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Dumb question on paracord bracelet

Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
4,741
Hi

I'm an idiot. Right, so now you don't have to tell me and can answer my question ;)

Seriously, it's probably really evident when you see it... anyway.

Got that link to a tutorial:

When you need some cord, how do you take it?

Pics would help, I'm more visual, thanks.
 
First, you are NOT an idiot..
This is a sensible question.

The problem with the "Survival" Braclet, is in the fact that you must un-weave it to use it. The braclet takes a while to weave.. Which means it will take you a bit of time to UN-weave! If you need it in a hurry, this could be a problem..

A would suggest just carry a hank of 550 in your pocket. or in a snack sized ziplock..
 
First, you are NOT an idiot..
This is a sensible question.

The problem with the "Survival" Braclet, is in the fact that you must un-weave it to use it. The braclet takes a while to weave.. Which means it will take you a bit of time to UN-weave! If you need it in a hurry, this could be a problem..

A would suggest just carry a hank of 550 in your pocket. or in a snack sized ziplock..

Snack sized ziplock? Good idea! Never thought of that!:thumbup:
 
My plan was to make one, maybe a little longer, keep it in my bag, and take the lenght I need when I need it. Seems like it's not the perfect "space saver" solution after all.

What I was looking for is a wrapping mode that allows you to gradually undo it. You know, like when you were pulling a string from those old wool sweathers.
 
First, you are NOT an idiot..
This is a sensible question.

The problem with the "Survival" Braclet, is in the fact that you must un-weave it to use it. The braclet takes a while to weave.. Which means it will take you a bit of time to UN-weave! If you need it in a hurry, this could be a problem..

A would suggest just carry a hank of 550 in your pocket. or in a snack sized ziplock..

I totally agree with this. Whether it be time or effort, I've noticed that tying paracord into weaves or wrapping them around sheaths or into bundles simply makes the paracord less usable -- almost as if a simple task just isn't worth destroying the arrangement. If paracord is just stuffed into a bag, it is very easy to choose to use the cord for whatever menial task you wish; suddenly, since it gets used, the paracord is worth carrying. :thumbup:
 
I have to agree With Rescue Mike.

A good daisy chain can store easily, i have used them to hang rope and webbing from packs and they untie in an instant and can be easily retied in the feild.
 
But what is the advantage of a daisy chain above the "cord in a bag" solution? Does it saves space?
 
weave a daisy chain tight and yes it does save space, also it is a quick and tangle free way to store smaller diamater cord.

on a side note, I can not find any of the small plastic buckles to use with the para cord bracelets. Can any one help me out with that?

thanks
 
But what is the advantage of a daisy chain above the "cord in a bag" solution? Does it saves space?

In construction work, this is referred to as a "Mexican knot", and some contractors use it as a way to store large diameter power cords without them tangling. The one other advantage is that by pulling on the loose end, the cord can be extended to the length needed without unraveling the entire cord. I don't use this method for several reasons. First, the cords take a "set", and it is hard to get them to straighten to their full length again. Second, they take up twice as much room in storage this way and third, it is somewhat time consuming to reweave them after each use. Also, bending the cords in such a tight radius leads to wire fatigue and shortens the usable life of the cords. I use either a round reel or a flat reel. They take up much less space in storage and are less prone to damage.

Look at how boot string manufacturers wrap and package their products for sales. They naturally want to make them into the most compact arrangement that is easily unwound by the consumer. This is how I store my paracord. Flat loops wrapped around the hand, then radially wrapped with the rest of the cord once a substantial enough core in formed. When I store ropes and electrical cords without a reel, I use the same method. Least space, easily wrapped and extended.

Codger
 
I have to agree With Rescue Mike.

A good daisy chain can store easily, i have used them to hang rope and webbing from packs and they untie in an instant and can be easily retied in the feild.

I learned it as a climbers "knot" and it is the most useful way to store rope and cord that I have found. I use it on my rope, tubular webbing and paracord.

KR
 
IMHO, things like the paracord bracelet are as much for the geek fun factor as anything else-- Rambo chic :) It wouldn't hurt anything, but having a more accessible bight of line works for me. My daughter likes beading and macrame and I'm going to get her some paracord and turn her loose with that web page. One thing to keep in mind with hiking gear is to have gear with as many uses as possible. With that im mind, you could make all your zipper pulls with small diamter line and each would be a little bt of backup gear. Same with fobs for knives, compass, keys, etc. A couple feet of line, an Exacto blade and a straight stick could turn you into the Great Frog Hunter-- or replace a boot lace.

Coiling the line and wrapping the coil is what I usually do. I've never seen a diagram for making a daisy chain before and I'm going to try that-- always wanted to. It is a given that I will spend at least half the time on a project untangling the line!

Here's a great online resource for knots and an animated lesson on coiling line: Animatedknots.com
 
One thing I was taught early on in regards to survival was...nylon around your neck can be a garote. Around your wrist it can hang you up at the most inoportune moments. Our sporting dogs are sometimes run collarless for this reason. As bad as I hate velcro (rrrriiiippp!), I wear a velcroed nylon band on my watch. A lot of my work involves diving, and climbing in and out of pool structures, and I once had a stout stainless watchband leave me hanging by a wrist when it caught on a structural member. Perhaps you can depend on the lightweight fastex type buckle to break away in a hangup. But I'd be careful of an endless braid.

Codger
 
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