CPKitchen

BIGDORK

Gold Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
761
Just here to echo some of the statements already made:
Something thin, tall and around 10" long. Ergonomic handles made of material that will repel veggie, meat and fruit juices.

Another fan of Japanese kitchen knives here. I have several Gyutos and Santokus.

I prefer the shallower curves of Gyutos vs the more pronounced belly on Western Chefs knives, but this will depend on preferred cutting technique. I don't really 'rock' the blade when cutting. I either chop or slice.

I tend to prefer Gyutos with a more pronounced downward curve on the top of the blade near the tip. This has a direct influence on the relative angle of the edge in relation to the handle.
If we're talking Gyuto/Chef knife I would favor something around 240+mm long, around 3-ish mm thick, at least 52 mm tall but with good finger clearance.
For a petty or Santoku no input but I'll buy it

This will probably generate some hate speech but, a CPKleaver in D3V sounds pretty badass.
Admittedly I rarely use one but like most of my big blades, I would make up a reason to whip it out
 

bluemax_1

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2014
Messages
1,875
Just here to echo some of the statements already made:





If we're talking Gyuto/Chef knife I would favor something around 240+mm long, around 3-ish mm thick, at least 52 mm tall but with good finger clearance.
For a petty or Santoku no input but I'll buy it

This will probably generate some hate speech but, a CPKleaver in D3V sounds pretty badass.
Admittedly I rarely use one but like most of my big blades, I would make up a reason to whip it out
Yeah, a cleaver in D3V definitely sounds good. When chopping through bones or hard skinned vegetables like some squash/gourds, the properties of D3V sound ideal.

I'm hoping Nathan's tests on Magnacut bear out. On paper, it sounds like a Gyuto in Magnacut at ~63Hrc would be awesome.
 

Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
21,438
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SpyderPhreak

Rocketman for hire
Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Messages
14,792
Very nice! 🔥 Steel? Fruit?

Up until somewhat recently, my kitchen knives consisted of the now battered set I received at my wedding and the plethora of fixed blades and pocket knives I have at my disposal. I favored the latter two options over the former.

However, I recently took the opportunity to have a trio made (actually, I bought one and then ordered the other two to match). The set consists of a Gyuto, a Santoku, and a petty knife. Up until now, I had never given this handle design any thought or consideration, it always appeared uncomfortable. However, after experiencing it in hand, I have to say that I am a fan. I don't usually like my hands to be locked into any sort of grip and the long handles and octagonal shape provide me with a lot of versatility without sacrificing any security.

Also, my wife is a huge fan and that is a big plus.

After hearing Nathan's thoughts on a good steel for a kitchen knife, I kind of regret my steel choice on these but they are ground very thin and maintain a great edge for a good amount of time - I just have to strop them now and then. Tasmanian Blackwood, with African Blackwood bolsters and CPM-20cv steel.

I favor the Santoku and the petty knife - between the two of those, I can process a lot of meat and veggies in a short amount of time. I like the height of the Santoku, it just glides through everything and it definitely suits my style of food prep. I might be able to more scientifically dissect my thoughts after reading some other opinions here but for now, this will do, I guess.

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I didn't mention it before; if you ever want to unload those beautiful blades, hit me up. ;) :thumbsup:
 
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Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
21,438
Very nice! 🔥 Steel? Fruit?


I didn't mention it before; if you ever want to unload those beautiful blades, hit me up. ;) :thumbsup:
thanks folks!
steel- A2
fruit- plums

this knife will spend a couple weeks in our kitchen, and then it's off to a renowned local chef for a week or two for some professional feedback. Then off to CPKHQ for the nod or shake
 

SpyderPhreak

Rocketman for hire
Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Messages
14,792
thanks folks!
steel- A2
fruit- plums

this knife will spend a couple weeks in our kitchen, and then it's off to a renowned local chef for a week or two for some professional feedback. Then off to CPKHQ for the nod or shake
I couldn't tell if they were plums, plots, or maybe large kumquats... colorful!!! 🥳
 

Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
21,438
Any particular reason for the hump on the blade near the handle? Not sure how it would feel if you use a pinching grip with one or two fingers when you cut.
it's actually there to help out a little bit in that grip- you can put your thumb on it in your standard grip for leverage like when slicing through a squash or whatever, but it's more of a little ramp for pulling or pushing the blade with a little more control. Kind of hard to explain, but when your middle finger is resting in the choil, the first knuckle joint of the forefinger can snag the front of the hump while the tip of the thumb can ride slightly higher due to the additional real estate and provide a little more clearance for the stuff you're cutting.

it's mostly theoretical, although I have been testing and using that feature and after a couple small mods I think it will work as intended. I need to soften the spine where it meets the scales.
But that's why I want to put this knife in the hands of a professional, I'm new to this culinary knife thing.
 
Joined
May 1, 2010
Messages
1,950
it's actually there to help out a little bit in that grip- you can put your thumb on it in your standard grip for leverage like when slicing through a squash or whatever, but it's more of a little ramp for pulling or pushing the blade with a little more control. Kind of hard to explain, but when your middle finger is resting in the choil, the first knuckle joint of the forefinger can snag the front of the hump while the tip of the thumb can ride slightly higher due to the additional real estate and provide a little more clearance for the stuff you're cutting.
That makes sense.

it's mostly theoretical, although I have been testing and using that feature and after a couple small mods I think it will work as intended. I need to soften the spine where it meets the scales.
The only other thing I would change would be the handle angle. I'm not sure if it's the angle of the picture, but the rear of the handle seems to slope slightly downward. That would make a rocking motion more difficult.

A little late now, but these are two of my favorite kitchen knives. Shun Taiyo (SG2) on top and the Takeshi Saji Bunka (R-2) on the bottom.
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But that's why I want to put this knife in the hands of a professional, I'm new to this culinary knife thing.
If you're looking for a home cook that does a lot of prep and chopping for a big family, I volunteer as tribute!
 
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