coyote songs

Joined
Apr 29, 2007
Messages
562
this isnt too relevant to survival but an outdoors story and one of my favorite things/moments to experience.

me and the boy {8yrs old} hiked a few miles back into the woods and where cooking hot dogs over a fire last night and the coyote chorus started in as soon as the sun went down.couldnt have been more than 75 yards away, probably less.sounded like they where right next to us.

happens all the time.nothing new but something about them boys and their rallying cry to go hunting just makes me feel good.

their is something magical and primitive about it.it raises the hair on my neck in a good way everytime.no fear involved.

and while they are extremely prevalent and their calls can be heard any night i always find it a privilege to be out their with them and share the same dark corner of the woods on the same dark night.

the boy really gets a kick out of howling back at them...lol.

their are a lot of other cool animals in them woods but they just dont speak for all to hear ya know??

i'm sure soon after that rallying/hunting cry something small and furry became dinner.

we often try to share things with our ancestors and get back to nature in many different traditional ways.

what better way than to share a dark night under the stars in the wilderness,huddled around a fire,listening to the sounds of the forest most prevalent predator.

every time,i share something with all man kind from the past.from 100 to 10,000 years ago.

magical.
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2004
Messages
4,812
There are a few things that I enjoy as "ancient" reassurances.

And yes, a coyote in the distance is definitely one of them.

I also think your list could include...

1.The look, sound, and smell of a well-constructed fire.

2. A good storm cloud moving in on the horizon.

3. Snowfall that turns everything clean and white

4. Ocean waves

5. Owl hoots

6. A perfectly clear night sky complete with shooting stars here and there

7. A great multicolor sunset, especially with hills or desert bluffs framing it

These are things within our bones, able to turn any city dweller into a lover of the open sky.
 

Brian Jones

Moderator
Joined
Jan 17, 1999
Messages
7,560
Great post. it's that connection with the past, with nature, and the wild creatures that makes being out there so thrilling...
 

lmalterna

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Messages
3,595
On the other end of the spectrum there is:
Monkey butt
chiggers
40F rain for two straight days
chainsaw snoring
That rock that appears under your pad at 03:00


:) Just kidding, I always consider it an honor to be allowed to pear at wildlife of any shape or size and just enjoying learning about it's activities in survival. As a kid I was bad about finding spots in the woods for naps and grownups being unable to find me! LOL!

2Door
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2007
Messages
562
LOL.

your right.not everything we share with out ancestors is pleasant.

mosquitos and being hungry would be accurate although they dealt with much more than we ever will.

every time i look up at the stars it feels special knowing that i am looking at the same stars ans constellations as my great granfather,the indians and the cavemen.

it is one thing that connects us all and knows no limit traveling through time.

its a changing world but some things stay the same and to see the big picture just go outside tonight and look up.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Messages
129
Nice thread. Coyote music is right up there with hearing the first flock of snow geese in the fall. We get to hear them right here in the burbs and my guess is that they've eaten a few poodles and other fru fru dogs around these parts as Chris suggests. Used to be on a deer lease on a ranch near Beeville, Texas. For some reason that area had more coyotes than anyplace else I've been. At least when the rock under your bedroll or the spider crawling over your face woke you in the night, you'd almost allways get a song for your trouble.
 

Mack

Expert Ultracrepidarian
Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2007
Messages
38,420
The first time you hear an Elk bugle will definitely send shivers through your bones.
One of the best outdoor sounds there is.
 
Joined
Mar 22, 2006
Messages
5,944
I love the sound of coyotes... SOmetimes when camping if it's real quiet I'll try to get em started... I must look like a reltard howling into the night but noone is there anyway...also it does work a good percentage of the time.
 
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
4,832
When I was younger, my dad and uncle would take us kids out in the woods at our farm and leave us there for an hour or so in the dark late at night. Just so we could get used to the sounds of the woods and recognize them and not be scared of them. It was always so cool to sit out there and listen to coyotes and such.
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
831
The interstate is about a mile behind us. All pasture and farmland inbetween. When a siren from an emergency vehicle goes down the road it really gets the coyotes going. One of the neighbors shot off alot of fireworks on July 4th and that also stirred them up. I see one occasionally run between the barn and the neighbors. One thing I do know is that there are no feral cats roaming around the barn . There were dozens a few years ago.
 
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
4,832
What really gets the coyotes going is to hang a chicken from the butcher up in a tree...:D
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2004
Messages
4,812
So will hearing a Cougar somewhere off in the dark.
I've never heard a cougar growl in the wild, but I don't want to. I agree that's an unpleasant thing.

Here's a couple of other unpleasant camping sounds, only to get 'em off my chest.

Picture a perfect night camping... you're all snuggled in, the food's all packed away, everything in the camp is nice and safe... when you hear (pick any one)...

1. Car doors slamming and some drunk guy yelling at his wife

2. Loud laughter and somebody's subwoofer pounding

3. The sound of a stream of water suddenly pouring onto the ground. At least, you hope that's water.

4. The crunchy sound of car tires rolling backward down a hill

5. Tornado sirens

6. The squawk of law enforcement radios and a ticked off voice saying "Yep--it was their fire all right."
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2006
Messages
907
I love the sound of Coyotes, in my rural peice of CT. But I love to watch them die lately from my Barrett after killing 11 Of my Togeys and a few future cornish hen meals! 50 Cal Does a JOB!!!!!
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2006
Messages
7,019
Hey mods, I'm not sure if is ok to post this or not, so if not, please remove. It just seemed relevant to this thread. It was in a local newspaper on Wednesday.
----------------------------
It was about 4 a.m., and I was out on the street, jogging, just me and my heartbeat.

The more I ran, the more my heart turned into a percussion instrument, each thump a nagging reminder of my sorry conditioning program.

Thump, gasp, thump.

Was Chick Webb in there, trying to pound his way out of my rib cage?

With the phantom drummer about to reach a crescendo, I saw it - a set of antlers gliding through the morning air. As I kept running, I saw another set, and another, and another - four in all, each one suspended in the pre-dawn atmosphere.

And then, like a photograph developing in a tray of chemicals, the entire forms took shape, slowly but beautifully, the antlers melding into heads, the heads into bodies, the bodies into legs.

Munching grass on a front lawn, they cocked their heads in my direction, so still and quiet that they looked like lawn ornaments.

They were the most beautiful deer I had ever seen.

Not that I have kept a mental record of every deer I have come across, mind you, and not that these four transcended all the others, but I spotted these four in the most prosaic of settings, my neighbourhood, and the environment accentuated their shimmering grace and beauty.

For someone whose idea of wildlife is a goldfish in a bowl, it was startling, even breathtaking.

How sad.

How sad that I would respond to such a simple sight with such grand pleasure.

How sad that my world has become has become so cloistered, so divorced from the beauty around me, that my only connection to nature is a National Geographic special on television.

How sad that I spend all my free time, except for those heart-thumping daily runs, inside the house, reading or watching the news on the cable networks.

How sad that I have evolved into Indoor Man.

And what is sadder still, I am probably not alone.

That early-morning vision was an epiphany, my version of "stop and smell the roses" - hardly and earth-shattering revelation, perhaps, but one we probably all need.

In his lively and insightful book, In Praise of Slowness: Challenging the Cult of Speed, Carl Honore presents an interesting theory - that the hectic pace of modern life is not only spiritually deadening, which we already knew, but also physically deadening, which is scary.

"To keep pace with the modern world, to get up to speed, many people are looking beyond coffee to more potent stimulants," Honore writes. "Cocaine remains the booseter of choice among white-collar professionals, but amphetamines, otherwise known as 'speed', are catching up fast. Use of the drug in the American workplace has jumped by 70 per cent since 1998."

To some people, instant gratification is not instant enough.

And the faster they go, the faster they have to go.

The world is so accelerated that speed itself - not the destination or the completion of a task - has become the goal.

Back to those deer. I saw them for the first time about 10 months ago, and I have spotted others since then, sometimes as many as seven at a time.

I see them at least once a week, and each time I respond with the same awe I experienced that first morning.

How sad.

But what if I lost that sense of wonder?

How much sadder would that be?

------------------------------

San Antonio Express-News

---------------------------------

Actually, I've never had the problem - ever since I was young, somebody would yell, "Hey, get away from those roses!" :D

Doc
 

Mack

Expert Ultracrepidarian
Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2007
Messages
38,420
Great post Doc, thanks.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
Messages
154
A long time ago, when my dad was in this rehab place in the pine barrens, we would stay their late... and one night, from across the lake, we all stood in the dark parking lot and listened to the coyotes howl.
I was pretty freaked out at first, but I realized how beautiful nature is.

Also, my cousins lives near train tracks and has a big view of them from his window.
Well, one night, when the snow covered the ground we looked out, to see a lare red fox trotting across the tracks in the bright moodlight.
it was pretty cool.
:D
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2007
Messages
562
they dont say "sly as a fox" for no reason.they dont screw around.very shy animals that dont like to be seen.

an elk bugle is something i would love to hear.i'm just in the wrong corner of the country.

a mountain lion in the distance isnt something i want to hear and am always glad to know they dont live where i do when i'm sleeping on the forest floor.

emf,

i visited one or two rehab places myself and they are always full of wild life.deers running in circles in the parking lot,groundhogs in living in the front lawn,crack heads running around the..........
 
Top