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Edge Pro Apex vs. Professional

Discussion in 'Knife Reviews & Testing' started by Ryan Meyering, Jun 16, 2001.

  1. Ryan Meyering

    Ryan Meyering

    534
    May 4, 1999
    This has been discussed a couple of times here that I'm aware of, but last I heard there wansn't anyone who had experience with both the Apex and Professional Edge Pro models. I had a Pro model a couple of years ago that I had to sell, and I recently picked up a slightly used Apex with the stone upgrade kit on the for sale forum, so I thought I'd give my impressions.

    The Professional model is definitely sturdier than the Apex. The base also locks down much tighter than the Apex's suction cups, which provides two advantages in terms of speed of sharpening. First, you can really bear down on the knife with a lot of pressure without moving the sharpener at all, which is good for quickly repairing damaged edges. This is a good thing for me, as I damage a lot of edges. [​IMG]

    Second, since the sharpener doesn't wiggle around at all, it's easier to slide the knife along in one motion while sharpening. When I tried to do this with the Apex, the sharpener would slide to the side a bit while I was moving the knife. No big deal, I just had to go a bit slower than with the Pro model.

    One other small advantage to the Pro is that changing the stones is a little bit faster and easier. But I do mean a little bit, it's really not a big deal.

    As far as advantages, that's really it. Like Ben Dale says, the Apex can do anything the Pro can do, but the Pro is faster. I didn't really understand why the Pro would be faster, but after using them both I do.

    So which would I buy? The Pro model is $135 more than the Apex plus stone upgrade, which will give you all the stones the Pro model comes with. If I were buying new, I think I'd spring for the Professional model. It's really a pleasure to use. But seeing as how I got a great deal on my used Apex, I'm glad that's what I got.

    http://business.gorge.net/edgepro/

    Ryan

    ------------------
    For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.

    Romans 6:23
     
  2. cntrline

    cntrline

    37
    Nov 18, 2000
    The other advantage of the Pro is that it will take the scissors attachment, the Apex will not. Not a consideration for most, I guess, but worth having.
     
  3. Sid Post

    Sid Post

    Oct 14, 1998
    At this pricepoint, wouldn't you want to step up to a belt grinder? This is the point I am at now.

    Jerry Hossum turned me on to this and, it sure seems like a good option. Belts aren't terribly expensive and, touching up big blades should be much easier. With a little practice, I ought to be able to work on folders too.

    Stay Sharp,
    Sid
     
  4. Ryan Meyering

    Ryan Meyering

    534
    May 4, 1999
    I have a belt grinder; a Coote grinder with 2 HP motor, I'm sort of an aspiring knifemaker, though I haven't had much time lately to put into it. One of the reasons I wanted an Edge Pro was to put an edge on a couple of knives I'm almost done with.

    Have you ever tried to put an edge on a knife with a belt grinder? I did, with a relatively cheap kitchen knife, and ruined the knife. I just couldn't get the edge right. I'm sure Jerry Hossom has the skill to do it well, but it will be a long time before I try to put an edge on a knife with a grinder again.

    Ryan



    ------------------
    For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.

    Romans 6:23
     
  5. Crayola

    Crayola

    Sep 23, 1999
    I finished knife #4 for my sister's boyfriend last fall and i needed to ship it out to him ASAP. I hadn't sharpened the knfie yet, and I was petrified of using my sander. After spending WAY too long on my stones, AND scratching the blade (GRRRRRRRRR) I went to my grinder , put on a convex edge, and I've been hooked ever since. Belt sander and a buffer is THE way to go, in my opinion now. Sure it takes a bit of getting used to, but the time invested in learning is well worth it. The savings in kit is worth is as well! Why buy extra sharpening gear when your belt saner will put an edge on the very knife you ground.

    I don't have time right now to give much advice on using a belt sander, but I offer this:

    1) After each pass, dunk the blade. Edges get HOT QUICK!!

    2) You have to go fast. Edges get hot quick!

    3) You don't need much pressure when sharpenign an edge

    4) Sharpen edge down (you grind a knife edge up)

    5) Put on bevels usign the platen, and then slack belt the edge. You get nice even convex bevels that can circumsize a gnat!

    6) BE VERY CAREFUL WITH A BUFFER!!! DANGEROUS STUFF A BUFFER IS!!

    ------------------
    "Come What May..."
     
  6. R.W.Clark

    R.W.Clark

    Apr 30, 2001
    I have always sharpened edge up. Have never cut a belt in over ten years.

    ------------------
    R.W.Clark

    Proud Member : California Knifemakers Association
     
  7. Ryan Meyering

    Ryan Meyering

    534
    May 4, 1999
    Well, maybe someday I'll get the nerve up to sharpen with a belt sander again... but that extra corse stone on the Apex can put on an edge awfully quick; two quick passes with the stone and the edge is completely reprofiled, and you know the edge bevels are exact. And it's a lot quiter, too. [​IMG]

    Ryan

    ------------------
    For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.

    Romans 6:23
     
  8. Cliff Stamp

    Cliff Stamp Banned BANNED

    Oct 5, 1998
    Sid :

    You can buy a belt grinder for the price of a Sharpmaker. A cheap 1" belt sander will easily handle all edge work.

    As for clamp type setups vs a belt sander, the rigs like the Apex require a lot less skill to use, are much more repeatable, a lot safer, and don't need a dedicated work area.

    Belt sanders however are tremendously faster on heavy jobs like damaged edges, and are more versatile. Taking an edge from 25 to 15 degrees, or removing a deep nick, even on a coarse stone is a long job, on a belt sander it is a few minutes.

    Of course a belt sander is nothing more than a slack piece of sandpaper moving around. If you are willing to move the blade yourslef, you can do away with the belt sander and just use the belts under tension. It is slower, but safer for the novice and there is no risk of damaging the blade.

    A buffer is something else to look into. It doesn't do anything that a strop won't do but is a lot faster.


    -Cliff
     

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