Chris Reeve One piecers?

DBH

Joined
Aug 3, 2001
Messages
1,649
Who uses Chris Reeve ne piece knives for their primary backpacking, kiking, general outdoor use knife? I am curently thinking of purchasing a Project I or II and would like some feedback. How does the circular handle feel for choppin use? Let me know.

Thanks in advance
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2000
Messages
535
Maybe its just me, but while I love the knives, I do not think any 7.5 inch blade knife is ideal for chopping. 9-9.5 and longer would be minimum. I do not find the reeves handles to be that abrasive, but then do not chop that much with them. They are fairly light, nicely balanced overall do everything field knives. I dont see them as choppers per se.
 
Joined
May 26, 2000
Messages
1,922
I don't own a Reeve one piece, first of all. A few reasons why.

I like the spear point Project I. It would indeed be better at around 9" to 9.5" IMHO. I've seen what was either a special run or a discontinued Project-I/II looking knife at 9", don't know when they were made.

I do agree that 9" is kind of a minimum for chopping.

If you find the round handle too abrasive, tennis raquet handle tape makes a great solution....grippy, cheap, replaceable, and increases the diameter.

If you want a one piece, hollow handle knife, this is the one IMHO.
 
Joined
Jul 22, 2001
Messages
1,417
DBH , some food for thought. The "one piece" knives Chris makes are
all stout all metal construction that is true. BUT that presents some not so
obvious negatives when compared to other equally stout knives.

Negatives that I see.......
The knurled handle grip while provideing a secure grip will tear at
your skin during hard use such as chopping. The metal will also
freeze to bare skin during extreme cold. That is why military knives
use leather.

The blades are A-2 steel. Not a big minus but it rust very easily.

Why would anyone want to keep all of their emergency gear in ONE
spot?? I spread mine over my person. Redunancy again and again.
The claim to fame of the hollow handle is nice ,but let's be realistic
that no thinking woodsman wants all his eggs in one basket in case of
loss.

Lastly ......cost. As an exmple a Buck Nighthawk is a outstanding
do everytine knife that is a favorite at a small percentage of the Reeve
knife cost with NONE of the negative points to deal with. There are many
other knives of quality that will qualify in place of the Reeve blade.

Have a look around mate your dollars can buy more for less if you're
caerful. Good luck...
 

DBH

Joined
Aug 3, 2001
Messages
1,649
The more thought on this subject, the blade size would definitely be to small. I currently use a Busse SJ, and was looking for apossible different blade style with a little bit more length. I wil definitely have to keep looking. I agree again with not keeping everything in one spot, I have small puch on my belt as well as one in my pack( I like repitition as well). I will definitely have to look further.

Thanks for the feedback.
 
Joined
Jul 22, 2001
Messages
157
Originally posted by Tightwad


Negatives that I see.......

Why would anyone want to keep all of their emergency gear in ONE
spot?? I spread mine over my person. Redunancy again and again.
The claim to fame of the hollow handle is nice ,but let's be realistic
that no thinking woodsman wants all his eggs in one basket in case of
loss.

Why is this a negative? You can store whatever you want in it.

Who says you have to keep all their emergency gear in the knife handle? Someone who likes redundancy might appreciate the benefit of having a few items stored there.
 
Joined
Jul 22, 2001
Messages
1,417
It 's not that EVERYONE keeps it all in the handle at all. If a person DID to
that then it would be a big negative .

I also can't believe that a few folk's have such reading comprehension difficulties.
What was written was clear enough for the majority. Friendly advice based on experiance.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2000
Messages
332
if i've ever got an extra $200.00 lying aroud (yeah, right) i do sort of have my eye on the shadow 3, the 4 inch spearpoint. it would be a really nice size for an edc fixed blade, and the handle would make a dandy match safe. considering the size and construction (watertight), matches are about the only thing i'd keep in there. it's easier and safer to keep your kit in your pockets, or in a pouch on the sheath. besides, if you wrapped the handle in some nylon cordage, you'd have the big 3 covered anyway: knife, fire and cordage. you can find a way to improvise the rest.

for a chopper, look at a khukuri. beats a beaver on speed for gathering wood.

sorry for the lower case.
 
Joined
Oct 31, 2000
Messages
110
I bought a Shadow III last autum. It`s only been outdoors once, but I was very pleased with it. I mainly used it to cut up dry twigs, for making a fire. Have also used it in the kitchen to cut some pork, and to cut the head off a nearly completely frozen salmon.

Now, I`m aware of the drawbacks of a metal handle. At low temperatures, metal is painful to touch barehanded. But to tell the truth, I`ve been a bit lazy about winter outdoors activities, the last couple of years.

Obviously a 4" knife isn`t a chopper, but on the Chris Reeve web page, their price list also lists the Shadow I. The Shadow I has a 9" blade, but it`s not mentioned anywhere else on their webpage.

http://www.chrisreeve.com/price2001.htm

Oh btw. the hollow handle. I keep roughly six feet of thin brass wire in there, together with some of those spark lite tinder tabs, a piece of flint, and a safety pin. LOL

NILS
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2000
Messages
535
In sub zero weather your un-gloved hand will freeze quick enough in contact with just air. Yes if you let a metal knife handle come to air temp and then put bare skin on it, there will be a problem. But alas I wear gloves, and the Reeve's raspy grip really works well with gloves. Many other knives also do not have the tang fully enveloped by the grip material. As for rust, Reeve's one piece line are coated well. So only the edge could possibly rust . Simply drawing the edge across some dry wood will dry it off and burn any water off the edge with friction.. Also putting it back into the sheath tends to re oil it, as there is oil built up wear the sheath contacts the blade. A-2 holds a very nice edge a long time.
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2000
Messages
1,362
I'm a complete Chris Reeve one piece fan, having used a Project II for years.
Good points:
Will take a keen edge; hold it for a considerable time; will not chip out.
Sturdy blade that you can pry with.
Strong point that I haven't been able to break.
Great coating that lasts and lasts. No rust that an oily rag once in a while wouldn't keep at bay.
Outstanding grip that holds as fast as your own grip power, especially if you get a kick back (you don't want to break your wrist). Best when your hands are a little work hardened, but even so works when your hands are numb with cold and covered in slippy grit.
Cross guard/tines just the right size.
Weight just right for both chops and tight control work; that can't be said for bigger heavier blades.
Good back for applying pressure on for chisel cutting and hammering.
Nice flat to the top of the handle for drilling and digging.
The teeth start the cut on those hard nylon ropes.
Nice watertight compartment for putting whatever you like in; some cord and a couple of advanced band aids.
Fantastic sheath with its stud retainer. No excuse for leaving your knife on the ground. Nice and quiet!
If its that cold you would be wearing gloves.

My thoughts are that unless you want to cut a pile of logs or build a log cabin, you don't need more knife. Then you need a machete or an axe.

I've had so many adventures with my PII that I've sent it back for a spruce up. Don't worry I bought a PI to use while its away. I'm also testing a Shaddow III, but this is a little knife and has a slightly different role. Will post my finding in the future.

Projects: best investment in knives I've made. There is nothing yet of this size that I've picked up that could make me change - and I've played with a few.
 
Joined
Jul 22, 2001
Messages
157
Originally posted by Tightwad

I also can't believe that a few folk's have such reading comprehension difficulties.
What was written was clear enough for the majority. Friendly advice based on experiance.

You did call it a negative.

BTW, suggesting I have reading difficulties is not friendly, IMO.
 

DBH

Joined
Aug 3, 2001
Messages
1,649
GreenJacket and everyone else, thank you for your replies. It sounds that a Reeve one piece could do many things for a mid-sized field knife(protection for the hands will be required). If I am looking for a big chopper, something else. Thanks for the replies again.
 

SALTY

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2000
Messages
5,423
I've spent a good bit of time outdoors and have enjoyed the Chris Reeve's One Piece Range while hunting, camping and hiking.

The Busse knives along with hatchets and axes make better choppers, but I like the slicing ability of the Reeves for .250" stock. These are tough knives that take and hold a good edge. They have flawsless execution (if that's important to you) and a company that will stand behind them. There are better knives for specific tasks but the One Piece range are very capable slicers and cutters that can lightly chop and ask for little care in return.

The hollow handle is not capable (IMO) for a full blown survival kit. I have other pouches and pockets for that. However, a couple a band aids, a means of starting a fire and a small compass could come in handy, along with the knife.
 

Danbo

Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 28, 1999
Messages
14,967
I bought a Project II recently, and plan on taking it out on some camping trips in the Spring. You hardcore guys can have the extreme cold weather camping. I had a custom Rowe's leather sheath made for mine that includes pouches for both a stone or Swiss Army Knife, and a small LED flashlight. I agree, the hollow handle wont hold much, but I figure it ought to be big enough to put some Spyderwire fishing line, a few hooks, a couple of small weights, waterproof matches and maybe a $20 bill or so. Nothing that will be needed everyday, but a few things that might come in handy in a pinch.
 

austin37

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2019
Messages
13
I'm a complete Chris Reeve one piece fan, having used a Project II for years.
Good points:
Will take a keen edge; hold it for a considerable time; will not chip out.
Sturdy blade that you can pry with.
Strong point that I haven't been able to break.
Great coating that lasts and lasts. No rust that an oily rag once in a while wouldn't keep at bay.
Outstanding grip that holds as fast as your own grip power, especially if you get a kick back (you don't want to break your wrist). Best when your hands are a little work hardened, but even so works when your hands are numb with cold and covered in slippy grit.
Cross guard/tines just the right size.
Weight just right for both chops and tight control work; that can't be said for bigger heavier blades.
Good back for applying pressure on for chisel cutting and hammering.
Nice flat to the top of the handle for drilling and digging.
The teeth start the cut on those hard nylon ropes.
Nice watertight compartment for putting whatever you like in; some cord and a couple of advanced band aids.
Fantastic sheath with its stud retainer. No excuse for leaving your knife on the ground. Nice and quiet!
If its that cold you would be wearing gloves.

My thoughts are that unless you want to cut a pile of logs or build a log cabin, you don't need more knife. Then you need a machete or an axe.

I've had so many adventures with my PII that I've sent it back for a spruce up. Don't worry I bought a PI to use while its away. I'm also testing a Shaddow III, but this is a little knife and has a slightly different role. Will post my finding in the future.

Projects: best investment in knives I've made. There is nothing yet of this size that I've picked up that could make me change - and I've played with a few.
Just read this thread, are you still using them these days ? How did your review of the shadow III go?
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2000
Messages
1,362
Wow that was a long time ago!
I retired my Project when I left the military. Had it factory reconditioned. Its just fine, and a nostalgia trip every time I handle it. The Shadow and a friend who has another are still doing sterling work. Between them they must have gralloched 100 deer.

Now I do more bushcraft and have a Survive Knives GSO 5.1, Terava 110/120s, and Skrama.

I retired my Blackjack and Al Mars folders to light duties too. Still use my Sebbies though. My most hard worked knife is a Boye folder with the Whale, though the blade has had 1/3rd sharpened away.
Metalurgy has moved on, and a few modern designs have seen improvements, though some designs aren't that good either.
A really well made and designed knife can last a lifetime. Takes quite something to get me excited now.

I quite fancy another sheath/combat knife again; just for the fun of it. No one does quite the same slim but long profile of the Project. Thats what I know works. Had a CR Pacific and what a lovely design, but it just wasn't the same, too utilitarian and the teeth were just in the wrong place/not needed.
The modern military need Leathermans, and maybe a Spyderco.

Ten years ago I taught myself No Spin Throwing. There are loads of tutorials now. Best design are the Tom Tom Arrows.
 

austin37

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2019
Messages
13
Very cool to hear how times have changed and your interest in the use of the knives. I’ve been lookin for another user one piece Chris reeve, one with the spear point and around 4-5.5 inches. I’ve got a Randall pro thrower for my throwing knives, gonna have to look up Tom Tom
 
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