Collins with chip in blade

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by A Visitor, Jan 13, 2016.

  1. A Visitor

    A Visitor

    387
    Jan 19, 2009
    Should clean up with a file....No?[​IMG]
     
  2. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    The circular file?
     
  3. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Bo T

    Bo T

    Feb 12, 2011
    If you have lots of time, yes.
     
  5. quinton

    quinton

    Nov 4, 2006
    I did what, pegs outlined in less than a day, and used just basic hand tools to do it. That included a new haft made from a stave.
     
  6. Hacked

    Hacked

    947
    Jun 1, 2010
    I'll just add that I would soak it in vinegar for a couple of days so you can see the hardening line before putting in the effort. Otherwise why not. You could also take more from the top and then perhaps get away with taking less off the bit. Either way its a perfect candidate for modifying IMO.
     
  7. rjdankert

    rjdankert

    Mar 10, 2011
    A couple of thoughts FWIW.

    I would also want to do this first
    My other thought is to keep the balance front to back the same as the original.

    [​IMG]

    It probably had a balance front to back at a point roughly at the front of the eye. Take the same amount of material factoring in the chip off both ends. My illustration shows a removal line B on the bottom, but you could take material off of the top or both. You might also reshape the poll to get the balance.

    [​IMG]

    Bob
     
  8. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Yup. I usually hate seeing people chop up old axes because they usually use ones that are totally fine. This one, on the other hand, is a perfect candidate. No collectors value or historical significance, no practical use as-is, so yeah--go to town on that baby and let it rise like a phoenix from the ashes.
     
  9. A Visitor

    A Visitor

    387
    Jan 19, 2009
    Thanks all, Some great advise to a post that I made sarcastically. Another "user" axe would be fine but redundancy on that need was met a long time ago.
    I'm considering making something useful from it that I can enjoy more than another axe among the axes in the workshop. A lamp or coat rack, maybe a shelf like this one.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Bo T

    Bo T

    Feb 12, 2011
    Using my belt grinder, it would still take me a couple of hours to reshape the head and reprofile the cheeks so it would still cut well. It would take me several days if all I had was a file. A good hack saw would help a lot.
     
  11. SC T100

    SC T100

    Apr 2, 2014
    I dunno if that one is worth much effort...even if you re-shape it you might run out of hard steel once it's bevels are brought back. I'd say it's a wall hanger or other interesting use like you mentioned. It just seems like an absolute ton of work for not much in return (unless you simply just want and enjoy the project).
     
  12. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Depends on what tools are at your disposal. With cutoff wheels and a grinder you could get it back in action in no time. At the very least it'd make a good axe for work in conditions likely to beat it up, like chopping roots.
     
  13. SC T100

    SC T100

    Apr 2, 2014
    Very true, too! That's a great point...root chopper at the very least as that doesn't really need a hardened bit. Good call.
     
  14. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    There's probably still going to be at least 1/4" of good steel in it after modding anyhow.
     
  15. SC T100

    SC T100

    Apr 2, 2014
    Yeah, it's definitely possible. I'll echo Hacked and say the vinegar bath is definitely a good idea to see what's there.
     
  16. the possum

    the possum

    Jul 31, 2002
    You also have to keep in mind that the hard steel bit partly wraps around the softer core, so the vinegar bath could make it look like there's still some hard steel on the sides, but the center/edge is soft. I'd try reshaping the edge right in the scallop and then etching, to make sure it was still hard all the way through first.

    Well, actually, I'd just pass on this one and find a better one for 10 bucks somewhere...
     
  17. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Although that's only if it's welded construction. If it's whole steel then it'll be hard in the entire dark region of the etch.
     
  18. chuxwan

    chuxwan

    423
    Aug 26, 2012
    Feasibility of mig welding in a new bit on something like that? I'm thinking of trying it with some 5160 scrap, maybe cutting a puzzle piece negative or some such shape so the new and old have more weld area. Thoughts?
     
  19. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    I'm aware of an Australian collector who has had a number of worn-out axes re-steeled.
     
  20. the possum

    the possum

    Jul 31, 2002
    That's a good point, but with the shallow hardening steels commonly used, they can do the same thing to a lesser extent. The surface/cheeks cool faster than the thick interior, so the center may still be soft a little further down.
     

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