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D2 drop point Hunter/Skinner, Nathan's early work.

JustinFournier

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May 7, 2012
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I'd like to share an example of one of Nathan's older knives. This one is a basic drop point hunter/skinner in D2. Cocobolo handles on G10 liners . It also has a hand made leather sheath, made by Nathan. It was made back in early 2009.

To give you an idea of the size of this thing, the blade is 3 5/8", hollow ground, 7 3/8 OAL.

Here is what Nathan had to say:

"D2 with cold treatment and tempered to HRC 62. This is the perfect steel for this kind of knife (IMO) and this is a high quality HT that has been proven to perform. 304 stainless pins. This has a high thin hollow grind taken to .018" at the edge, which is relatively thin, so it is not for rough use, but it cuts very well and will still withstand some abuse."

People told me, more pics less talk. So I will do there here. I'll post some pics here, then share my thoughts on it afterward.


Here she is in the direct sun. Beautiful satin finish on the hollow grind. The wood looks better here as well. Closer to it's actual appearance with the reds and contrast in the grain.

As always, love Nathan's mark.

Look at the grain in the steel...

Nathan honed the edge on oil stones, it's sharp, really well done. Belly out on the end. Love it.

The knife is beautiful. It has a wonder light feel about it, with enough swell in the handle, and just enough length it just barely fill 4 fingers. It feels exceptionally well balanced, almost like an extension of your hand. It's almost effortless to move it.

Again, Nathan's talent to design a tool for a specific purpose and execute a production version of that design really shines through here. To me, this is a timeless work of quality craftsmanship. It doesn't have anything extraordinary about it in specific, like unobtainum pins, but the sum of the parts creates a heirloom quality tool that is an honor to own. This knife highlights Nathan's exceptional ability to machine a tool that functions extraordinarily well at it's intended task, and looks amazing while doing it.

Here it is with Nathan's sheath. I believe it was made by Jo. Let's call it, charming and rustic.

Thanks for your time, I hope you enjoy.

Edit:

Found some of the missing pics.
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Casinostocks

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First of all, this knife series is simply gorgeous to look at. Oh my what lines with that hollow grind D2 sandwiched in between two slabs of cocobolo. I wonder if Nathan has some Italian DNA because his penchant and talent for knife making artistry is simply exquisite and superb. However unlike so many Italian made knifes, Nathan's knives actually retain their edge like forever and cut, cut, cut, cut, cut and cut with supreme efficiency!

Second of all, I think that there ought to be a Carrothers museum of knives and I would like to bring about a motion to nominate Justin Fournier as its curator. I am even prepared to volunteer as Justin's agen here in the U.S. and receive all knives enroute to him via me (as a hub) to ensure that they are properly packaged and catalogued! That's just me folks! I'm a giver and I'll give till it hurts :D

Lastly and joking aside, Justin please keep these threads coming :thumbup:
 

betzner

CenCal Coast
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That's a good looking knife, and that cocobolo is a simple, beautiful piece of wood. Actually, a wonderful package.
 
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JustinFournier

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Thanks all.

Casino & Bob, I agree!

mobilerd, I can't answer that. I am not sure how many were made, but not many, and not for several years. I know if one came on the market right now, I wouldn't expect it to last long, and speaking for myself I would be willing to pay substantially more than the original price. I highly doubt I am alone there.
 

woodysone

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Nov 21, 2005
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Justin, it looks like a very thought out knife and very much a Carothers. Amazing that it was machined, Nathan is truly an artist. Kind of a shame he is so popular, it's so hard to get one of his current models.
 

JustinFournier

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Thanks woodysone. Don't worry about the availability. I will help you out anytime. Think about the bonuses of his popularity, like the additional resources he will be able to put into knives, the additional designs and patterns we will see and and how many more people will be able to get his work! It's a win win!
 
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Thanks for sharing a piece of history. A very nice simple, refined little knife. With Nathan's evolution as a knife maker, it pwould be interesting to see what a next generation dedicated hunter would look like - and what materials he would use.
 

JustinFournier

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Thanks for sharing a piece of history. A very nice simple, refined little knife. With Nathan's evolution as a knife maker, it pwould be interesting to see what a next generation dedicated hunter would look like - and what materials he would use.

You're welcome. I for one would love to see an updated version of this.
 

Dawkind

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That was the first knife I ever got from Jo and Nathan....one of the sharpest knives I own or have handled.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Casinostocks

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That was the first knife I ever got from Jo and Nathan....one of the sharpest knives I own or have handled.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

When I went to research some of Nathan's earlier work and earlier sales threads, I got a nice chuckle out of some of his offerings lasting a whole 5 minutes or so back in those days!
 

betzner

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If I ever was lucky enough to have one of those skinners, I would hope to have it in some kind of wood. One helluva great looking knife when dressed out with timber.
 

JustinFournier

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That blade is begging for a trip to deer camp. It would make a heck of a nice field-dressing blade I've no doubt.

Amen. I have never used anything quite like it myself. Anything I've used was either longer and wider or skeletonized and wide with a big deep belly, but nothing almost like a paring knife. It's really awesome.
 

Hard Knocks

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......and wide with a big deep belly.......

I wish there was more of a distinction in the knife world regarding 'skinning' blades and 'field-dressing' blades. The above example from Nathan is close to what I prefer for a field-dressing blade which is better for piercing than the deep-bellied blades that seem to me better suited for skinning once the animal is hung and the initial cuts are finished.
 

JustinFournier

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I wish there was more of a distinction in the knife world regarding 'skinning' blades and 'field-dressing' blades. The above example from Nathan is close to what I prefer for a field-dressing blade which is better for piercing than the deep-bellied blades that seem to me better suited for skinning once the animal is hung and the initial cuts are finished.

One pair that I have is one of each. Skeletonized for hygene, but holy uncomfortable. Particularly on anything big that takes a while like a 900lbs moose.

I think geographical location matters too, the size of the deer or game changes and the knives kinda should match. I mean, in some places I see they use ATVs to do the skinning, instead of knives.
 

Hard Knocks

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Yep, I've done it with a truck and tree before. I do not prefer to do it that way because it is so easy to dirty the meat with a mistake or miscommunication. If you're in the snow it's harder to mess up, but still you can end up with more hair on it that way than hanging, or at least I do :D

Field dressing and skinning game is a field I've got a bunch of experience in, large or small. Much more so than bushcraft use of a knife, so that influences my desires greatly as to blade features. Absolutely the size of the game is a factor in blade selection, at least for me. Nathan's field knife size is about the perfect size in my mind for elk-sized critters, maybe a little bigger than I would normally use for deer, but hopefully it will get some use in that department this fall, too.
 
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