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Does this liner LOCKUP look any good ?

Joined
Jul 14, 1999
Messages
352
I recieved my M2 Stryker today and i was just wondering whether or not you think the liner travels too far over to the right (past center). I enclosed a picture (sorry its a bit dark). I gave it the spine whack test and everything was fine and it seems very strong. What do you think ?

m2lock.jpg




[This message has been edited by Llamedos (edited 23 August 1999).]
 
I believe there are some people that may think this is an ok lock up.I personally like them to be a little more to the left especially when brand new.I just feel that you can get longer life out of it,but I guess if it does'nt fail then it's a good lock up.
scott w
 
Not good for that knife.
frown.gif
With those titanium liners you will be lucky if it is usable in a year.My Stryker locked up more to the left than that when new,only a little after a year old it now is buried against the right side liner when opened.I can say this for it though,It still passes the whack test with flying colors.
smile.gif
Hope you have better luck!

Later,

Bobby
 
i have a Jot Sing Khalsa and i had the opposite problem - the liner just moved a little over to the right, just clearing the blade. but now, after months of using and flicking it it seems to move more to the center. unlike my Apache from CRKT, it just catches to the blade, but after lots of flicking it still hasn't moved over towards the center much. oh, well.
 
i have a Jot Sing Khalsa and i had the opposite problem - the liner just moved a little over to the right, just clearing the blade. but now, after months of using and flicking it it seems to move more to the center. unlike my Apache from CRKT, it just catches to the blade, but after lots of flicking it still hasn't moved over towards the center much. oh, well, sometimes you're the bug and sometimes you're the windshield.
 
Most of these production liner locks are like Bic lighters: Disposable. If the liner doesn't start its life on the far left, it will be worn out that much sooner. I'd guess that the knife in the photo will take about a year of normal use until it's ready for the scrap heap. To me, it makes more sense to buy one high quality knife then to keep replacing these disposable factory knives.
 
Can someone please explain why the knife is unuseable when the liner reaches the far right side. Why does this make the lockup weaker ? Any information greatly appreciated.

JD
 
Looks just like the lockup on mine, maybe a little better. The fact of the matter is, it is damn solid. I have a lot of confidence in mine, as it has passed all the lock tests with flying colors. I have no worries or complaints. If in a matter of months or years, the lock travels over to the side and develops some play, I will send it back to Benchmade for repair on warranty. Until a problem actually develops, I am perfectly satisfied.

When a liner lock actually works, that is about the best you can hope for.

Harv
 
I'd like to offer my humble opinion on this subject. For starters, let's assume the average knife blade is 1/8-inch thick (wide). In thousandths, that comes to .125-inch (one hundred twenty-five one-thousandths of an inch). The average liner spring is .060-inch. some makers state the rear edge of the blade should be beveled about 10 degrees, so when the liner spring swings in its arc, the face of the spring is at the same angle as the rear of the blade. Now, upon opening, as soon as the side of the blade moves away from the liner spring, the spring, under pressure, will pop over behind the blade, locking it in the open position. I feel the spring, all .060-inch of it, should be fully behind the rear of the blade for a complete lockup. Then, as the spring and/or rear of the blade wears with use, the spring will continue to move to the right (looking down on top of the upside down knife) until it contacts the other liner. This means the spring can move a maximum of .065-inch, before it stops, or slightly more than twice its thickness.

Yet, I've seen dozens of custom and factory liner locks where the spring engages no more than .015- to .030-inch of the blade upon opening. I feel this is bad news, because .015-inch is almost paper thin. If the face of the spring and rear of the blade are at the exact same angle, and their faces are sharp, they seem to work, because when the blade is being used, cutting pressure is pushing up on the blade, not down, so it can't close accidently. Anyway, something to think about.
 
Benchmade has started to grind the lock surface on the back of the blade slightly concave so the liner goes farther toward the edge before stopping.I noticed that both of my Spyderco Starmates have this concave surface on the back of the blades as well as my Stryker and my Mini AFCK M2. All are locking up better than any of my other knives and the Titanium liners do not stick as bad as in the earlier styles.
 
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