Coffee

commandertekki

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Oct 24, 2013
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img_4016-jpeg.1498023

thought I would share in this thread too
 

sbh06

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Dec 5, 2015
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I couldn't let this slip to page 2...oh the horrors of that...:eek: I brewed some Shellback Espresso from Fire Dept Coffee today. Also, Iron Bean's Unicorn is Salted Caramel Mocha right now. Had some over the weekend and it is awesome. Have a great week everyone.

wNaxSvz.jpg
 

dannyp

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I couldn't let this slip to page 2...oh the horrors of that...:eek:

Page 2 of Community Center?!o_O We've been seriously slacking here. I just roasted a fresh batch of Nicaraguan last night myself. Nice knife combo there and the marbled mug is pretty cool too.
 

sbh06

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Page 2 of Community Center?!o_O We've been seriously slacking here. I just roasted a fresh batch of Nicaraguan last night myself. Nice knife combo there and the marbled mug is pretty cool too.
That sounds delicious...Eventually I may try my hand at roasting, but for now I am content to drink amazing coffee from those that excel in doing it.

The mini Ritter doesn't get the attention it deserves but every time I carry it I'm reminded how much I like it. The Mustang is a recent arrival and near the top of my traditional list already.
 

The Amazing Virginian

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Working my way through a couple of pounds of El Mirador Gesha from Columbia. I've had Gesha which was out of this world - best I ever drank - and Gesha which was only just very good. This is the latter. FWIW, I make my coffee using an Aeropress and a newly acquired Technivorm Moccamaster.

Now I have a question for which I would be curious to see the opinions of folks here.

How much in volume is a cup of coffee to YOU? Seems to vary all over the place. In standard units, a cup of anything is 8 ounces. I like to cook, and in cooking, a cup of anything is always 8 ounces.

But in my experience, when coffee gizmo manufacturers in particular mention "a cup of coffee" it seems to me that they rarely mean 8 ounces. Seems like 4 ounces or 6 ounces is more common, and I'm not sure why. I'm not sure if I've ever made or poured a "regular" cup of "American" coffee that was only 4 ounces. Usually 6 or 8 or even 10 ounces. If it's a mug, it might be 12 ounces. At Starbucks, a "tall" (which is small) is 12 ounces, and a grande (which is medium) is 16 ounces. Where are all these manufacturers coming up with these 4 ounce cups of coffee?

So do you drink coffee in 4 ounce batches? For me, it's almost always 8 ounces, although sometimes it could be 6 ounces. When you think about a cup of coffee . . . how big is it to you?

TIA.
 
Last edited:

dannyp

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Nov 25, 2007
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Working my way through a couple of pounds of El Mirador Gesha from Columbia. I've had Gesha which was out of this world - best I ever drank - and Gesha which was only just very good. This is the latter. FWIW, I make my coffee using an Aeropress and a newly acquired Technivorm Moccamaster.

Now I have a question for which I would be curious to see the opinions of folks here.

How much in volume is a cup of coffee to YOU? Seems to vary all over the place. In standard units, a cup of anything is 8 ounces. I like to cook, and in cooking, a cup of anything is always 8 ounces.

But in my experience, when coffee gizmo manufacturers in particular mention "a cup of coffee" it seems to me that they rarely mean 8 ounces. Seems like 4 ounces or 6 ounces is more common, and I'm not sure why. I'm not sure if I've ever made or poured a "regular" cup of "American" coffee that was only 4 ounces. Usually 6 or 8 or even 10 ounces. If it's a mug, it might be 12 ounces. At Starbucks, a "tall" (which is small) is 12 ounces, and a grande (which is medium) is 16 ounces. Where are all these manufacturers coming up with these 4 ounce cups of coffee?

So do you drink coffee in 4 ounce batches? For me, it's almost always 8 ounces, although sometimes it could be 6 ounces. When you think about a cup of coffee . . . how big is it to you?

TIA.

I never really measured it, but always thought it was about 6-8 oz per cup for what coffee makers were listed as. I think most normal mugs are about 10 oz, large mugs are 16 oz, and a lot of travel tumblers are 20 oz. If there is some kind of official standard for it, SpyderPhreak would probably know.

When I drink a cup of coffee, it's usually in the 16 oz range because that's what my Clever Dripper holds and most of the mugs I use are that size or larger.

As far as the 4 oz measurement, the only thing I can think of is because of the small teacups I've commonly seen on old china sets and the measurement just carried over. That's just a flat out guess though.
 

Dcdavis

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Oct 13, 2018
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Working my way through a couple of pounds of El Mirador Gesha from Columbia. I've had Gesha which was out of this world - best I ever drank - and Gesha which was only just very good. This is the latter. FWIW, I make my coffee using an Aeropress and a newly acquired Technivorm Moccamaster.

Now I have a question for which I would be curious to see the opinions of folks here.

How much in volume is a cup of coffee to YOU? Seems to vary all over the place. In standard units, a cup of anything is 8 ounces. I like to cook, and in cooking, a cup of anything is always 8 ounces.

But in my experience, when coffee gizmo manufacturers in particular mention "a cup of coffee" it seems to me that they rarely mean 8 ounces. Seems like 4 ounces or 6 ounces is more common, and I'm not sure why. I'm not sure if I've ever made or poured a "regular" cup of "American" coffee that was only 4 ounces. Usually 6 or 8 or even 10 ounces. If it's a mug, it might be 12 ounces. At Starbucks, a "tall" (which is small) is 12 ounces, and a grande (which is medium) is 16 ounces. Where are all these manufacturers coming up with these 4 ounce cups of coffee?

So do you drink coffee in 4 ounce batches? For me, it's almost always 8 ounces, although sometimes it could be 6 ounces. When you think about a cup of coffee . . . how big is it to you?

TIA.
Just for me, when I’m at home I have a 14oz mug I use. When I’m heading to work or leaving the house and taking coffee with me I take either a 20oz or 32oz tumbler. I use a v60 pour over when I’m leaving the house bc it’ll fill the big tumblers, Aeropress at home. I prefer the v60. If I remember when I used an auto drip maker roughly 6 cups filled my 32oz tumbler
 

The Amazing Virginian

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I never really measured it, but always thought it was about 6-8 oz per cup for what coffee makers were listed as. I think most normal mugs are about 10 oz, large mugs are 16 oz, and a lot of travel tumblers are 20 oz. If there is some kind of official standard for it, SpyderPhreak would probably know.

When I drink a cup of coffee, it's usually in the 16 oz range because that's what my Clever Dripper holds and most of the mugs I use are that size or larger.

As far as the 4 oz measurement, the only thing I can think of is because of the small teacups I've commonly seen on old china sets and the measurement just carried over. That's just a flat out guess though.
Thanks.

FYI, as an example my Moccamaster brews for a 40 oz carafe and calls this "10 cups." So that is 4 ounces per cup. I've seen a lot of others call it the same way . . . a 32 oz carafe is "8 cups", etc. IMO . . . that's a joke. I'm thinking that even those old crappy vending machines that dispensed coffee in those paper cups with poker hands printed on them with the hole card on the bottom gave you more than 4 ounces.
 

Monofletch

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Jan 14, 2010
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Google says .....
4 fluid ounces

A "cup" of coffee in the US is usually 4 fluid ounces (118 ml), brewed using 5 fluid ounces (148 ml) of water. Coffee carafes used with drip coffee makers,
 

The Amazing Virginian

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Your "Kona" coffee . . . probably isn't. Especially if you bought it at Costco, Marshalls, Albertsons, Bed Bath & Beyond, CostPlus/WorldMarket, Safeway, or Kroger.

(March 9, 2021, 7:05 PM EST) -- Costco, Marshalls and Gold Coffee Roasters have reached agreements with Hawaiian coffee farmers to settle out of a proposed class action that accused them of selling ordinary coffee under the name "Kona," including a $6 million payment from Gold.

Under a proposed settlement filed Monday in Washington federal court, Gold Coffee Roasters Inc. would pay the money to more than 600 class members who grow Kona coffee, depending on how much product each sold during the proposed class period. The company also agreed to new labeling that will adhere to Hawaii's "more stringent labeling laws."

Costco Wholesale Corp. and Marshalls of MA Inc. will not pay any money under their proposed settlements, but the retailers agreed to follow new labeling guidelines that will also apply to vendors required to go through a certification process.

The settlements "deliver substantial monetary relief to the settlement class and include injunctive terms that will accomplish one of the primary objectives of this litigation: to bring about changes in the labeling of coffee described as containing coffee from the Kona region, thus preventing further economic harm to the growers of legitimate Kona coffee," the farmers said.

Under the deal with Gold, the farmers would receive attorney fees of no more than 25% of the settlement amount.

The lawsuit was filed in 2019 on behalf of "farmers who grow the entire worldwide supply of authentic Kona coffee," and claimed that only coffee grown in the Kona District of the Big Island of Hawaii can be legally labeled as "Kona."

In addition to Costco, Marshalls and Gold, the suit also targeted Albertsons Cos. Inc., BCC Assets LLC, Bed Bath & Beyond Inc., Cameron's Coffee and Distribution Co., Copper Moon Coffee LLC, CostPlus/WorldMarket, Hawaiian Isles Kona Coffee Ltd. LLC, Java LLC, MNS LLC, Marmaxx Operating Corp., Mulvadi Corp., Pacific Coffee Inc., Safeway Inc., Sprouts Farmers Market Inc. and The Kroger Co.

In February, U.S. District Judge Robert S. Lasnik approved preliminary settlements the farmers reached with Cameron's, Copper Moon, BCC, Pacific and Cost Plus that totaled just over $7 million.

By using the Kona name on other coffee, the farmers claimed the companies violated the Lanham Act and its ban on false designations of origin.

"The term 'Kona' tells consumers their coffee comes from this distinctive geographic region," the farmers said in their suit. "Defendants' deceptive practices have flooded the market with counterfeit 'Kona' coffee products, injuring honest Kona farmers."

Though filed under the federal trademark statute, the Hawaiian farmers don't claim trademark rights to the name. Instead, the lawsuit is more akin to efforts by groups of European food exporters to enforce "appellations of origin" over geographic names like "Champagne."

Under U.S. law, groups of food producers can register a "certification mark" for a protected geographical term and only allow sellers to use it if their product meets certain standards. Idaho potato growers have such a registration, but the coffee farmers who filed the lawsuit do not have that kind of registration.

According to the lawsuit, only 2.7 million pounds of coffee is grown in the Kona region each year, but more than 20 million pounds of coffee is labeled with the name, which hurts the farmers of authentic Kona coffee
 

knarfeng

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Is there any topic on BF that you can comment on without needing to start an argument?
 
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