the blade is very thin, but not to the point that it is flimsy or anything. It is an awesome slicer, and a great edc knife.
 
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Dec 18, 2005
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It's definitely not flimsy but it's not intended for prying. I think my liner goes all the way down the handle. Got my first nick on this knife the other day. Factory sharp is quite sharp.

I have noticed that the clip must screw into the liner and makes the joint extra tight. I'm thinking about changing to tip up just to avoid this issue. I have a sample of militech on the way, hopefully that will also help. I just can't get my lock backs flickable.
 
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Artfully Martial said:
The centofante has one full steel liner. I think it's on the side opposite the clip, but I can't remember.

That is what I meant. It has a full steel liner, but only on one side.
 
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Feb 8, 2005
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Funny you should mention the Cento III - I was just cutting a sandwich up with mine:) In looking at it - the steel liner runs down one side. The blade is just barely over 3", so it shouldn't cause concern in EDC type use to the sheeple, though the blade shape is a little different. Mine doesn't get a second glance, for the most part. I would agree that it's a brilliant design and it's definitely a slicer - right in there with my Gray Caly Jr. It should work fine for EDC type things. Mine is not used as my primary EDC users - my FRN Delica and BM Mini-Grip are my primary users with a Ka-Bar/Dozier folding hunter as my beater during the week. My Cento III, Gray Caly Jr. and Camillus Blaze fit in the middle and get used when I don't feel like using the Mini-Grip or Delica. I've had mine for several months and it's worked great:) Yes, I do carry more than that on a normal basis:)

- gord
 
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Dec 18, 2005
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I could swear that the clip is on the liner side. I have it on me now but don't want to pull it out here. It made a big difference when I put my clip back on after loosening the pivot pin. Back to original tightness, in fact.
 
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Oct 31, 2000
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The Centofante is great for my everyday use.
It's just right for light-to-medium use, and not flimsy at all.
It handles well in a number of different grips, and it carry's quite well (IWB, etc.) also.
The full-length steel liner is on the clip side and is nested, that is the liner sits (nests) in a shallow cavity on the inside of the handle, with the liner surrounded by a narrow lip of FRN.
I have a few Centofante 3's. The one that I carry just about everyday since I bought it a year ago still has good lock-up, no horizontal play, and smooth opening action.
Great knife.
 
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Jun 18, 2000
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I don't think that the blade is too thin for everyday use.

Consider that it is still as thick or thicker than most Victorinox and Wenger Swiss Army Knives, which have served many a Soldier, Sailor, Airman, and Marine (and Coasties too) for many many years.

And it's as thick or thicker than alot of traditional stockmans and Barlows--and those knives have been used by cattlemen, construction workers, and farmers for decades.

The only thing I don't like about the Vesuvius/Centofante is the sharp peak above the thumb-hole.
I filed mine and rounded it for more comfort.

Good luck,
Allen.
 
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Dec 18, 2005
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Sorry to hijack the thread just a tiny bit, but how have you guys gotten the opening and closing action to smoothen out? I tried to pry the handle slabs apart and was getting nowhere. I then undid the clip and pryed again with a small tiny amount of success. At this point, I cut myself trying to flip the knife closed. I then put the clip back on and am now back to square one. I washed it out a bit with alcohol and applied WD-40 - hasn't helped a bit.
 
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Jun 8, 2005
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Most lockbacks have inferior actions relative to modern locking mechanisms...the best way to deal with it is to develop a more efficient technique. When you get really good, people won't even be able to see motion before the knife opens.
 
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Nov 13, 2004
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I received one for Christmas and I don't feel any flimsiness to it at all. I like the light weight feel, and even though the scales are FRN, they are rather sleek and comfortable.

Use it for its intended purpose: CUTTING.

As some one wiser than I said in this forum once:

"A Knife is the MOST expensive and LEAST effective PryBar that you can buy!"
 
Joined
Dec 18, 2005
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Yes, the friction of the lock bar on the blade is definitely a factor. However, I see people mentioning being able to flick their lockback spydercos all the time. That's just not happening here. Not even close. I'm hoping that the militech lube will make a difference.
 
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Dec 18, 2005
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Oh, where to begin. Maybe I have deformed hands, but I get no grip/leverage on the knife in any position close to putting a finger on the lock. The butt of the handle is nearly at the top of my palm and there is simply no leverage. If the lock were near the blade itself, I'd have no problem. The lock is very stiff and tight and the only hand I have with fingers strong enough to mangle its way into pushing the lockbar down without putting my fingers around the blade so that it can't be flicked out is my left hand, and it takes a lot of concentration and effort to do so. Naturally, the centafante is right hand clip only. Doesn't matter, I still have no leverage and it takes me insane concentration and effort to push that lockbar down, even if I had leverage since the lock is so stiff.

Lastly, even with the bar pushed down, when I flick it, the blade still sticks to the handle slabs and doesn't extend to fully locked position 2/3 of the time. This would have been easy after I pryed the slabs open last night, but the knife has returned to stock NIB stiffness after I put the clip back on.

Must just be me...
 
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Jun 8, 2005
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Make sure you're using proper flicking technique. The first problem people run into with spyderholes is using the pad of their thumb instead of their nail. If you flick with the pad, you'll slow it down with the pad when it passes out of your reach. For some reason, this doesn't happen with the nail.

But it's best if you start developing the wrist flick technique without touching the blade at all. When you have really developed it, you can flick tiny knives, even assisted opening knives--like Scallions for instance, without touching the blade or flipper at all. It's slow going, but in the end, the wave can be so small that it's an extremely tiny motion that opens the knife. Almost invisible.

It's also a lot more fun.
 
Joined
Dec 18, 2005
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That's funny. With my hands, the pad of my thumb never leaves the range of the thumb hole. I always use the pad and can open it that way plenty fast. It's just stiff going and the pad sometimes slides off because it's so stiff. Sliding off is worse with my nail because it has less purchase. As for the wrist flick, I can flick liner locks with a little tension tweaking, but with my lockbacks, they don't even budge out of their retention area. Well, I feel bad for hijacking the thread. We should at least try to keep to direct centofante related topics.

It is stiff. Might just be me.

The new centofante IV is pretty cool, as well. Wharncliff blade makes it easier to sharpen and the 3" blade is legal in many more places than 3"+, like the centofante III. I wanted the belly for my knife, but I would love a centofante IV if I had another knife with a belly.
 
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Flicking with the pad of your thumb is an inferior way. Begin to use your thumb nail. Flicking with your pad is best accomplished by using your pad to open the blade and finishing it with a wrist flick. You'll notice a thumb print smeared down away from the hole over the blade.

The reason that the spyderhole leaves the range of your thumb pad is that when you flick, you do it in a straight line, not the circle motion you do when you open it normally (where it DOES stay in range). Just curled up thumb/open thumb motion. It is probably 15x harder to flick with the pad of your thumb, but not impossible. The pad smears down the side when it leaves the hole (runs out of range) but the nail flick just pops out. I don't know why. The former slows it down. If you really want to stick with the thumb pad, just use wrist motion to actually flick it, the pad to get it a little open before the flick. If you use the thumb nail flick, you don't have to have any wrist motion. You can make it look like an assisted opener.
 
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