Concept: CRK Multi-Tool...

Professor

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Just something I've been thinking about for a good while...

I love multi-tools, but have always been disappointed by the ones commercially available.

Attached is a HORRIBLE sketch of a concept for a CRK-manufactured multi-tool with user-customizeable tool choices and placement in the handles. Materials and build are akin to the Sebenza, but perhaps with thinner stock where applicable to keep it thin, lightweight, and pocketable.

Whatcha think?

Professor.
 

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  • CRK Multi-Tool Concept.pdf
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Nice.

But considering what Sebenzas go for, it would probably cost $800. :)
 
i think it looks good, but i agree with powernoodle that it would be ":eek:" expensive
 
Nice.

But considering what Sebenzas go for, it would probably cost $800. :)

The price would be way out there.

I like the concept, but think the clip placement wouldn't work out (middle of the tool) and having essentially four lock bars to worry about would also be a hassle to make.
 
Nah, it could be done. :)

I don't think the clip placement would be that much of a problem, considering how many folders are made with a centered clip design. The width could always be tweaked too (it doesn't need to be that wide by design).

Forgot to mention too, it would have nestled stop pins (perhaps a single stop pin on each side shared by the two tools on one end), like on the Mnandi. Also, the length of the lockbars would have to be tweaked to enable lockup of a single tool while the other tool on the same side was folded closed. Thinner ti stock should enable shorter lockbar length (in theory).

Different foldout tools could be offered, then developed and offered as time goes by so that eventually we'll be installing a laser tool that will cut diamonds. Heck, you could even do a firesteel foldout.

If it could be made for around the same price as a Sebenza, I'd buy it! You could even do a stacked, double version with 8 total tools by putting a carbon fiber, credit-card thickness-or-better divider between the two halves. Anything but aluminum!

Come on, y'all, this is a discussion forum, help me tweak it! Maybe we could con-vince CRK to do a limited run and call it the CRK Forum MTK (Multi Tool Knife). If you're not a rich man, which I'm dang sure not, you're already toting some dang nice knives in spite of it. What's one multi-tool that cost around the same price? One multi-tool to rule them all. ;)

Professor.
 
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Costs would be high.

How about a two-bladed sebenza?

One large and ome small blade in the same frame?
 
I am glad I am not the only one wanting a CRK Multi-tool. I posted my thoughts on this a month or so ago in a thread called "CRK Wish List " Maybe one day, we will get our wish ???
 
I don't believe any manufacturer needs to reinvent the wheel in order to make a multi-tool that would represent the next generation.

Two things:

1. Drop forged pliars
2. Customizable blade/tool selection based on a standard, universal frame.
 
User-customizeable, factory replaceable tools (there would still be custom fitting required with the lockbar face and blade tang.

One version/variation could have a half that contained folding pliers and a standoff on the other end, with two folding tools on the other half.

Dig it.

From a manufacturing standpoint, you'd be fitting two lockbar slabs together, though having to deal with the custom fitting of 4 separate lockbar/blade tang ramp interfaces.

Things I personally don't like about existing commercial multi-tools (MT's):

1. Inabililty to (easily) disassemble and clean. Every MT I own currently has a buildup of funky chocolate malted milk-looking gunk in the pivot areas, rendering it funky and clunky to open and close. A few I've been able to break down and clean due to reasonable pivot hardware, but most not. SAK's, as much as I love them, are dang-near meant to be disposable with everyday use, IMHO.

2. Locking mechanisms on both knife blades and tools. Usually any one-hand-opening MT blade has a liner lock. Don't care for them personally. We all know the wear factor with liner/blade tang configurations, and when mass-produced, the margin of error and inevitable long-term blade play tends to increase. Most locking mechs on tools are pretty good, but complicated, involving a lot more parts than a simple lock bar would entail.

3. Stainless handle construction. Some of the aforementioned gunk was the bi-product of sweaty mitts in my case. Not only that, but even the relatively soft, stampable, and very stainless - stainless handles on some of my favorite MT's developed rust inside and out that affected performance both short and long-term. Ti handle slabs would be right on time.

4. Overall rigidity of tools in use. Not much a problem on a lot of locking plier-based MT's, but not so much an attribute of SAK's and slipjointed cousins.

All in all, I just want an MT that's as well-made as my small Sebenza. I think it would be a cry-once affair. Much like Seb's, we'd be passing them down to our kids, like our Craftsman socket sets, crescent wrenches, and the like.

What is it that you don't like about existing manufactured MT's?

Professor.
 
Good luck, but don't get your hopes up. CRK doesn't usually listen to customer input, let alone do a whole new design because a customer thinks it would be a good idea.

I personaly love the idea and I hope they make it but the reality is they probably won't.
 
Costs would be high.

How about a two-bladed sebenza?

One large and ome small blade in the same frame?

I am pondering putting together a 2 blade sebenza, just having trouble finding pivot bushings about 5/8" long. The longest I have seen is 1/2".
If anyone knows where to get longer ones, please PM me and let me know. The diameter is 3/16"
 
Good luck, but don't get your hopes up. CRK doesn't usually listen to customer input, let alone do a whole new design because a customer thinks it would be a good idea.

I personaly love the idea and I hope they make it but the reality is they probably won't.

CRK listens to a lot of customer input, both through personal interaction (written and verbal) and internet. An example of a customer input driven product is the development of the PS, which was recommended by US Special Forces soldiers from the professionalsoldiers.com forum. Chris also has many, many ideas that are literally years in the making. CRK then takes all ideas, considers what ones have the most promise, fit well within the product portfolio strategy, and conform to the ever-growing capabilities and capacity of the CRK shop. The rate of new products introduced out of a small shop is understandably limited, especially when products need to be dropped from the lineup to make room for them. I, for one, have been quite pleased in the new CRK products introduced over the last couple of years.
 
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